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Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno

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Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2017, 07:51
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Question Stats:

49% (01:31) correct 51% (01:33) wrong based on 63 sessions

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Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs cannot be found within the current piecemeal system of paying these costs. The reason is that this system gives health-care providers and insurers every incentive to shift, wherever possible, the costs of treating illness onto each other or any other party, including the patient. That clearly is the lesson of the various reforms of the 1980s: push in on one part of this pliable spending balloon and an equally expensive bulge pops up elsewhere. For example, when the government health-care insurance program for the poor cut costs by disallowing payments for some visits to physicians, patients with advanced illness later presented themselves at hospital emergency rooms in increased numbers.

The argument proceeds by:

a. Showing that shifting costs onto the patient contradicts the premise of health-care reimbursement

b. attributing without justification fraudulent intent to people

c. employing an analogy to characterize interrelationships

d. denying the possibility of a solution by disparaging each possible alternative system

e. demonstrating that cooperation is feasible by citing an instance

Source: LSAT

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[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2017, 08:00
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nightblade354 wrote:
Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs cannot be found within the current piecemeal system of paying these costs. The reason is that this system gives health-care providers and insurers every incentive to shift, wherever possible, the costs of treating illness onto each other or any other party, including the patient. That clearly is the lesson of the various reforms of the 1980s: push in on one part of this pliable spending balloon and an equally expensive bulge pops up elsewhere. For example, when the government health-care insurance program for the poor cut costs by disallowing payments for some visits to physicians, patients with advanced illness later presented themselves at hospital emergency rooms in increased numbers.

The argument proceeds by:

a. Showing that shifting costs onto the patient contradicts the premise of health-care reimbursement

b. attributing without justification fraudulent intent to people

c. employing an analogy to characterize interrelationships

d. denying the possibility of a solution by disparaging each possible alternative system

e. demonstrating that cooperation is feasible by citing an instance

Source: LSAT

Kudos will be given for all correct responses submitted before the reveal of the OA!



Hi...
the PARA generally talks of passing of costs to each other in case of any changes in system.
Later an example or analogy is given to show that if costs are cut by govt in specific areas, new and higher bills are observed in other areas relatively.

so it is an analogy to talk of interrelationship

C
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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2017, 08:33
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The author states that costs cannot be reduced with the current system of paying for these costs. He then provides a reason as to why it is so. To compare, the author then cites the various reforms of 1980s. To support this analogy he gives an example to show the interrelationship.

Hence option C.

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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno   [#permalink] 26 Oct 2017, 08:33
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Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno

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