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Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounts to a sum

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Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounts to a sum  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2020, 23:40
GMATNinja wrote:
Aviral1995 wrote:
GMATNinja VeritasKarishma GMATNinjatwo please help me with this question!

In short, (A) and (B) are gone right off the bat because they have subject-verb errors.

As for (C), (D), and (E), first consider the following two options:

    1) I have lower than fifty dollars in my account.
    2) I have less than fifty dollars in my account.

Which is correct? It's the latter -- we use greater than/less than to compare amounts of money. Similarly, we would say, "I have less than one percent of $5,000 in my account." (C) is the best choice for the same reason.

If you still have questions, you might want to review this entire thread -- some of the older posts might help. If not, let us know what's tripping you up! You also might want to check out this post for more on "less than" vs. "lower than".

I hope that helps!


Thankyou so much GMATNinja ..i really like your explanation!!

You mean to say that we are using less than 50 dollar to compare dollar as a non-countable unit.
If we say fewer than 50 dollars , we are counting the notes of dollar which are 50 in number

Let me know if i am missing anything!
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Re: Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounts to a sum  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2020, 05:20
Dear Friends,

Here is a detailed explanation to this question-

spriya wrote:
Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounts to a sum lower than one percent of the $541 billion the nation spent on health care last year, doctors say fear of lawsuits plays major role in health-care inflation.

(A) amounts to a sum lower
(B) amounts to less
(C) amounted to less
(D) amounted to lower
(E) amounted to a lower sum


Choice A: In Option A, we see a subject-verb disagreement between "amounts" and "a sum". Thus, Option A is incorrect.

Choice B: Option B displays the same flaw that Option A does. Thus, Option B is incorrect.

Choice C: Option C maintains correct idiomatic usage and subject-verb agreement. Thus, Option C is correct.

Choice D: In Option D, the sentence compares two amounts. As "amount" is uncountable, the correct adjective to use here is "less" rather than "lower'. Thus, Option D is incorrect.

Choice E: In Option E, using both "amounted to" and "sum" is redundant; when the verb “amounted to” is used, it is understood that that the end result will be a sum. Thus, E is not a good answer choice.

Hence, C is the best answer choice.

To understand the concept of “Collective, Countable, and Uncountable nouns on GMAT”, you may want to watch the following video (~2 minutes):



All the best!
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Re: Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounts to a sum  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jan 2020, 19:35
Aviral1995 wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
Aviral1995 wrote:
GMATNinja VeritasKarishma GMATNinjatwo please help me with this question!

In short, (A) and (B) are gone right off the bat because they have subject-verb errors.

As for (C), (D), and (E), first consider the following two options:

    1) I have lower than fifty dollars in my account.
    2) I have less than fifty dollars in my account.

Which is correct? It's the latter -- we use greater than/less than to compare amounts of money. Similarly, we would say, "I have less than one percent of $5,000 in my account." (C) is the best choice for the same reason.

If you still have questions, you might want to review this entire thread -- some of the older posts might help. If not, let us know what's tripping you up! You also might want to check out this post for more on "less than" vs. "lower than".

I hope that helps!


Thankyou so much GMATNinja ..i really like your explanation!!

You mean to say that we are using less than 50 dollar to compare dollar as a non-countable unit.
If we say fewer than 50 dollars , we are counting the notes of dollar which are 50 in number

Let me know if i am missing anything!

Exactly - if I have $47.65, then I have less than $50, as the value of money doesn't have to be in integer form.

But if I have 47 dollar bills, then I have fewer than 50 dollar bills, as the number of bills can only be expressed as an integer.

Nice work! And if you really want more on countable vs. non-countable modifiers, here's an excessive video on the topic. :)
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Re: Even though the direct costs of malpractice disputes amounts to a sum   [#permalink] 23 Jan 2020, 19:35

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