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Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service economy is

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Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service economy is  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 16 Jan 2019, 03:17
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Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service economy is leading neither to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, or displacing the physical production of goods.


(A) leading neither to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, or

(B) leading neither to lower standards of living nor a more unequal distribution of income, or

(C) not leading to either lower standards of living nor to more of an unequal distribution of income, and neither is it

(D) not leading to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, and it is not

(E) not leading to lower standards of living or to a more unequal distribution of income, nor is it

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Originally posted by spiridon on 04 Dec 2008, 12:57.
Last edited by Bunuel on 16 Jan 2019, 03:17, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2010, 12:03
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The thumb rule to remember here is that in formal writing, we use neither-nor/either – or constructions only when two issues are involved. For more than two issues, as in the given case, neither-nor/either–or constructions are considered unidiomatic. Thus we can eliminate such choices as the first step, namely A, B and C.

In D, the construction is unparallel; when we say not leading to in one place, we must also say to more of blah, blah in the other place to keep parallelism. Secondly the last event and it is not displacing the physical production of goods is presented as a separate one, independent of the prior series. In that case, the series consisting of the two arms i.e. lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, should be joined by a suitable conjunction such as or.

Choice E handles these anomalies effectively and is the right answer
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Re: Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service economy is  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2008, 14:22
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spiridon wrote:
Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service economy is leading neither to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, or displacing the physical production of goods.

(A) leading neither to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, or
(B) leading neither to lower standards of living nor a more unequal distribution of income, or
(C) not leading to either lower standards of living nor to more of an unequal distribution of income, and neither is it
(D) not leading to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, and it is not
(E) not leading to lower standards of living or to a more unequal distribution of income, nor is it



E

A-Neither or is incorrect . It must be Neither X , Nor Y -X and Y must be grammatically and logically parallel

B- Idiom is right but X and Y are not parallel

C-Either Nor is incorrect

D- Not X, More Y and Z and X, Y and Z are no way parallel

E- very imp

Nor, or can be used individually also

Nor for negative connotations, such as this statement

Or for positive connotations

and most imo when we used them idividually, there is an inversion e.g. "is it" ( normally we write "it is")

also "Leading" parallels "displacing"

Choose E
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Re: Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Oct 2010, 16:35
Given:
the movement toward a service economy is leading neither to X, <more of an unequal distribution of income>, or Y.

<more of an unequal distribution of income> modifies X

->the movement toward a service economy is leading neither to X or displacing Y.

The idiom is neither X nor Y


B. leading neither to lower standards of living nor a more unequal distribution of income, or
>>leading neither to X nor Z, or displacing Y.
undiomatic

C. not leading to either lower standards of living nor to more of an unequal distribution of income, and neither is it
>>wrong usage of "either"

D. not leading to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, and it is not
>>undiomatic
idiom not X or Y

E. not leading to lower standards of living or to a more unequal distribution of income, nor is it
>>idiomatic
not leading to X or Y, nor is it Y
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Re: Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2012, 00:22
I dint understand the Answer, can someone please tell me the OA
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Re: Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2012, 02:46
magicmanisha wrote:
I dint understand the Answer, can someone please tell me the OA


Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service economy is leading neither to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, or displacing the physical production of goods.
(A) leading neither to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, or
(B) leading neither to lower standards of living nor a more unequal distribution of income, or
(C) not leading to either lower standards of living nor to more of an unequal distribution of income, and neither is it
(D) not leading to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, and it is not
(E) not leading to lower standards of living or to a more unequal distribution of income, nor is it

Nowhere they have used the correct idiom i.e. 'neither nor'

Here dont look for just the idiom. Look at the sentence as well. A,C and D can be ruled out because both the idiom usage and the sentence construction are wrong.
B has the correct idiom but 'or' after the comma does not give the correct meaning to the sentence.
E fits best.

Hope this helps.

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Re: Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service economy is  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Oct 2014, 00:43
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First, B is wrong because you can't say "neither . . . or"--you need "nor." However, the flaw in parallelism isn't between "leading" and "displacing," but between "neither to lower standards" and "nor a more unequal distribution."

We need to say "This leads neither to X nor to Y" or "This leads to neither X nor Y." This is a general rule of parallelism. It's the same principle that make this wrong:

I don't like my new laptop because it is buggy, cumbersome, and it is crash-prone.

I should say "it is buggy, cumbersome, and crash-prone," or (if I must) "it is buggy, it is cumbersome, and it is crash-prone." (This latter approach, which uses repetition for emphasis, would be more likely to show up in a speech or an essay than on an SC problem.) In any case, do you see the issue? Since "neither . . . nor" serves as our pair of parallelism markers, the items after those markers need to match precisely. An extra part of speech, such as a preposition ("to") or a pronoun ("it") breaks the parallelism spell!
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Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Nov 2015, 01:07
rajathpanta wrote:
magicmanisha wrote:
I dint understand the Answer, can someone please tell me the OA


Contrary to popular opinion, the movement toward a service economy is leading neither to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, or displacing the physical production of goods.
(A) leading neither to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, or
(B) leading neither to lower standards of living nor a more unequal distribution of income, or
(C) not leading to either lower standards of living nor to more of an unequal distribution of income, and neither is it
(D) not leading to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, and it is not
(E) not leading to lower standards of living or to a more unequal distribution of income, nor is it

Nowhere they have used the correct idiom i.e. 'neither nor'

Here dont look for just the idiom. Look at the sentence as well. A,C and D can be ruled out because both the idiom usage and the sentence construction are wrong.
B has the correct idiom but 'or' after the comma does not give the correct meaning to the sentence.
E fits best.

Hope this helps.


It is right that GMAT seldom test idiom, so better ignore them unless nothing else can be considered!

OA is E, and let's analyze the options from the parallelism angle: this is a dual-level parallel question.
The context is saying that the "movement" is not leading to two bad results, and it is not displacing sth. that originally existed.
The two bad results are: (1) lower standards of living. (2) an unequal distribution of income.
(Use our common macro-economic sense, and we know that the two issues are parallel, since either issue cannot explain the other.)

(A) leading neither to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, or
Wrong.
(1) "more of" means "the thing mentioned above really looks like blablabla". However, the latter is not used to explain the former.
(2) They are not parallel.

(B) leading neither to lower standards of living nor a more unequal distribution of income, or
Wrong.
(1) The structures "neither to lower standards of living" and "nor a more unequal distribution" are not parallel. A "to" in the latter is missing in the latter.
(2) Here the relationship of "leading" and "displacing" is wrong: This option is saying that one of them will occur (see "or" ), but in fact both will occur.

(C) not leading to either lower standards of living nor to more of an unequal distribution of income, and neither is it
Wrong.
(1) The structures "to either lower standards of living" and "nor to more of an unequal distribution" are not parallel.
(2) "and neither" looks really redundant. "neither" itself is enough.

(D) not leading to lower standards of living, more of an unequal distribution of income, and it is not
Wrong.
(1) "more of" means "the thing mentioned above really looks like blablabla". However, the latter is not used to explain the former.
(2) Since this is a negative description, we do not prefer "and it is not". "nor" will be better.

(E) not leading to lower standards of living or to a more unequal distribution of income, nor is it
Correct.
Note that "nor is it" is an inversion.

BTW, seriously, by simply looking at the end of the sentence and considering the relationship between "leading" and "replacing", we can cross out "or" and "and". Then OA is E.
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