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Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards

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Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2017, 21:53
2
6
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

48% (02:28) correct 52% (02:35) wrong based on 431 sessions

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Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards for food product labeling, manufacturers are misleading or deceiving consumers by their product labeling. For example, a certain brand of juice is labeled “fresh orange juice,” yet the product is made from water, concentrate, and flavor enhancers. Since “fresh” as applied to food products is commonly understood to mean pure and unprocessed, labeling that orange juice “fresh” is unquestionably deceptive.

Manufacturer: Using words somewhat differently than they are commonly used is not deceptive. After all, “fresh” can also mean never frozen. We cannot be faulted for failing to comply with standards that have not been officially formulated. When the government sets clear standards pertaining to product labeling, we will certainly comply with them.

Which one of the following principles, if established, would contribute most to a defense of the manufacturer’s position against that of the consumer advocate?

(A) In the absence of government definitions for terms used in product labeling, common standards of understanding alone should apply.

(B) Government standards for truthful labeling should always be designed to reflect common standards of understanding.

(C) People should be free, to the extent that it is legal to do so, to exploit to their advantages the inherent ambiguity and vagueness in language.

(D) When government standards and common standards for truthful labeling are incompatible with each other, the government standards should always take precedence.

(E) In their interpretation of language, consumers should never presume that vagueness indicates an attempt to deceive on the part of manufacturers unless those manufacturers would reap large benefits from successful deception.

Source: LSAT

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Re: Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2017, 22:31
broall wrote:
Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards for food product labeling, manufacturers are misleading or deceiving consumers by their product labeling. For example, a certain brand of juice is labeled “fresh orange juice,” yet the product is made from water, concentrate, and flavor enhancers. Since “fresh” as applied to food products is commonly understood to mean pure and unprocessed, labeling that orange juice “fresh” is unquestionably deceptive.

Manufacturer: Using words somewhat differently than they are commonly used is not deceptive. After all, “fresh” can also mean never frozen. We cannot be faulted for failing to comply with standards that have not been officially formulated. When the government sets clear standards pertaining to product labeling, we will certainly comply with them.

Which one of the following principles, if established, would contribute most to a defense of the manufacturer’s position against that of the consumer advocate?

(A) In the absence of government definitions for terms used in product labeling, common standards of understanding alone should apply.

(B) Government standards for truthful labeling should always be designed to reflect common standards of understanding.

(C) People should be free, to the extent that it is legal to do so, to exploit to their advantages the inherent ambiguity and vagueness in language.

(D) When government standards and common standards for truthful labeling are incompatible with each other, the government standards should always take precedence.

(E) In their interpretation of language, consumers should never presume that vagueness indicates an attempt to deceive on the part of manufacturers unless those manufacturers would reap large benefits from successful deception.

Source: LSAT


I will go with C here ..
It supports the manufacturer point of view ...one can exploit the language , if doing so is legal ...
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Re: Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2017, 07:10
I think A also fits. Not sure why there should be a preference to C just because its more assertive.
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Re: Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2017, 20:05
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sobby wrote:
broall wrote:
Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards for food product labeling, manufacturers are misleading or deceiving consumers by their product labeling. For example, a certain brand of juice is labeled “fresh orange juice,” yet the product is made from water, concentrate, and flavor enhancers. Since “fresh” as applied to food products is commonly understood to mean pure and unprocessed, labeling that orange juice “fresh” is unquestionably deceptive.

Manufacturer: Using words somewhat differently than they are commonly used is not deceptive. After all, “fresh” can also mean never frozen. We cannot be faulted for failing to comply with standards that have not been officially formulated. When the government sets clear standards pertaining to product labeling, we will certainly comply with them.

Which one of the following principles, if established, would contribute most to a defense of the manufacturer’s position against that of the consumer advocate?

(A) In the absence of government definitions for terms used in product labeling, common standards of understanding alone should apply.

(B) Government standards for truthful labeling should always be designed to reflect common standards of understanding.

(C) People should be free, to the extent that it is legal to do so, to exploit to their advantages the inherent ambiguity and vagueness in language.

(D) When government standards and common standards for truthful labeling are incompatible with each other, the government standards should always take precedence.

(E) In their interpretation of language, consumers should never presume that vagueness indicates an attempt to deceive on the part of manufacturers unless those manufacturers would reap large benefits from successful deception.

Source: LSAT


I will go with C here ..
It supports the manufacturer point of view ...one can exploit the language , if doing so is legal ...


Yes i think its C
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Re: Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2017, 11:11
How B option is ruled out when it supports the manufacturer’s position?
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Re: Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Oct 2017, 23:44
(B) Government standards for truthful labeling should always be designed to reflect common standards of understanding.

This option cannot support manufacturer stand point.
if we consider the consumer advocate procedure he says "fresh means unprocessed" where as manufacturer says "it never mean unfrozen"
I believe the manufacturer agrees with the consumer advocate but provides a conclusion that favors the manufacturer.
So i short option (B) supports the consumer advocate more than the manufacturer.
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Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Oct 2017, 23:47
narendra111988 wrote:
I think A also fits. Not sure why there should be a preference to C just because its more assertive.


common standards relates to consumer advocate's argument since the manufacturer doesn't refute the consumer advocate in his argument instead he provides a different explaination.

hence, option A is more inclined towards the consumer advocate than the manufacturer.
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Re: Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2017, 01:37
I would also go with A. It states that in absence of Government rules, common sense can be used which is in favour of Manufacturer.

C option is also close one. But I rejected it because gives a negative impression in manufacturer's say.

Hence A is correct according to me

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Re: Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2017, 02:51
I feel D is correct because questions ask for "Which one of the following principles, if established, ", D is the one which establishes such a rule and supports the argument and avoids the ambiguity.

(A) seems to be incorrect because it talks about "Common standards in the absence", the entire argument itself is based on missing a common standard.
(C) seems incorrect because manufacturer argues that there is no deception from their side, they merely assumed another meaning of "Fresh", so C contradict wit that.
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Re: Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2017, 09:56
Why not option E ?! It refutes the accusation of the consumer advocate that vagueness doesn't necessarily mean deception.
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Re: Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Oct 2018, 04:24
Hi broall
If u have OE for this question, please post it. This was a tough question.

Thanks
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Re: Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Feb 2019, 11:29
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Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards for food product labeling, manufacturers are misleading or deceiving consumers by their product labeling. For example, a certain brand of juice is labeled “fresh orange juice,” yet the product is made from water, concentrate, and flavor enhancers. Since “fresh” as applied to food products is commonly understood to mean pure and unprocessed, labeling that orange juice “fresh” is unquestionably deceptive.

Manufacturer: Using words somewhat differently than they are commonly used is not deceptive. After all, “fresh” can also mean never frozen. We cannot be faulted for failing to comply with standards that have not been officially formulated. When the government sets clear standards pertaining to product labeling, we will certainly comply with them.

Consumer Advocate:
Core- This product is deceptively labeled because "Fresh" is commonly understood to mean pure and unprocessed but this product is not.

Manufacturer:
Core: The product is not deceptively labeled because "Fresh" can also mean "never frozen"

Which one of the following principles, if established, would contribute most to a defense of the manufacturer’s position against that of the consumer advocate?

(A) In the absence of government definitions for terms used in product labeling, common standards of understanding alone should apply.-- opposite - this goes against the manufacturer's position

(B) Government standards for truthful labeling should always be designed to reflect common standards of understanding. -- irrelevant- If government standards come in the future, the manufacturer will comply

(C) People should be free, to the extent that it is legal to do so, to exploit to their advantages the inherent ambiguity and vagueness in language. - Correct; This is what the manufacturer does 'Using words somewhat differently than they are commonly used is not deceptive'

(D) When government standards and common standards for truthful labeling are incompatible with each other, the government standards should always take precedence. - irrelevant; If government standards come in the future, the manufacturer will comply

(E) In their interpretation of language, consumers should never presume that vagueness indicates an attempt to deceive on the part of manufacturers unless those manufacturers would reap large benefits from successful deception.- incorrect; Firstly we are not provided enough information to determine whether these manufacturers have reaped large benefits. If these manufacturers have indeed reaped large benefits, then this goes against the manufacturer's claim

Answer C
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Re: Consumer advocate: Under the current absence of government standards   [#permalink] 03 Feb 2019, 11:29
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