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Calling all Tuck (Dartmouth) Applicants: (2017 Intake) Class of 2019!!

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The Power of Education [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2017, 10:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: The Power of Education
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Tuck Net Impact Education Trek

By Erica Toews T’18

The Net Impact club led an inspiring education trek to Boston on Friday. To get multiple perspectives on education, we visited a public school, a charter school, an education technology company, and a nonprofit education organization. It was motivating to hear professionals speak with such passion for their work and to hear different approaches to education.

Avi Sethi T’16, strategic projects manager at Boston Public Schools (BPS), organized an amazing morning for us. Deputy Superintendent Dr. Karla Estrada had a presentation style that made it clear she has spent 20 years in education. She encouraged us to look at equity from an innovation lens and emphasized the importance of functioning as a team. She talked about the core values of BPS—equity, coherence, and innovation—and how all 126 schools in the district draw on these values to equip students with the four Cs: creative thinking, communication, critical thinking, and collaboration.

Next, we heard from the first panel of three speakers. Chief of Operations John Hanlon is working on two big initiatives to improve transportation and to extend learning time by adding 40 minutes to the school day. Chief Financial Officer Eleanor Laurence is breaking the framework of budgeting only one year in advance and leading the charge on long-term financial planning. Executive Director of Human Capital Zack Scott is shifting his focus from hiring to recruiting and developing. All three of them advised us to think about working in the public sector as opposed to the nonprofit sector and not to be afraid of doing unconventional things to get a foot in the door.

We heard from a second panel of three speakers. Program Manager for School Turnaround and Transformation Shira DeCovnick coordinates preventive and interventionist support for the lowest performing schools in the district. Assistant Superintendent for Social-Emotional Learning and Wellness Amalio Nieves is dedicated to ensuring a safe, healthy, and welcoming environment for students and teachers. Assistant Superintendent of Equity Becky Shuster spoke about proactive approaches to equity, with a special focus on racial and ethnic equity. They all challenged us to think about how to make public education more equitable.

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Next, we visited an Uncommon School in Roxbury. Uncommon is a network of 49 public charter schools in New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts. We walked through the silent hallways decorated with student work to observe a classroom in session. The teacher led a discussion on ancient Rome, and the students sat in their uniforms and raised their hands to participate. Each classroom is decorated with college posters to motivate student achievement. The level of student engagement and discipline is especially impressive given that Uncommon Schools are 100 percent lottery based. Our host attributed the success of Uncommon to the fact that leaders are trained internally, starting as teachers and growing within the organization. He discussed how the school is dedicated to infusing the student experience with both rigor and joy.

We traveled to Cengage, a company of 5,000 employees that provides content for one billion learners in the K-12, higher education, and professional markets worldwide. The second largest publisher of course materials in the U.S., Cengage is transitioning to digital content. Product Director Lauren Murphy spoke about the process of repositioning to enter the education technology space. One challenge of moving from 150 years of printing books to developing digital content has been training the salesforce on how to sell software. Lauren made an interesting point that technology provides an affordable solution that meets student needs, enabling the company to align its mission with a strategy for financial success.

The trek ended on a high note with our visit to Year Up, a one-year program for 18- to 24-year-olds with high school degrees. Year Up provides young adults with six months of learning and development, during which they receive technical and professional skills training, and six months of an internship. Students receive stipends, but money is taken out of their checks each time they break the contract. If students break the contract enough times, they “fire themselves” and are required to leave the program. Chief of Staff Bryan Mahony told us that 25 percent of Year Up students don’t finish the year, but he is not disheartened by this statistic because it signifies that Year Up is reaching its target audience: they want the riskiest students. Year Up is tackling the market mismatch between the skills of young people and the 12 million job openings, which Bryan called “the defining economic and social justice issue of our time.” Before we left, Bryan urged us to find jobs that enable us to say, “I know why I’m at work every day.”
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Reducing Waste at Campus Events [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2017, 14:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Reducing Waste at Campus Events
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An update on waste reduction efforts at the 2017 Business & Society Conference

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By Catherine Boysen T’18

Conferences at Tuck are a gathering place for discussion, ideas, and inspiration—but gathering of hundreds of people also produces a tremendous amount of waste. This year, the Business and Society Conference sought to challenge this norm by creating as little waste as possible during the two-day event. As a result, the conference produced less than one bag of landfill trash per day! Our learnings are easily replicable. Below is a summary of what we learned.

Sorting and Signage

Reducing waste starts with proper sorting, and proper sorting starts with signage. An improperly sorted recycling bag (e.g. one that is contaminated with trash or food) gets re-routed to the landfill. By decreasing our contamination rate, we reduce the amount of material added to the landfill by keeping it in the recycling stream. At the BSC, we found success by partnering with Casella Waste Management to make colorful, descriptive signs for each bin. It was essential to have a conference volunteer at each waste station to help guests with their sorting (and when necessary, to don gloves to re-sort a bag!).

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Communication

We recognized the need for better education around how to properly sort. For instance, many people don’t know that a paper coffee cup can’t be recycled due to the inner wax liner. This was the reason we encouraged everyone to bring their own mug, as fewer coffee cups used would mean less trash produced. We expanded our signage to engage guests not just as the point of throwing something out, but also at the point of pickup. As soon as they reached for a coffee cup or a plate, they’d have a clear sign telling them whether that product should be composted or thrown out.

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Materials

Waste reduction means we need to have the infrastructure to dispose of all our waste properly, and that includes compost for food waste and plates. We invested in compostable plates, cups, and cutlery, and we were delighted to find that two of our food vendors, theBox and King Arthur Flour provided us with compostable materials as well. But if we don’t have the infrastructure to dispose of it properly, these items will end up in the trash. During this conference, we worked hard to obtain compost bins and schedule a pickup, but this is not a currently established or easily accessible procedure.  It is essential that we work with Tuck to provide a composting solution that makes this choice easy for conferences and events in the future.

Reduce and Reuse

Small improvements can go a long way toward reducing waste.  We used coolers of water instead of plastic water bottles, we used TV screens to display digital schedules and information rather than printing paper programs, and we are coordinating efforts to reuse name badges next year.

In partnership with Tuck Sustains and the Dartmouth Sustainability Initiative, I hope to standardize these guidelines into procedures the entire college can adopt for large events. With a little effort and coordination, we can ensure that our conferences at Tuck make their lasting impact where we want them to—on our community dialogue and knowledge, rather than increasing our ever-growing footprint.
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Re: Calling all Tuck (Dartmouth) Applicants: (2017 Intake) Class of 2019!! [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2017, 05:29
Tuesday, April 18: Live Chat with Tuck Admission Director


Dear Applicants, We will conduct a live chat next week with Amy Mitson, Interim Co-Director of Admissions at Tuck. This is the last live chat of this application season. We hope all of you will attend the chat. If anyone can't attend the session but has questions for Tuck adcom, you can PM your questions to me and I will try to get their answers from the adcom. Thank you! See y'all in the event.

April 18, 2017 | Tuesday | 9:00 AM Pacific Time; 12:00 PM Eastern Time; 4:00 PM GMT | Place:New Chat Room
Add this event to your Google calendar




Brief intro of Amy Mitson: Amy has been at Tuck since 2000 and is currently Interim Co-Director of Admissions. Prior to working with Tuck Admissions, Amy was the Senior Associate Director of the MBA Program Office. As an admissions officer at Tuck, Amy serves on the admissions committee, reads applications, interviews candidates, oversees the campus visitation program, and manages recruiting efforts in Asia. Her combined student services and admissions experiences have helped her get acquainted with the day-to-day operations at Tuck as well as its history. Her favorite thing about Tuck is the people; working with the faculty, staff and students is a consistent source of motivation and inspiration.

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Attachment:
Tuck Chat.png
Tuck Chat.png [ 108.68 KiB | Viewed 3785 times ]

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The Tuck First-Year Project: Personal. Connected. Transformative. [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2017, 14:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: The Tuck First-Year Project: Personal. Connected. Transformative.
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By Vedrana Greatorex T'18

There were 40 of them sitting in four rows. Quietly and orderly. Women were dressed in beautiful, bright colored saris with bold shades of reds, yellows and golds gleaming in the morning sun. Men were simply dressed and eyed us with humble curiosity. Many of the women’s feet and palms were covered in bright red. It was before 9am at the Hetauda Community Eye Hospital, and the courtyard was already bustling with activity. The group of patients sitting patiently in front of me had arrived yesterday. Two in-house ophthalmologists performed 40 cataract surgeries the day before, a light day in their book, and were now preparing to remove the eye patches to ultimately determine if the operations were successful. One by one the patches came off. I saw many fingers being held up, as visual acuity was checked. One patient was grinning. In a sea of stern faces, this got my attention, so I asked what was funny. The ophthalmic assistant replied, “I asked him what he saw, and he answered a white person.” We grinned. Our team stood to the side, excited, expectant. I admit, I pretended there was something stuck in my eye as it may have gotten misty.

That morning, 40 eyes regained sight.

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Our team arrived in Nepal as guests of the Himalayan Cataract Project (HCP). The organization was founded by Dr. Sanduk Ruit and Dr. Geoff Tabin, in an effort to raise money and to support their bold mission of curing preventable blindness in some of the poorest and remotest corners of the earth. With the help of HCP and other partners, what started as a humanitarian mission with Dr. Ruit and $120 donation has now grown into the Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology (TIO) located in Kathmandu. TIO has expanded its reach beyond the country’s capital to twenty eye clinics scattered across all of Nepal. Together, HCP and TIO now serve populations in Ghana, Rwanda, Bhutan, Myanmar, India and Ethiopia.

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At Tuck, we say that our experience is meant to be personal, connected and transformative. With the absolute dread of sounding like a marketing brochure, this experience, this journey, was transformative for me in a way that I am unlikely to capture in 500 words. Kathmandu is a densely-populated city with bustling traffic, yet it lacks a single traffic signal. Traffic laws are akin to a bumper car ride at a fair, topped with gratuitous honking. Due to its population size and many unpaved roads, the city is dusty and polluted. However, most cars are clean and shiny, their owners taking tremendous pride in keeping their vehicles spotless. Each day we witnessed material poverty, but an abundance of hospitality, pride and joy. During the Holi festival, paint and colored water flew everywhere in a whimsical, celebratory manner, leaving everything covered in bright pigments. And yet, right next to a busy road, where hundreds of celebrants would pass each hour, somebody hung a dozen gleaming white towels to dry in the sun – there was not a spec of pigment on them, a tremendous display of respect and restraint. Old and new coexist; underneath big billboards advertising the latest Samsung technology, telephone poles carry a messy burden of hundreds of wires each. In one photo frame, you could capture women dressed in beautiful saris, women in fashionable western clothing, Buddhist monks in their crimson robes, men in business suits, and young boys with their stylish haircuts modeled after Korean movie stars.

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There is poetic justice in Nepal. In order to see some of the magnificent sights, you need to work for it—trekking or riding long hours on rocky roads, a combination of serpentines in the Alps and spring-season dirt roads in New England. But the sights are amazing—the bright white and gold of the Buddhist monasteries, endless, terraced fields on the steep sides of mountains, while never being quite sure if what you see in the far distance are clouds or snowy peaks of the Himalayas.

This is the third year that Tuck students traveled to Nepal during spring break on a global First-Year Project, working with the Himalayan Cataract Project. HCP is an organization curing preventable blindness in some of the poorest and remotest corners of the earth. If you want to read more about the organization, we highly

recommend reading the book by David Oliver Relin called Second Suns, and visiting the organization’s website.
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Re: Calling all Tuck (Dartmouth) Applicants: (2017 Intake) Class of 2019!! [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2017, 08:29
Tuck adcom chat will start in 20 minutes. If you are around, join the main chat room https://gmatclub.com/forum/mchat.php?fl=menu


Narenn wrote:
Tuesday, April 18: Live Chat with Tuck Admission Director


Dear Applicants, We will conduct a live chat next week with Amy Mitson, Interim Co-Director of Admissions at Tuck. This is the last live chat of this application season. We hope all of you will attend the chat. If anyone can't attend the session but has questions for Tuck adcom, you can PM your questions to me and I will try to get their answers from the adcom. Thank you! See y'all in the event.

April 18, 2017 | Tuesday | 9:00 AM Pacific Time; 12:00 PM Eastern Time; 4:00 PM GMT | Place:New Chat Room
Add this event to your Google calendar




Brief intro of Amy Mitson: Amy has been at Tuck since 2000 and is currently Interim Co-Director of Admissions. Prior to working with Tuck Admissions, Amy was the Senior Associate Director of the MBA Program Office. As an admissions officer at Tuck, Amy serves on the admissions committee, reads applications, interviews candidates, oversees the campus visitation program, and manages recruiting efforts in Asia. Her combined student services and admissions experiences have helped her get acquainted with the day-to-day operations at Tuck as well as its history. Her favorite thing about Tuck is the people; working with the faculty, staff and students is a consistent source of motivation and inspiration.

Image

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Attachment:
Tuck Chat.png

_________________

Every Wednesday: Meet MBA Experts in Chat Room and Ask Your Most-Pressing MBA Admission Questions to them in a Live Chat.

Must Read Forum Topics Before You Kick Off Your MBA Application

New GMAT Club Decision Tracker - Real Time Decision Updates

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A Tale of Two Cities: The 2017 Israel GIX [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2017, 13:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: A Tale of Two Cities: The 2017 Israel GIX
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By Michael Tensley T’18

During spring break of 2017, I traveled to Israel with 25 Tuck classmates for our Global Insight Expedition (GIX), guided by our two fearless leaders, professors Adam Kleinbaum and Daniella Reichstetter T’07. I would also be remiss if I forgot to mention our tour guide, Ori Abramson, who was a tremendous help. (No seriously, Ori was awesome!) The purpose of the trip was to study the impact of technology and entrepreneurship in Israel, specifically through the cities of Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, while also getting a taste of Israeli culture.

Before departing for Israel, our group met several times to gain an understanding of Israel’s history and also of each other’s history, both of which proved to be crucial to our in-country experience. While we were all Tuckies, we each represented myriad backgrounds including bankers, educators, animal rights activists, and even a former Olympic handball player. And although each of us might have had our own personal reasons for attending this particular GIX, we all shared a deep passion for learning about the unique history of the “Start-up Nation.”

Our GIX began in Jerusalem where we spent time truly becoming immersed in the ancient history of Israel. Our visits included Yad Vashem, the Old City, the Wailing Wall, the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, Masada, and the Ein Gedi. These experiences provided a foundation for what we would see for the rest of our trip while also connecting the historical and political learnings from our classroom sessions at Tuck. On our last day in Jerusalem, we even took a swim in the Dead Sea (and yes, you can in fact float). The second half of our trip was in Tel Aviv—and to say that Jerusalem and Tel Aviv were different would be a gross understatement. While Jerusalem represented heritage and tradition as a crossroads of the world’s largest religions, Tel Aviv was the quintessential modern city with skyscrapers and a bustling night life. During our time in Tel Aviv we met with local Israeli companies and entrepreneurs including a tour of Netafim, the Center of Digital Innovation, Sadara Ventures, Winward, Colu, and Google. Although Tel Aviv was the “modern” hub of Israel, the passion and love for the nation by its people could be felt in our every interaction.

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This GIX proved to be both challenging and enriching. Before this trip, I had only been outside the United States one time for a study abroad experience in Brussels, Belgium while I was in college. And even still, there is so much overlap between European and American cultures that it did not feel “too foreign.” The Israel GIX was my first experience being in a country that was vastly different from my own and it forced me to think critically and empathetically about the world outside of the one that I knew. It was because of this that I was able to gain a better appreciation for the diversity and adversity that truly moves our world forward. My only regret for our trip was that it could not be longer. But that only leaves a good excuse to visit again soon.

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Michael Tensley is a first-year student at Tuck. He grew up in Columbia, SC and attended Furman University, where he majored in business administration. Prior to Tuck, he worked as a business manager for Acosta Sales and Marketing in the consumer packaged goods industry. This summer he will be interning at Proctor & Gamble in Cincinnati, OH as an associate brand manager.

 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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TuckCast: A Conversation with Ema Reid T’17 [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: TuckCast: A Conversation with Ema Reid T’17
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In the third edition of TuckCast, Alen Amini T’18 sits down with Ema Reid T’17 to discuss what brought her to Tuck, her advice for prospective applicants, and her experience as a refugee of the Bosnian War.

 

After Tuck, Ema is headed to the marketing department at New Balance. Her desire to really challenge herself and strengthen her financial skillset are what brought her to Tuck.

 

“It’s really important to identify why you’re here. The application process is one where you really have to sit down and put a lot of thought into what you were really want to get out of your MBA experience. I think staying true to the reasons you listed on your application is going to be incredibly beneficial. … Looking back at my experience, and thinking about what I can bring to my employer in the coming year, I’m really excited to say that I have learned so much and I’ve fulfilled my reason for being here.”—Ema Reid

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Applying to b-school? Tips to Get Started [#permalink]

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New post 21 Apr 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Applying to b-school? Tips to Get Started
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It’s that time of year when we start to hear from people who are diligently preparing to submit an application in the next cycle. Here are a few quick pieces of advice for those in the earlier stages of the process:

Dig Deep

Introspection is key during the MBA application process. By the time you hit submit, you should know—and be able to articulate—exactly why you want an MBA. What are your short- and long-term career goals, and how is an MBA going to help get you there? Start big. What do you enjoy doing? What do you NOT enjoy doing? Do you like the industry you work in currently? What else are you interested in? Do you like the industry, but not your functional role? Do you like your functional role, but not the industry or company? Is an MBA necessary to grow and progress? Then go deeper. What companies are currently doing what you’re looking for? Is there anyone you can talk to in order to better understand this role/industry/company? Can you test the waters somehow?

There are at least two great reasons for this level of introspection. First, writing your essays and telling your story in an interview will come much more easily. You’ll also be more authentic and enthusiastic (not to mention look more prepared), which makes a much more compelling case. Ad Coms read a lot of essays, and talk to a lot of candidates—don’t just tell us what you think we want to hear. Secondly, you’ll be less overwhelmed when you get to b-school and are presented with a ton of career options. Even if you change your mind, or plan to explore, you'll have a personal road map to refer to.

Explore Schools

Start researching schools now, and keep it doing it! Dig through websites (there’s a ton of information there, so go beyond what you see on the homepage), talk to current students and alumni, and visit as many programs as you can. How will they help you accomplish your career goals? Be specific—look at the programs, courses, clubs, and initiatives that are available. Which school is the best fit for you personally? Where do you see yourself being able to stretch, grow, contribute, and have fun? Who are the students and alums you would want to work alongside and call part of your network?

Many schools offer ways to do this. At Tuck, we have a robust visit and interview program. Other opportunities to talk to Tuckies include Tuck Connections, online events, contacting club leadership or a Student Ambassador, and attending a student hosted coffee in your area. The Admissions Team also travels across the globe, for MBA Fairs, small coffee chats, and big Tuck Receptions (which often include alumni). Finally, don’t forget your personal networks and LinkedIn.

GMAT/GRE

Get this out of the way sooner rather than later. Don’t rush it, but give yourself time to focus on essays and interviews without the stress. Also, if you end up with a score that you don’t think will be competitive (check out class profiles for averages and ranges) or a score that you don’t think reflects your ability, this will give you time to retake it.

Finances

Don’t assume you’ll get a scholarship. If you do, that’s awesome! If you don’t, you’ll feel prepared and be a lot less stressed. Pay down other debt, look for funding options elsewhere, and save. It’s difficult to watch someone turn down their dream school solely because they received more money from another program.

Timing

A frequent question from applicants at this stage in the process: Does it really matter if I apply in a later round? Well, yes—but it matters more that your application is the strongest it can possibly be. When you’re confident you’re submitting your best though, do it as soon as possible! The earlier you apply, the more spots that are available in the class. We can only make so many offers for a class of 285 and it gets increasingly competitive as the rounds go on. If you’re thinking about this now, there’s still plenty of time to put together a strong application!

Good luck, and let us know how we can help along the way!
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Spring Break in a Conference Room? [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2017, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Spring Break in a Conference Room?
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By Samuel Goldhar T'18

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Choosing to spend the first half of our spring break in a conference room to kick off a 10-week consulting project might seem like a curious decision for a group of first-year Tuck students. Tuckies have amazing options for spring break; organized trips with classmates, international travel with professors on school-led Global Insight Expeditions (GIXs), spending time at home with family, or catching up on activities in the Upper Valley that we missed during the busy winter term. But when the conference room in question is at the global headquarters outside of Munich at PERI, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of scaffolding and formwork, and we have been challenged with a task by managing director Alexander Schwörer T’02, the opportunity to sit in that conference room is truly exciting. My team and I knew that by working with Alex we would have the opportunity to help shape the growth of a $1.3 billion company. A diverse group of Tuckies came together to confront this challenge.

As part of the First-Year Project (FYPGO) curriculum, two student teams spent a week at PERI in its beautiful headquarters facility in Weissenhorn, Germany. PERI gave us access to the resources we needed to understand the dynamics of its highly competitive business and allowed us to tour its state-of-the-art production facility. Working with regional sales and marketing leaders, we knew our work would be important to the staff who could be implementing our project’s recommendations within the year. Image

Our days were filled with back-to-back meetings with leaders of PERI’s business functions who shared their knowledge and challenged our early assumptions about the company and market. The PERI staff was highly organized, smart, and committed to the company, and quickly made it clear that they expected the same from us. We worked hard during our week on site at PERI to learn, document, and contextualize everything we could absorb for use back at school.

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While PERI made us feel welcome in its office in Weissenhorn, Alex opened the doors to his home city of Ulm. We were treated to dinners while we learned about the path Alex has taken as he helped build the family company into a global presence, and the high standards he holds both his production and business operations staff to. Alex showed us first-hand the fast pace and level of dedication required to lead a company, and the importance of balancing work with goals in our personal lives as well. A highlight of the week was the walking tour that Alex led us on around Ulm, giving up his Sunday to spend the day showing us the sites of his home town. It was a powerful moment when we stopped to remember that we were walking around in the rain with the head of a global company as he recounted the history of the town he loves and still calls home.

The next nine weeks of our project will require hard work but we are excited to have the opportunity to confront this important real-world question. Ultimately, we will deliver our recommendations to Alex in person here at Tuck, and virtually to his staff in Germany. We know that expectations from both Tuck and PERI are high, and we are looking forward to the challenge.
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‘Hidden Figures’ Screening at Tuck—Women In Business Week 2017 [#permalink]

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New post 27 Apr 2017, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: ‘Hidden Figures’ Screening at Tuck—Women In Business Week 2017
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By Sasha Cyriac T'18

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Tuck’s first ever Women In Business (WIB) Week kicked off with the screening of Oscar Best Picture nominated film Hidden Figures, an event co-hosted by WIB and Black Students At Tuck (BSAT) Clubs. Over 50 students came together to watch a movie featuring three brilliant African American women mathematicians–Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson—who played a pivotal role at NASA during the early years of the US space program. The movie sends a powerful message about the destructive consequences of discrimination. The movie was followed by a panel discussion with fellow Tuckies—Ashley Cousins T’17, Shruti Nambiar T’17, and Cassandra Farnow T’18—who shared their experiences on some of the gender and racial biases that exist at the workplace and discussed how to foster greater diversity.

The discussion started by recalling a scene from the movie where Vivian Michael (played by Kirsten Dunst), a white female manager at NASA, explains to Dorothy Vaughan (played by Octavia Spencer) that she does not have anything against them (women of color), Dorothy responds by saying, “I’m sure you believe that to be true.” The scene reflects how we are unaware of our own biases and choose to not stand up against acts of discrimination that happen in our presence.

So how do we discover and overcome these biases? We start by making those around us more sensitive to this issue and by encouraging both men and women to partake in such discussions. We lead by voicing out against discrimination happening in our midst against minorities and by creating a supportive environment for everyone. Let us not be silent witnesses anymore.

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Another key lesson we took away from the movie was to pick the right battles and stand up for ourselves. The movie shows how Katherine had to walk across campus for over half-a-mile, just to use the segregated washroom in the West Wing and how she was made to drink her coffee out of a separate jug that no one wanted to touch. She chose to remain silent, however when she was pushed beyond what she could handle she stood up for herself and confronted her team of white men by assertively stating how they were mistreating her. Through her struggle and willpower, she was able to outsmart all the men.

They say there’s a special place in hell for women who don’t help each other. The movie portrays three strong women, who at various points in the movie are supportive and encouraging of each other as demonstrated by what Dorothy says in response to Katherine’s new assignment, “any upward movement is movement for us all.” This sisterhood among women is important if we are to empower each other and progress as a community. As Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg wrote, “We need people who encourage us, believe in us, support us, and remind us that we are not alone. For women, this kind of support can be especially important—because, too often, the world tells women what we can’t do.”

We also discussed dual career relationships—a phenomenon that is becoming more common today. Several members of the Tuck community discussed how they and their partners struggle with managing both career and family. We talked about the importance of having those hard discussions on compromises that have to be made by both at various points in their career and family life.

Issues of racism and sexism are far from resolved, and only through our collective efforts can we hope to do so. So here’s a shout out to women at Tuck, women of color, women entrepreneurs, women executives, women who are assertive, women who are primary breadwinners, women who are homemakers—we support you and will stand by you so that together we can achieve what none of us can accomplish alone.

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First Investment for Tuck Social Venture Fund [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2017, 14:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: First Investment for Tuck Social Venture Fund
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By Jeff Lazarus T’17

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Last month, the Tuck Social Venture Fund (TSVF) made its first investment since its inception more than a year ago: a $25,000 convertible note in Education Modified (“EdModo”), a Boston-based start-up in the education technology space. The company, which helps teachers in improve the learning outcomes for students with special needs in their classrooms, addresses an underserved community with a differentiated product based on strong research.

While signing on the dotted line certainly felt good, getting there wasn’t easy. As a student-led impact fund, we invest in for-profit enterprises that that have both a social and financial return. One of the hardest aspects of this is trying to systematically measure social impact, an undertaking that has challenged the nascent impact investing space as a whole. EdModo was no different. Below is a brief overview of what that process looks like from our perspective as student fund directors. We hope it adds some color to what we do on TSVF, provides a better understanding of what an experiential learning activity looks like at Tuck, and inspires prospective students to consider getting involved in impact investing.

Let’s start at the beginning. We initially learned of EdModo through our relationship with Village Capital, a venture fund and accelerator. EdModo had recently graduated from Village Capital’s accelerator program and had also graduated from Learn Launch, a Boston-based ed tech-focused accelerator with longstanding Tuck ties.

After the warm introduction from Village Capital, our initial phone screens with Melissa Corto (the CEO and co-founder of EdModo) got us excited about the opportunity, and so began the due diligence sprint. Erin Dunn-Franklin T’17, one of our managing directors, led the three-person deal team. Erin’s background in education—she spent time in the classroom teaching in the Bronx as part of Teach For America—helped us get a better sense of the potential use cases and impact EdModo’s technology could have. We began placing calls with individuals in the education space, including former TSVF director Avi Sethi T’16 (now at Boston Public Schools) and others to get a better sense of the scope of the problem EdModo is trying to solve.

EdModo addresses one of the most pressing issues in K-12 education: how to help special needs students improve their learning performance. Research has revealed that teachers have trouble identifying how to best teach their special needs students, as many teachers face the challenge of instructing students with a wide array of disabilities, from dyslexia to Asperberger’s. This makes it especially difficult for a time-constrained and resource-stretched teacher to determine which strategy and set of tools might work best for each student.  What we loved abut EdModo from a social impact perspective was how the company’s success hinged directly on the efficacy of its technology: if it didn’t help teachers help students, schools wouldn’t buy the product.

Initial data among teachers who have used EdModo’s product are promising.Teachers feel more prepared and are more confident they can effectively implement need-specific strategies for their special education students. EdModo is now in over 70 schools and is used by over 1,300 teachers.

Beyond looking at the product’s social impact, we conducted a market analysis, competitive landscape analysis, and valuation exercise—many of the same types of analysis any venture fund would conduct. Our research into the learning management system space revealed that EdModo’s technology fills a unique niche and seamlessly integrates with other software already used by teachers, enabling instructors to quickly and easily use EdModo without going through the hassle of learning a wholly new platform.

EdModo came out of our diligence deep-dive looking even better than we initially thought. Of course, any seed stage deal is fraught with risks, and EdModo is no exception. The efficacy of the technology remains largely unproven (although initial indicators look good), and school budgets to buy EdModo’s product are already tight and susceptible to cuts.

While it’s still early days—both for the EdModo investment and TSVF as a whole—we’ve come out of this experience with a stronger sense of how to value and critically assess an investment opportunity and how to ask the right questions. As the next class of fund directors takes the reins this summer, they’ll be tasked with the new challenge of monitoring our investment going forward, trying to determine when and how to add value to EdModo’s management team. And, of course, we’ll be looking to build on this investment as we explore other deals next year.
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Vietnam in an Era of Reform and Globalization [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2017, 14:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Vietnam in an Era of Reform and Globalization
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By Ladji Kouyate T’17

My motivation for attending the Vietnam GIX course during spring break 2017 was very simple: I wanted to understand the factors that led Vietnam to go from a low-income country to a middle-income country. Coming from Cote d’Ivoire, a current low-income country, I thought lessons learned from Vietnam’s path to development were worth studying as they could potentially be applicable to my birthplace.

The theme of the GIX was “Vietnam in an Era of Reform and Globalization” and the goal was to examine the current political economy and its impact on the business climate. The course was led by Curt Welling, D’71, T’77, a senior fellow at the Center for Business, Government, & Society and former CEO at Americares, and Edward Miller, an associate professor of history at Dartmouth College. Both professors put together pre-course sessions that were very helpful in order to bring the group up to speed. They challenged us to analyze Vietnam through not only a business lens, but also cultural and historic lenses.

My classmates (26 altogether) and I all had various baseline knowledge of Vietnam. Our pre-GIX knowledge of the country ranged from an army veteran who had learned about Vietnam through strategy of war as a cadet, to a native of Minnesota who knew little about Vietnam and who was traveling abroad for the first time. Needless to say, the pre-course sessions both professors coordinated were much needed and turned out to be very useful once on the ground.

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Our GIX began in Hanoi, the political capital, where we spent time at the U.S. embassy, a state-owned enterprise, and the Ministry of Planning and Investment. These visits helped us cement our understanding of the interception between politics and business in Vietnam. Most notably, we visited Viettel, an international telecommunication company that conducts business as far as Peru, Mozambique, and France. Though successful in the competitive telecommunication industry, Viettel is still wholly-owned by the government. On the cultural front, we visited the mausoleum of Ho Chi Minh—affectionately referred to as Uncle Ho—who is considered the father of the Vietnamese nation. We experienced a day in the life of locals by partaking in a walking tour. Our second stop on the journey was Hoi An old town, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site, where we learned about the ancient history of Vietnam and enjoyed the pristine beaches. Our third and final stop was Ho Chi Minh, formerly known as Saigon. Here, we asked the preferred name of the city, to which our amazing guide Mr Kha confessed: (still) Saigon. Saigon is your quintessential metropole with skyscrapers, never-ending traffic, and amazing restaurants and nightlife. While in Saigon, we visited international companies and venture capital firms including Coca-Cola and Samsung to understand the business climate for both international firms and entrepreneurs.

All in all, the course exceeded my expectations. I had a chance to apply my classroom learnings to analyze a country’s political economy. As a second year, the trip allowed me to get to know first years in an intimate setting. More importantly, it solidified my interest in government policies and the impact they have on their population. I am looking forward to following Vietnam as its story continues to evolve.

Ladji Kouyate is a second-year student at Tuck. He grew up in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire and Attended Baruch College in New York City where he majored in Finance & Investments. Prior to Tuck, he worked as a consultant at Ernst & Young. He is a dual degree candidate with the Harvard Kennedy School. 

 
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TuckCast: Katelyn Baldwin T’17 Talks Global Experience at Tuck [#permalink]

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New post 08 May 2017, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: TuckCast: Katelyn Baldwin T’17 Talks Global Experience at Tuck
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In the fourth edition of TuckCast, Alen Amini T’18 sits down with Katelyn Baldwin T'17 to learn more about her global experience at Tuck and her involvement with the Center for Business, Government & Society in bringing former U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte and then New Hampshire Governor Maggie Hassan to campus to engage in a dialogue about fundamental issues during a very visible election.

After Tuck, Katelyn plans to take a job with the Vanguard Group, Inc. in Pennsylvania, a company that she describes as having a "culture, mission, and values very much align with who I am as a person." She looks forward to joining their leadership development program and expanding their global opportunities.

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Tuck Students Visit Top-Tier VC Firms in Silicon Valley [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2017, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Students Visit Top-Tier VC Firms in Silicon Valley
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By Erica Toews, Jodine Gordon, Masato Morishima

Tuck’s Venture Capital (VC) trek to California provided a fascinating lens through which to view Silicon Valley. Over two days, 26 first-year students visited eight VC firms, one accelerator, and one bank. During these visits, we learned that there are a myriad of business models and philosophies that can “win” in early-stage technology investing.

Norwest Ventures

We started at Norwest Ventures in Palo Alto, where Ed Yip D’04 introduced several topics that became themes over the course of the trek. He spoke about the positive aspects of working in VC: setting your own schedule, networking with smart people, seeing exciting new technology, and gaining exposure to the startup ecosystem. He also acknowledged the frustrating aspects of the job. Backing startups involves luck and timing, so it’s possible to work hard, or not at all, and still end up in the same place. His advice to those of us interested in a career in VC was to build a network, start a company, create a brand online, and develop expertise in a space we’re passionate about.

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GE Ventures

At GE Ventures in Menlo Park, David Mayhew explained that corporate venture capital (CVC) funds come and go because they prioritize the strategic goals of the parent company over financial returns, so GE Ventures took measures to avoid this. First, they set up their office on Sand Hill Road, at the epicenter of top performing VC firms and far away from east coast GE headquarters. Second, the CEO and senior investors come from outside GE, which is important because “one role of CVC is to shake up the parent company.” David noted that the public always hears about unicorns, but not enough about failed companies, which creates a misconception about how difficult VC is. A large part of investing is a numbers game, so firms “spray and pray.” Since competition for quality deals is intense, VCs work hard to differentiate themselves in the eyes of entrepreneurs.

Draper Fisher Jurvetson

Next, we walked to Draper Fisher Jurvetson (DFJ) to meet Heidi Roizen. It was exciting to meet her in person because we read a case about her for the fall term core class Leading Individuals and Teams. Heidi believes that all successful entrepreneurs are optimists because they must believe in their ability to solve a billion-dollar problem. The paradox about entrepreneurship is that, if you start a company to exit, you won’t succeed because you need to want to change the world. However, when an entrepreneur takes money from a VC, they’re agreeing to exit. Heidi said that’s why most entrepreneurs should not be venture backed. She believes strongly that a relationship-driven life is the best way to live and that happiness and success are about meaningful work and meaningful relationships. She advised us to think of humans first, jobs second, and encouraged us to “build a rich tapestry of fellow travelers.”

Google Ventures

We left Sand Hill Road for Google Ventures (GV) in Mountain View, where Rick Klau shared his unplanned path into the world of VC. At every stage of his career at Google, which spanned product management, business development, and marketing, Rick pursued work that he was passionate about. He cautioned us never to “take a job for the job it will get you to next” or we’ll never be satisfied.

Andreessen Horowitz

The next day, we returned to Sand Hill Road to visit Andreessen Horowitz (a16z), where Steve McDermid T’05 shared the firm’s unique culture and focus on operational expertise. Most of the firm’s employees provide comprehensive support services to the portfolio companies rather than the investment team. Motivated by the desire to disaggregate functions typically performed by general partners, a16z hosts networking events for entrepreneurs to share ideas and receive feedback. Steve emphasized the importance of a technical founder and pointed out that the most successful companies have founders as CEOs.

New Enterprise Associates

Rick Yang, Karthik Kumar, and Amit Mukherjee welcomed us at New Enterprise Associates (NEA). When we asked about their favorite part of VC, they all agreed it was working with founders. People starting companies are smart and eager to have candid conversations, and VC investors find it humbling and fulfilling to learn from them. Rick said, “You have to have a little crazy in you to start a company because, rationally, no one should do it. You put your heart and soul into it, knowing the odds are stacked against you.” Their least favorite part of VC? Having to pass on a deal, especially when it’s because of something outside of the founder’s control (e.g., NEA already has a portfolio company in that space). There’s a sense of “fomo” knowing that if you don’t make the investment now, you might not be able to make it later.

Silicon Valley Bank

We left Sand Hill Road to visit Silicon Valley Bank (SVB) in San Francisco, a commercial bank that serves 60% of startups and 60% of VC firms in Northern California. We met Ted Wilson T’09, who explained that SVB has a different relationship with entrepreneurs than VC firms do: SVB is a service provider rather than a partner. Ted worked in VC before SVB and prefers his current life because he has more access to high quality entrepreneurs.

500 Startups

At 500 Startups, Marvin Liao talked about the firm’s distinct hybrid model of seed funding and accelerator and their “high velocity” approach to investing. While the check size is smaller and the investment earlier than traditional VC, 500 Startups invests in hundreds of companies annually. Most of their portfolio companies go through their accelerator program in grouped cohorts called batches, and the founders spend four months in the firm’s downtown San Francisco office. While most VCs concentrate their investments on startups in the Bay Area and the U.S., we found 500 Startups’ global emphasis to be unique.

Bain Capital Ventures

At Bain Capital Ventures (BCV), Bill Lehmann D’12 and Molly MacKenzie led us onto a gorgeous roof deck with a view of the Bay Bridge. Bill explained that BCV mostly invests in early stage B2B companies, which he believes have the advantage of more rational and predictable buyer preferences than consumer-centric businesses. He acknowledged that while consumer offers higher risk, that can also mean higher reward. Bill often looks to invest in founders who have lived with a pain point and decided to build companies out of their frustration with the status quo.

DBL Partners

Our final stop on the trek was DBL Partners, a mid-size impact investing firm. Patrick Sagisi believes in the “double bottom line”: there doesn’t need to be a tradeoff between profit and doing good for the world. He always asks entrepreneurs why they’re doing what they’re doing before he invests because “the idea isn’t hard. Doing the idea is hard.” Once his firm makes an investment, they stick with it because “companies are fragile and take time to grow.” Patrick advised us to try anything and be in the flow of the industries we want to be in.

This was the third annual VC trek to Silicon Valley, and we look forward to passing the torch to the T’19s!
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GANESHA’S BLESSING: THE 2017 INDIA GIX [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2017, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: GANESHA’S BLESSING: THE 2017 INDIA GIX
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By Haydar Can Taygun T'18

Spring break of 2017 was a truly unforgettable and life-changing experience for 26 diverse and (randomly) well-matched Tuckies who went on the India Global Insight Expedition (GIX) with Professor Anant Sundaram, Sudershan Tirumala T’10, and Ravi Raj T’07.

The theme of our expedition to Hyderabad and Mumbai was India Re-emergent: Growth & Empowerment. Guided by the findings of a McKinsey Global Institute report, our goal was to see how India is transforming its challenges into opportunities.

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Empowerment

Empowerment involves the economic and social inclusion of roughly 20 percent of India, approximately 250 million people. Providing basic services and triggering job creation for this portion of the population is key to the re-emergence of India.

We met two institutions that are willing to accept this challenge on their own without passing the buck to the government: LV Prasad Eye Institute and TATA Business Support Services. The Robin Hood of eye care, LV Prasad is perhaps one of the most innovative institutions of India in structuring the social safety net both in a rural and urban context by providing eye care for the masses. TATA BSS, by focusing on services, is acting as a dynamo of serial job creation in rural areas, training and scaling the unskilled and disadvantaged workers.

Given the cultural baggage of gender parity in the country, empowerment should also address India’s most valuable asset, women. The empowerment of women matters not solely because of untapped GDP potential, but rather because Indian women deserve respect for their greatness. In most of the organizations visited, we were impressed to see active steps taken towards positive discrimination, a great start to unlocking the potential of Indian women.

Growth

Growth, was our second major theme. Sustaining growth through investments in infrastructure and manufacturing is essential to solve the chronic socioeconomic problems of India, the most important being abject poverty.

On the infrastructure side, I was expecting to see something completely different after interviewing my Indian classmates before leaving Tuck. I was pleasantly surprised when I set foot in the country at Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport: GVK, one of the key infrastructure players of India, did an outstanding job. In Hyderabad, we saw the metro rail project in construction, demonstrating Telangana’s capacity to respond to urbanization—another important issue for India—in an efficient manner. Finally, we heard from Telangana’s Minister of Information Technology, KTR, that the regional government is currently working on a fiber cabling project that will leapfrog ADSL and take fiber to rural areas through a PPP model. Without a doubt, these projects are creating thousands of jobs and paving the way for further investments in the real economy.

On the manufacturing side, we visited Dr. Reddy’s, a pharma giant that originated in India. Its Research and Development facilities coupled with an FDA regulated plant in Hyderabad differentiate the company as a net exporter to the U.S.in a highly regulated market. Dr. Reddy’s is adding tremendous value by not only learning from generic drug manufacturing, but also enabling Indian scientists to develop new active ingredient combinations, an expertise that is gradually taking them from generics to originals in the international arena.

In Mumbai, we experienced a completely different version of manufacturing. Dharavi, one of the largest slums in the world with more than one million Mumbai dwellers, is the backstreet of Indian manufacturers. This slum of opportunity is an informal economy with more than one billion dollars in revenue. It assumes the role of a labor-intensive outsourcer for big manufacturers in plastics, metals, and textiles, helping them boost productivity and cut costs by not worrying about recycling.

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As a group, we also witnessed the challenges the community faces. The poor infrastructure for power and sewage and pollution arising from emissions are alarming issues. By improving elementary infrastructure and quality of workspaces (filtration), the local government can go miles in gradually formalizing this interesting economy. Dwellers of Dharavi will appreciate such an effort more than the recent construction of an unpopular overpass in the middle of the neighborhood.

The biggest takeaway from our expedition to India was the significant role that strong institutions and a functioning legal system can play in an emerging economy. India will re-emerge, becoming the singular growth opportunity and a society that respects equality by strengthening and deepening its democracy.

May Ganesha, the Hindu deity who is the remover of obstacles, bless India on its path to re-emerge!

Haydar Can Taygun T'18 is a first-year student at Tuck. He grew up in Istanbul, Turkey, and graduated from Brown University in 2011, majoring in Economics and Political Science. Prior to Tuck, he worked in energy finance in Turkey.

 
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Ganesha’s Blessing: The 2017 India GIX [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2017, 10:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Ganesha’s Blessing: The 2017 India GIX
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By Haydar Can Taygun T'18

Spring break of 2017 was a truly unforgettable and life-changing experience for 26 diverse and (randomly) well-matched Tuckies who went on the India Global Insight Expedition (GIX) with Professor Anant Sundaram, Sudershan Tirumala T’10, and Ravi Raj T’07.

The theme of our expedition to Hyderabad and Mumbai was India Re-emergent: Growth & Empowerment. Guided by the findings of a McKinsey Global Institute report, our goal was to see how India is transforming its challenges into opportunities.

Image

Empowerment

Empowerment involves the economic and social inclusion of roughly 20 percent of India, approximately 250 million people. Providing basic services and triggering job creation for this portion of the population is key to the re-emergence of India.

We met two institutions that are willing to accept this challenge on their own without passing the buck to the government: LV Prasad Eye Institute and TATA Business Support Services. The Robin Hood of eye care, LV Prasad is perhaps one of the most innovative institutions of India in structuring the social safety net both in a rural and urban context by providing eye care for the masses. TATA BSS, by focusing on services, is acting as a dynamo of serial job creation in rural areas, training and scaling the unskilled and disadvantaged workers.

Given the cultural baggage of gender parity in the country, empowerment should also address India’s most valuable asset, women. The empowerment of women matters not solely because of untapped GDP potential, but rather because Indian women deserve respect for their greatness. In most of the organizations visited, we were impressed to see active steps taken towards positive discrimination, a great start to unlocking the potential of Indian women.

Growth

Growth, was our second major theme. Sustaining growth through investments in infrastructure and manufacturing is essential to solve the chronic socioeconomic problems of India, the most important being abject poverty.

On the infrastructure side, I was expecting to see something completely different after interviewing my Indian classmates before leaving Tuck. I was pleasantly surprised when I set foot in the country at Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport: GVK, one of the key infrastructure players of India, did an outstanding job. In Hyderabad, we saw the metro rail project in construction, demonstrating Telangana’s capacity to respond to urbanization—another important issue for India—in an efficient manner. Finally, we heard from Telangana’s Minister of Information Technology, KTR, that the regional government is currently working on a fiber cabling project that will leapfrog ADSL and take fiber to rural areas through a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) model. Without a doubt, these projects are creating thousands of jobs and paving the way for further investments in the real economy.

On the manufacturing side, we visited Dr. Reddy’s, a pharma giant that originated in India. Its Research and Development facilities coupled with an FDA regulated plant in Hyderabad differentiate the company as a net exporter to the U.S.in a highly regulated market. Dr. Reddy’s is adding tremendous value by not only learning from generic drug manufacturing, but also enabling Indian scientists to develop new active ingredient combinations, an expertise that is gradually taking them from generics to originals in the international arena.

In Mumbai, we experienced a completely different version of manufacturing. Dharavi, one of the largest slums in the world with more than one million Mumbai dwellers, is the backstreet of Indian manufacturers. This slum of opportunity is an informal economy with more than one billion dollars in revenue. It assumes the role of a labor-intensive outsourcer for big manufacturers in plastics, metals, and textiles, helping them boost productivity and cut costs by not worrying about recycling.

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As a group, we also witnessed the challenges the community faces. The poor infrastructure for power and sewage and pollution arising from emissions are alarming issues. By improving elementary infrastructure and quality of workspaces (filtration), the local government can go miles in gradually formalizing this interesting economy. Dwellers of Dharavi will appreciate such an effort more than the recent construction of an unpopular overpass in the middle of the neighborhood.

The biggest takeaway from our expedition to India was the significant role that strong institutions and a functioning legal system can play in an emerging economy. India will re-emerge, becoming the singular growth opportunity and a society that respects equality by strengthening and deepening its democracy.

May Ganesha, the Hindu deity who is the remover of obstacles, bless India on its path to re-emerge!

Haydar Can Taygun T'18 is a first-year student at Tuck. He grew up in Istanbul, Turkey, and graduated from Brown University in 2011, majoring in Economics and Political Science. Prior to Tuck, he worked in energy finance in Turkey.

 
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Mindfulness Meditation at Tuck—Why Students are Making Time to Practic [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2017, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Mindfulness Meditation at Tuck—Why Students are Making Time to Practice
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By Carole Gaudet

Three T’18s are taking the helm as student leaders of the Tuck Mindfulness Society, a group of students, faculty and staff who meet on campus twice each week to practice meditation together. Catherine Boysen, Zoltan Czinkoczky and Brad Martin are making mindfulness meditation—a simple technique for cultivating calm, focus, empathy, and kindness to oneself—a part of Tuck’s everyday culture.

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What inspired you to get involved with meditation at Tuck?

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Brad: I had done a lot of hiking with a friend who has been meditating his whole life. We would go on long hikes in the Adirondack Mountains, and he would say, “you have these shocks of being in the present moment when you hike, and you feel so grateful.” Meditation has aroused that gratefulness and joy in my day to day life.

Zoltan: My mind is always racing, and I felt that maybe some balance would be beneficial. Having a set period of time once or twice a week helps me stick to the habit.

What are the benefits to meditation? What keeps you coming back?

Brad: The club has built a sense of community that is totally different from everything else at Tuck, which can be very focused on careers, sports, and classes.

Zoltan: It’s great for keeping things in context and managing stress. I often felt myself getting carried away, especially in the fall, and then I’d stop and ask myself, does it really matter? Staying calm is useful in any kind of setting.

Catherine: It’s like slowing down to speed up. When I take that time for myself, I find I can handle more.

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What do business leaders have to gain from med or mindfulness?

Brad: I had the Mindfulness club on my resume, and I was shocked at how often mindfulness and meditation came up during interviews. It’s great for listening and empathizing. Both of which are critical when managing people.

Catherine: As a business leader, you’re going to be in a better position if you’re good at managing emotions when you have to make a decision.

What has surprised you about meditation?

Catherine: There’s no way to do it wrong. Everyone has the same experience of thoughts wanting to come in while you’re trying to meditate, and everyone has the same experience of working with putting them aside. It teaches you to be generous and forgiving with yourself.

The Tuck Mindfulness Society sessions are free and open to the entire Tuck community. The classes are taught by Bruce McClelland, a business analyst at Dartmouth College, who has been practicing meditation for 35 years and teaching for the past 25 years, and supported by Tuck staffer Carole Gaudet, who has been practicing for the past 13 years.

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If at First You Don’t Succeed: Tips for Reapplicants [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2017, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: If at First You Don’t Succeed: Tips for Reapplicants
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Kristin Roth, associate director of admissions, recently hosted a chat on Beat the GMAT titled If at First You Don't Succeed: Tips for Reapplicants. In that same spirit of helping you submit a stronger application than before, we've elaborated on some of her tips—read on! 

First, what do we think of reapplicants? We are happy to see them! The fact that you are committed enough to Tuck to try again shows us you sincerely want to be here—and we like people who really want to be here! That said, we want to see reapplicants who have taken steps to strengthen their candidacy, not someone who simply resubmits the previous application. Spend some time evaluating what areas might have held you back the first time and work hard to improve them. Some common areas that come to mind are: GMAT score; limited quantitative skills; limited work experience; unclear goals or reasons for wanting to come to Tuck; failure to differentiate yourself from others.

On the GMAT, while there is no magic number required for admission, and we admit people with a wide range of scores, if you find your score is significantly below our average, you might want to consider giving it another try. If you are at our average, but know you can probably do better, a higher score does help differentiate your application.

If you are someone who has had very limited exposure to quantitative skills during undergrad or through work, and/or a low quant score on the GMAT, you might want to consider taking some classes to show us that you can handle the work. Suggested classes would be financial accounting, statistics and microeconomics.

In terms of work experience, again there is no magic number as to how many years you must have, but if you are only a year or two out of school, you might want to think about waiting a little longer to reapply until you get some more experience under your belt. Additionally, if you are on the briefer side of experience (and actually, this goes for any applicant) you really want to highlight the quality of the experience you have had. So even if it is brief, show us how much you have accomplished.

Unclear goals and/or reasons for wanting to come to Tuck is something we see from a lot of applicants. While we don’t need your life plan down to the most specific detail, having a good sense of where you are heading is important. The best answers to this question tell us what you want to do short-term and long-term (and short-term should not be “getting an MBA,” we want to know what you want to do post-MBA) and why you want to do that. What in your past experiences has led you to this conclusion? Next tell us why an MBA is going to help you reach those goals, and try to be more specific than just “getting business skills.” Finally, tell us why an MBA from Tuck, as opposed to other schools, will help you reach those goals. Talk about unique programs we offer that are related to your area of interest or how the community will support your plans.

Finally, differentiating yourself from the rest of the applicant pool: this can be hard sometimes, but focus on being yourself. Let your personality come through. You are more than just your job or where you went to school. Tell us who you really are and what you are passionate about, rather than telling us what you think we want to hear. Tell us what makes you unique and how your experiences will contribute to the community and the learning of your classmates.

Procedurally, applying as a reapplicant is just the same as the first time you applied. You must complete the entire application, including all of the essays. Additionally, you must complete a reapplicant essay explaining how you have strengthened your application, so going through the analysis outlined above will be helpful. (There will be a "have you previously applied to Tuck?" question that triggers this.) Even if the essay prompts are comparable to those from previous years, you're strongly encouraged to rewrite all of them. Some of the topics you choose may be very similar, but approaching them with a fresh voice is likely to make them stronger.

We will have your prior application when we review your new one, and will refer back to it. However, we will not review it as carefully as your new application, so make sure that anything important is included in your new application. It can also look sloppy (or even dishonest) when things don't seem to match up between the two. Finally, a note on timing: The application pool does get increasingly competitive as the admissions season goes on. As a reapplicant, you should be in a fairly favorable position when it comes to feeling ready to submit. The earlier you can do it, the better. 

If you're able to, we encourage you to come to campus for an interview, even if you already interviewed before. It provides another opportunity for you to share your story and explain what you have done in the past year to improve your application. However, if you are not able to visit again, we will have your prior interview evaluation on file. We may, or may not, invite you to re-interview depending on whether we need additional information.

Good luck! We look forward to hearing from you again, and remember; some of our favorite students at Tuck were ones who got in on the second try (and a few on the third!).
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TuckCast: Meet Assistant Dean Sally Jaeger [#permalink]

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New post 24 May 2017, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: TuckCast: Meet Assistant Dean Sally Jaeger
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In the latest episode of TuckCast, get to know Sally Jaeger, assistant dean and director of the MBA Program at Tuck. Recipient of the 2016 Tuck Overseers Medal, Sally shares what she loves most about her job and a few of her favorite memories during her more than 20 years at Tuck.

Here’s what a few people in the Tuck community have to say about Sally:

“Tuck is the special place it is because of people like Sally Jaeger. She is the embodiment of what Tuck stands for.”—Jeremiah Palmer T’08

“Knowing Sally has made me a better person. Her very being is a model for how to carry oneself professionally and personally. If I achieve even a fraction of the impact she has had on others, then I will consider myself wildly successful.”—Edgar Pastrana T’11, director of global initiatives, Starwood Hotels and Resorts

“I would be hard-pressed to think of another member of the Tuck community who has led by example in a way that demonstrates the spirit of creating an inclusive community that inspires people to be their better selves. For me personally, I’ve had the pleasure of learning from and working with Sally for nearly a decade. I continue to learn from and be inspired by what she does. There’s never an issue or person too unimportant for Sally. The empathetic wisdom she brings to the Tuck community is remarkable.”—Dean Matthew J. Slaughter

“There are few people who so uniquely embody the Tuck spirit of community. Sally is one of them. Sally’s gift lies in identifying the diamond in the rough, the non-traditional talent that is equally capable of excellence, but has been focused in non-traditional areas.”—Krystal Williams T’03, Juris Doctor candidate, University of Maine School of Law

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Tuck Runs For Veterans [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2017, 14:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Runs For Veterans
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By Jon Torbett T'18

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Over the last several months, fellow classmate David Bates T’18 and I had the unique privilege to plan and execute Tuck Runs for Veterans, an annual fundraiser organized by the Tuck Armed Forces Alumni Association (AFAA).

This year, we partnered with the Veterans Education and Research Association of Northern New England (VERANNE), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization based in White River Junction, with the goal of purchasing a van to transport local veterans in the Upper Valley to and from veteran educational events in therapeutic sports and arts.

In what proved to be a valuable capstone to my first year at Tuck, this event left me with three key impressions as I reflect back on the experience.

Tuck Volunteers

Events like these are rarely an individual effort and I would be remiss if I didn’t take another opportunity thank all of those who volunteered their time and support to make this event possible. Whether designing posters, working the registration table, or dutifully manning and marking every turn on the race course, each person who contributed their time did so enthusiastically and selflessly. When given the opportunity to come together in support of something bigger than themselves, Tuckies show up in numbers, and they do it with a smile.

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Once a Tuckie, Always a Tuckie

One of the things I heard most frequently about Tuck before arriving was the accessibility of alumni and their willingness to pick up the phone or lend a hand with just about anything you might need, career related or otherwise. Through the experience of Tuck Runs for Veterans, the quality of the Tuck alumni network was affirmed and sincerely appreciated. Generations of alums including Jeff Coleman T’87 at PROBAR and Caroline Kendall T’09 at Quoddy were quick to respond to the call, making donations and offering marketing advice. I also got in touch with past Tuck veterans who were excited to connect with the current AFAA leadership and made themselves available for support.

There’s no place like the Upper Valley

I was absolutely blown away by the turnout at Tuck Circle, which included over 150 5k runners, 20 Tiny Tuckies, 27 volunteers, the T’18 band, and a host of lively spectators. As a veteran myself, the overwhelming support from Tuck and the Upper Valley community, through participation and donations, made me realize just how special this place is.

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To date, the Tuck AFAA has raised over $14,000 for VERANNE, which will help make alternative therapies and active rehabilitation more readily available to local area veterans. This was no easy task, especially for me. Soliciting funds, no matter how worthy the cause, is not something that comes naturally to me. In fact, I regularly shy away from this type of role because it puts me out of my element, far removed from my comfort zone. It is precisely this flavor of opportunity, however, that brought me to Tuck. I came here to be challenged, to be a part of an incredible community, and to grow as a person. When I learned about Tuck Runs for Veterans, I decided to take on an active role in raising awareness and support for veterans, even if it meant cold-calling companies and alumni to share our story.

David and I wrote letters and met with over 20 local businesses and foundations to help raise funds for our nonprofit partners and we received an outpouring of support. It is with tremendous gratitude that we offer a special thanks to the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation, Mascoma Savings Bank, and many more individual contributors for their generous cash donations. Also, to Lo & Sons, Quoddy, Lou’s Restaurant & Bakery, Ramunto’s of Hanover, Skinny Pancake, Mighty Yoga, PROBAR, and R.e.d.d. for their prize and race day contributions. Last, but certainly not least, a huge thank you to everyone who participated in the event—we look forward to next year’s race!

Tuck AFAA is a community of U.S. and foreign graduate students committed to providing resources and support to veterans at Tuck and their families through integration, recruitment, and veterans’ networking initiatives. Additionally, the AFAA endeavors to raise awareness and create discourse about military and veterans’ issues within the Tuck School of Business and Greater Dartmouth College community.

Photos by Rob Strong
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Tuck Runs For Veterans   [#permalink] 26 May 2017, 14:00

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