It is currently 20 Feb 2018, 09:50

Live Now:

Ace the Booth Interview - Live on YouTube


Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

3 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 22 Jun 2013
Posts: 39
Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2014, 12:06
3
This post received
KUDOS
12
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  75% (hard)

Question Stats:

51% (01:11) correct 49% (01:15) wrong based on 459 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel, considerably lighter because the organic composition is less dense than the metallic elements.

A. Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel

B. Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight

C. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel

D. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk, much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight

E. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 22 Jun 2013
Posts: 39
Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2014, 12:13
The answer provided by Mangoosh is E
But I am more towards C

My doubt is :
What should the non-underlined portion after the comma be modifying ?
, considerably lighter because the organic composition is less dense than the metallic elements.

For me Considerably lighter can be Steel only and not weight
Weight can be more or less
But is the usage of lighter for weight correct ?

Please clarify

Thank you
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 05 Sep 2010
Posts: 829
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2014, 20:06
Quote:
The answer provided by Mangoosh is E
But I am more towards C


the answer has to be E
C is wrong because C creates ambiguity

Quote:
My doubt is :
What should the non-underlined portion after the comma be modifying ?
, considerably lighter because the organic composition is less dense than the metallic elements.


this is not the case as the construction "considerably lighter because the organic composition is less dense than the metallic elements" modifies the complete previous clause and not just the "noun" before the comma !!
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 15 Jul 2012
Posts: 37
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2014, 02:55
niyantg wrote:
Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel, considerably lighter because the organic composition is less dense than the metallic elements.

A. Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel

B. Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight

C. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel

D. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk, much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight

E. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight


narrowed down to C and E

can someone explain the difference between these choices?
how is one better than the other
2 KUDOS received
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 05 Sep 2010
Posts: 829
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2014, 03:07
2
This post received
KUDOS
Quote:
narrowed down to C and E

can someone explain the difference between these choices


i have already explained as why C is wrong . i will elaborate as why C is ambiguous
C says :Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel

meaning 1 : Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than [the weight] high-grade alloy steel

meaning 2 : Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel [is at holding its own weight]

is it clear now?
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 02 Dec 2012
Posts: 24
Re: Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2014, 08:02
niyantg wrote:
Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel, considerably lighter because the organic composition is less dense than the metallic elements.

A. Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel

B. Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight

C. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel

D. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk, much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight

E. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight


My answer is E.
While I am clear on the comparison part [for reasons similar to what Aditya has explained above], I am not clear on how the non-underlined part is modifying spider's silk. What is the principle involved here?
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 24 Mar 2010
Posts: 114
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Aug 2014, 20:29
niyantg wrote:
The answer provided by Mangoosh is E
But I am more towards C

My doubt is :
What should the non-underlined portion after the comma be modifying ?
, considerably lighter because the organic composition is less dense than the metallic elements.

For me Considerably lighter can be Steel only and not weight
Weight can be more or less
But is the usage of lighter for weight correct ?

Please clarify

Thank you


The sentence compares “spider's silk” with “high-grade alloy steel”:
- They are comparable in tensile strength
- But: spider’s silk is much better than high-grad alloy steel at holding its own weight.
Then the sentence continues to describe that spider’s weight is considerably lighter because the organic composition is less dense than the metallic elements.
The non-underlined part “considerably lighter because…” modifies weight in “its own weight”.

A) “Comparing tensile strength” gives the idea that tensile strength is being compared with other strength. 2) “considerably lighter because…” modifies “high-grade alloy steel”  Incorrect
B) “Comparing tensile strength” gives the idea that tensile strength is being compared with other strength. Incorrect
C) “considerably lighter because…” modifies “high-grade alloy steel”  Incorrect
D) This choice makes the sentence lack of the main verb  Incorrect
E) Correct comparison and modifier  Correct

Hope it helps.
_________________

Start to fall in love with GMAT <3

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 24 Mar 2010
Posts: 114
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Aug 2014, 20:41
aditya8062 wrote:
Quote:
narrowed down to C and E

can someone explain the difference between these choices


i have already explained as why C is wrong . i will elaborate as why C is ambiguous
C says :Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel

meaning 1 : Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than [the weight] high-grade alloy steel

meaning 2 : Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel [is at holding its own weight]

is it clear now?



Hi aditya8062,

Hmm, I don't think that I agree with you in this point: meaning 1 : Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than [the weight] high-grade alloy steel

Why spider's silk should hold high-grade alloy steel's weight? It's illogical. Thus, the comparison spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel clearly means that spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel [is at holding its own weight]. C is not ambiguous in comparison but is incorrect because of the modifier (as I mentioned in my previous post).

Best,
Lucy
_________________

Start to fall in love with GMAT <3

Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10323
Premium Member
Re: Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Oct 2015, 03:21
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
Expert Post
3 KUDOS received
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4680
Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Nov 2015, 10:29
3
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
LucyDang wrote:
Hi aditya8062,

Hmm, I don't think that I agree with you in this point: meaning 1 : Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than [the weight] high-grade alloy steel

Why spider's silk should hold high-grade alloy steel's weight? It's illogical. Thus, the comparison spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel clearly means that spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel [is at holding its own weight]. C is not ambiguous in comparison but is incorrect because of the modifier (as I mentioned in my previous post).

Best,
Lucy

Dear Lucy,
I'm happy to respond. :-) I am the author of this particular Magoosh question.

This is a funny thing about grammar. Consider the sentence:
I like Chinese food more than my friend Chris.
The ambiguity: this could be
1) a subjective comparison = comparing "Chris" to the subject, "I"; "Chris" would be the subject in the parallel clause
2) an objective comparison = comparing "Chris" to the direct object "pizza"; "Chris" would be the direct object in the parallel clause
Now, if you don't know anything at all about me and Chris, it is conceivable that the objective comparison is intended. In other words, I might be so passionate about Chinese food that I have more affection for this cuisine than I have for Chris. That is one reading.
By contrast, if you know the two of us, our good friendship, and Chris's relative disinterest in Chinese food, then the other reading, the subjective comparison appears as correct. Notice, though, we needed outside information to clarify the grammar. That's not a well-constructed sentence, if I need to go outside the sentence to determine what the grammar is intending to say.

Much in the same way, if we look at the (C) version of this sentence:
Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel
The grammar leaves open both the subjective & objective comparisons as possibilities. Again, we could use our physical science knowledge of materials in the real world to deduce that the subjective comparison must be intended, but again, we had to go outside the sentence to make this decision. If the grammar itself leaves open a logical ambiguity, then it is not a well constructed sentence, no matter how easy it may be to resolve the ambiguity by other means.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Status: Always try to face your worst fear because nothing GOOD comes easy. You must be UNCOMFORTABLE to get to your COMFORT ZONE
Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Posts: 352
Concentration: Marketing, Technology
GMAT 1: 570 Q44 V25
GMAT 2: 600 Q48 V25
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Apr 2016, 21:36
niyantg wrote:
Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel, considerably lighter because the organic composition is less dense than the metallic elements.

A. Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel

B. Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight

C. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel

D. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk, much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight

E. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight


Can Someone explain why option B is wrong
_________________

"When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you’ll be successful.” - Eric Thomas

I need to work on timing badly!!

Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
D
Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 5658
Re: Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Apr 2016, 22:03
Expert's post
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
smartguy595 wrote:
niyantg wrote:
Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel, considerably lighter because the organic composition is less dense than the metallic elements.

A. Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel

B. Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight

C. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel

D. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk, much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight

E. Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better than high-grade alloy steel at holding its own weight


Can Someone explain why option B is wrong


two flaws--
1) Modifier problem -- comparing this with that, the scientist did ...
so comparing requires some person carrying out the comparing as a modifier...
spider's silk is not carrying out COMPARING..

2) what are you comparing tensile strength WITH-?
_________________

Absolute modulus :http://gmatclub.com/forum/absolute-modulus-a-better-understanding-210849.html#p1622372
Combination of similar and dissimilar things : http://gmatclub.com/forum/topic215915.html


BANGALORE/-

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4680
Re: Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Apr 2016, 08:34
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
smartguy595 wrote:
Can Someone explain why option B is wrong

Dear smartguy595,
I'm the author of the question and I'm happy to respond. :-) I see that chetan2u brought up some good points. To reiterate

1) When a participial phrase begins a sentence, it must be modifying the subject: the subject must be the "doer" of the action of the participle. That is not the case with "comparing" in choice (B).

2) Also, as chetan2u, the nature of the comparison is ambiguous. If some unknown person is "comparing tensile strength,' to what is this unknown agent comparing it.

Does all this make sense?
Mike -)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
D
Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 5658
Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Apr 2016, 08:40
mikemcgarry wrote:
smartguy595 wrote:
Can Someone explain why option B is wrong

Dear smartguy595,
I'm the author of the question and I'm happy to respond. :-) I see that chetan2u brought up some good points. To reiterate

1) When a participial phrase begins a sentence, it must be modifying the subject: the subject must be the "doer" of the action of the participle. That is not the case with "comparing" in choice (B).

2) Also, as chetan2u, the nature of the comparison is ambiguous. If some unknown person is "comparing tensile strength,' to what is this unknown agent comparing it.

Does all this make sense?
Mike -)


Hi Mike,
GOOD Q worthy of 700 level and thankfully I could find the flaw correctly in front of the author..
_________________

Absolute modulus :http://gmatclub.com/forum/absolute-modulus-a-better-understanding-210849.html#p1622372
Combination of similar and dissimilar things : http://gmatclub.com/forum/topic215915.html


BANGALORE/-

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Status: Always try to face your worst fear because nothing GOOD comes easy. You must be UNCOMFORTABLE to get to your COMFORT ZONE
Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Posts: 352
Concentration: Marketing, Technology
GMAT 1: 570 Q44 V25
GMAT 2: 600 Q48 V25
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Apr 2016, 08:49
chetan2u wrote:
mikemcgarry wrote:
smartguy595 wrote:
Can Someone explain why option B is wrong

Dear smartguy595,
I'm the author of the question and I'm happy to respond. :-) I see that chetan2u brought up some good points. To reiterate

1) When a participial phrase begins a sentence, it must be modifying the subject: the subject must be the "doer" of the action of the participle. That is not the case with "comparing" in choice (B).

2) Also, as chetan2u, the nature of the comparison is ambiguous. If some unknown person is "comparing tensile strength,' to what is this unknown agent comparing it.

Does all this make sense?
Mike -)


Hi Mike,
GOOD Q worthy of 700 level and thankfully I could find the flaw correctly in front of the author..


Dear mike & chetan2u,

Thank you very much for your inputs :)
_________________

"When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you’ll be successful.” - Eric Thomas

I need to work on timing badly!!

SVP
SVP
avatar
P
Joined: 12 Dec 2016
Posts: 1906
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 700 Q49 V33
GPA: 3.64
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jan 2018, 19:17
test takers must know that the pattern in E is an important because such pattern often appears in 700-lvl questions.
The pattern is the 2 nouns in a comparison must stand next to each other. For example, "spider's silk (first noun) is much better than high-grade alloy steel (second noun) at....
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 23 Oct 2016
Posts: 22
Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jan 2018, 20:20
Hi mike,

I think both C and E are same. C says x is much better at z than y, and E says x is much better than y at z.Here ‘at holding it’s own weight’ modifies either x or y, and that makes x and y comparison same in both C and E. So I think in one of the options it should be mentioned as x at z is much better than y at z. Simply shifting the pronoun doesn’t make sense I think. Please explain

mikemcgarry wrote:
LucyDang wrote:
Hi aditya8062,

Hmm, I don't think that I agree with you in this point: meaning 1 : Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than [the weight] high-grade alloy steel

Why spider's silk should hold high-grade alloy steel's weight? It's illogical. Thus, the comparison spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel clearly means that spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel [is at holding its own weight]. C is not ambiguous in comparison but is incorrect because of the modifier (as I mentioned in my previous post).

Best,
Lucy

Dear Lucy,
I'm happy to respond. :-) I am the author of this particular Magoosh question.

This is a funny thing about grammar. Consider the sentence:
I like Chinese food more than my friend Chris.
The ambiguity: this could be
1) a subjective comparison = comparing "Chris" to the subject, "I"; "Chris" would be the subject in the parallel clause
2) an objective comparison = comparing "Chris" to the direct object "pizza"; "Chris" would be the direct object in the parallel clause
Now, if you don't know anything at all about me and Chris, it is conceivable that the objective comparison is intended. In other words, I might be so passionate about Chinese food that I have more affection for this cuisine than I have for Chris. That is one reading.
By contrast, if you know the two of us, our good friendship, and Chris's relative disinterest in Chinese food, then the other reading, the subjective comparison appears as correct. Notice, though, we needed outside information to clarify the grammar. That's not a well-constructed sentence, if I need to go outside the sentence to determine what the grammar is intending to say.

Much in the same way, if we look at the (C) version of this sentence:
Comparable in tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at holding its own weight than high-grade alloy steel
The grammar leaves open both the subjective & objective comparisons as possibilities. Again, we could use our physical science knowledge of materials in the real world to deduce that the subjective comparison must be intended, but again, we had to go outside the sentence to make this decision. If the grammar itself leaves open a logical ambiguity, then it is not a well constructed sentence, no matter how easy it may be to resolve the ambiguity by other means.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at   [#permalink] 15 Jan 2018, 20:20
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Comparing tensile strength, spider's silk is much better at

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.