GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 18 Oct 2019, 01:48

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Cambridge University scientists recently created nanoflowers

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Status: 1,750 Q's attempted and counting
Affiliations: University of Florida
Joined: 09 Jul 2013
Posts: 475
Location: United States (FL)
Schools: UFL (A)
GMAT 1: 600 Q45 V29
GMAT 2: 590 Q35 V35
GMAT 3: 570 Q42 V28
GMAT 4: 610 Q44 V30
GPA: 3.45
WE: Accounting (Accounting)
Cambridge University scientists recently created nanoflowers  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Nov 2013, 11:23
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  15% (low)

Question Stats:

79% (01:01) correct 21% (01:25) wrong based on 133 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Cambridge University scientists recently created nanoflowers – microscopic bouquets
of silicon carbide "blooms" that not only exhibit visual beauty but also may be useful
for industrial processes; nanoflowers may, for instance, serve as water repellents
that can be turned on and off by a temperature change.

A. processes; nanoflowers may, for instance, serve
B. processes; which might, as an instance, be the serving
C. processes, as an instance, to serve
D. processes, like to serve
E. processes, such as to be serving


OE to follow
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Status: Student
Joined: 26 Aug 2013
Posts: 167
Location: France
Concentration: Finance, General Management
Schools: EMLYON FT'16
GMAT 1: 650 Q47 V32
GPA: 3.44
Re: Cambridge University scientists recently created nanoflowers  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Nov 2013, 15:49
1
avohden wrote:
Cambridge University scientists recently created nanoflowers – microscopic bouquets
of silicon carbide "blooms" that not only exhibit visual beauty but also may be useful
for industrial processes; nanoflowers may, for instance, serve as water repellents
that can be turned on and off by a temperature change.

A. processes; nanoflowers may, for instance, serve
B. processes; which might, as an instance, be the serving
C. processes, as an instance, to serve
D. processes, like to serve
E. processes, such as to be serving


OE to follow


tricky one here!

A. processes; nanoflowers may, for instance, serve - CORRECT
B. processes; which might, as an instance, be the serving - Which refers to the wrong word
C. processes, as an instance, to serve - As an instance is wordy
D. processes, like to serve - like to serve is wordy and not correct
E. processes, such as to be serving - to be serving is wrong

Hope its clear!

I tried to explain it in another way, by looking at the meaning of the sentence but it will be to complicated. This way is the simpliest one!
_________________
Think outside the box
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Status: 1,750 Q's attempted and counting
Affiliations: University of Florida
Joined: 09 Jul 2013
Posts: 475
Location: United States (FL)
Schools: UFL (A)
GMAT 1: 600 Q45 V29
GMAT 2: 590 Q35 V35
GMAT 3: 570 Q42 V28
GMAT 4: 610 Q44 V30
GPA: 3.45
WE: Accounting (Accounting)
Re: Cambridge University scientists recently created nanoflowers  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Nov 2013, 20:18
1
Official Explanation

Answer A
- The proper idiomatic use of the word "instance" when indicating an example, is "for instance", not "as an instance". Therefore, a vertical scan allows us to eliminate (B) and (C).

(E) would require "such as by serving" to be correct, so we eliminate (E).

(D) incorrectly uses "like" to introduce an example; "such as" - or, less commonly, "for instance" or "for example" - should always be used to introduce an example. Therefore, we eliminate (D) and are left with choice (A), the correct answer.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 14 Sep 2013
Posts: 18
Location: India
Schools: ISB '15 (M)
WE: Medicine and Health (Health Care)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Cambridge University scientists recently created nanoflowers  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Nov 2013, 08:07
if, 'as to be serving' is omitted from E, will it be a better choice?
Director
Director
User avatar
D
Joined: 08 Jun 2013
Posts: 543
Location: France
Schools: INSEAD Jan '19
GMAT 1: 200 Q1 V1
GPA: 3.82
WE: Consulting (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Cambridge University scientists recently created nanoflowers  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Oct 2018, 09:52
The sentence doesn't appear to have any errors in it. A distinctive feature is the semicolon, but it is used correctly to join two independent clauses. Plan to select (A), but check the choices to make sure nothing was overlooked.

A quick scan of the choices doesn't reveal any clear patterns or grouping. Two use semicolons and three use commas, but either could be correct depending on how the sentence is structured. Proceed to compare the choices more carefully.

(B) is incorrect because the proper idiomatic use of the word "instance," when indicating an example, is for instance, not "as an instance." Additionally, (B) ends up reading "be the serving as water repellents," which makes no sense.

(C) also uses the incorrect "as an instance" instead of the idiomatically correct for instance.

(D) incorrectly uses "like" to introduce an example. The word "like" is used to compare things, as in The dog's eyes were brown, like its owner's eyes. A phrase often used correctly to introduce an example is such as.

(E)'s "to be serving" is needlessly wordy and doesn't make sense following "such as." Eliminate (E).

As expected, (A) is the answer.
_________________
Everything will fall into place…

There is perfect timing for
everything and everyone.
Never doubt, But Work on
improving yourself,
Keep the faith and
Stay ready. When it’s
finally your turn,
It will all make sense.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Cambridge University scientists recently created nanoflowers   [#permalink] 14 Oct 2018, 09:52
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Cambridge University scientists recently created nanoflowers

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne