GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 03 Aug 2020, 19:22

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 12 Jul 2016
Posts: 20
Re: Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 May 2020, 12:29
GMATCoachBen wrote:
akshaygundeti wrote:
generis wrote:
Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees, the city's projected deficit for the next budget year is getting worse: administration officials announced that they believe the gap will be $3.7 billion, a billion dollars over what it was predicted just two months ago.

A) over what it was predicted

B) over the prediction from

C) more than it was predicted

D) more than they had predicted

E) more than they predicted it


SC25540.02


I don't understand why the usage of they to refer to administrative officials is correct.

How do we know for sure that it was the administrative officials who predicted the gap two months ago. VeritasKarishma egmat

Also would the following construction be correct?

...a billion dollars more than what was predicted just two months ago


akshaygundeti, good questions.

1) "they" is not ambiguous here. Ask yourself: what else would "they" refer to? In the previous clause, "they" refers to officials, and again in the final clause. In general, it is good to confirm that the same pronoun correctly refers to the same antecedent.

Here's an official example of one that is incorrect -- "it" refers to 2 different things (https://gmatclub.com/forum/heavy-commit ... 10136.html):
"Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear." (note: "them" correctly refers to "signs" -- there are no other plural nouns that "them" could refer to).

2) Yes, using "what" instead of "they" is also acceptable, but it's better to use past perfect tense here, since it happened before the other past tense verb "announced". Also, in general it's better to use the active voice and specify who is doing the action.

For example:
Joe decided to play.
The decision to play was made.

Also note that past tense communication verbs, which also include the word "that", are a common pattern that creates a past perfect tense:
The company reported that they had made mistakes.
Joe claimed that he had closed the door.


GMATCoachBen appreciate the explanation. It does answer the 2nd part. But I'm still unclear on how we are sure that it was the administrative officials who predicted the gap two months ago. It could very well be someone else who predicted it back then but its the officials who now believe that the gap would be much more. Isn't there an inherent assumption we are making here when we say they had predicted?
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 01 Nov 2012
Posts: 6
Re: Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 May 2020, 14:25
GMATNinja wrote:
Harsh2111s wrote:
generis wrote:
Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees, the city's projected deficit for the next budget year is getting worse: administration officials announced that they believe the gap will be $3.7 billion, a billion dollars over what it was predicted just two months ago.

A) over what it was predicted

B) over the prediction from

C) more than it was predicted

D) more than they had predicted

E) more than they predicted it


SC25540.02


GMATNinja or any experts

In option C, "it" is correctly referring to the only singular "gap".
Why option C is wrong ?

I choose D but still confused why not C ?

You can say that the gap was predicted TO BE $2.7 billion. But you couldn't say that the gap was predicted $2.7 billion - clearly we need the "to be".

We have something similar in choice (C).

It would be one thing if we had: "...they believe the gap will be $3.7 billion, a billion dollars more than [the gap] was predicted TO BE just two months ago."
Instead, we have "...they believe the gap will be $3.7 billion, a billion dollars more than [the gap] was predicted just two months ago."

It makes sense to compare the gap to what the gap was predicted TO BE. But it does not make sense to compare the gap to what the gap was PREDICTED.

I hope that helps a bit!


hi GMATNinja,

in choice D, can we say "more than what they had predicted"? when can we omit "what"?

"after the second world war, the city of Cologne started the repairing of the historical Cathedral, a project that took almost a decade to finish and that; the Bild, the largest daily, described as the most expensive repair undertaken ever." we certainly can't omit "that" here. how is this stucture different from "more than what they had predicted"? thank you!
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Status: Professional GMAT Trainer
Affiliations: GMAT Coach
Joined: 21 Mar 2017
Posts: 94
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V44
GMAT 2: 770 Q51 V44
GMAT 3: 770 Q50 V44
GMAT 4: 770 Q50 V45 (Online)
Re: Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 May 2020, 17:57
3
akshaygundeti wrote:
GMATCoachBen appreciate the explanation. It does answer the 2nd part. But I'm still unclear on how we are sure that it was the administrative officials who predicted the gap two months ago. It could very well be someone else who predicted it back then but its the officials who now believe that the gap would be much more. Isn't there an inherent assumption we are making here when we say they had predicted?


akshaygundeti, sure, it's theoretically possible that someone else predicted it, but that is not our job to determine -- we only have to determine whether the given meaning is clear and logical. The basic concept behind pronoun ambiguity is we want to avoid ambiguity between two different nouns within our sentence. Here, there is only one plural noun that "they" could refer to, "officials". Furthermore, the first "they" clearly refers to "officials", and by default the 2nd "they" will also refer to the same antecedent, "officials".

Unfortunately, the Pronoun Ambiguity rules are not black and white, and the amount of acceptable ambiguity can vary. As much-revered GMATNinja said on a recent problem, "generally, you want to be careful about relying solely on pronoun ambiguity as a reason to eliminate answer choices". (https://gmatclub.com/forum/scientists-c ... ml#p241818) He has a great video on Pronouns with more details: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhN_KU1bSKU

I've also attached an excellent overview of Pronoun Ambiguity from Manhattan GMAT's "All the Verbal" book, which is a great resource. (https://amzn.to/2AxIb7m)
Attachments

Manhattan GMAT -- All the Verbal -- Pronoun Ambiguity.png
Manhattan GMAT -- All the Verbal -- Pronoun Ambiguity.png [ 143.71 KiB | Viewed 692 times ]


_________________
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 03 Sep 2018
Posts: 26
Re: Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 May 2020, 20:39
Hi... still unsure why D) doesn't refer back to the what it was previously predicted by using "what".

Should answer choice D) read
"more than what they had predicted" instead of
"more than they had predicted"
Thanks!
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 10780
Location: Pune, India
Re: Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 May 2020, 03:34
2
akshaygundeti wrote:
generis wrote:
Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees, the city's projected deficit for the next budget year is getting worse: administration officials announced that they believe the gap will be $3.7 billion, a billion dollars over what it was predicted just two months ago.

A) over what it was predicted

B) over the prediction from

C) more than it was predicted

D) more than they had predicted

E) more than they predicted it


SC25540.02


I don't understand why the usage of they to refer to administrative officials is correct.

How do we know for sure that it was the administrative officials who predicted the gap two months ago. VeritasKarishma egmat

Also would the following construction be correct?

...a billion dollars more than what was predicted just two months ago


We don't know who predicted and it is not our job to question it. We have to look for the option that is grammatically correct. Option (D) is grammatically correct. The other four options are not correct. The correct option tells us that they had predicted it two months ago - then so be it.
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 26 Apr 2019
Posts: 172
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Leadership
GMAT 1: 690 Q49 V34
GMAT 2: 700 Q49 V36
GMAT 3: 720 Q50 V37
GMAT 4: 740 Q50 V40
GPA: 3.99
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jun 2020, 00:54
more is preferred over "over " , in option pronoun it has no antecedent , in e again pronoun it has no antecedent. everything is fine in d so d is the answer
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 22 Aug 2018
Posts: 59
CAT Tests
Re: Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jun 2020, 08:19
generis wrote:
Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees, the city's projected deficit for the next budget year is getting worse: administration officials announced that they believe the gap will be $3.7 billion, a billion dollars over what it was predicted just two months ago.

A) over what it was predicted

B) over the prediction from

C) more than it was predicted

D) more than they had predicted

E) more than they predicted it


SC25540.02


GMATCoachBen
ChiranjeevSingh
VeritasKarishma
AjiteshArun

I am facing issues in understanding Tense part.

Officials announced that they believe gap will be X dollars. 'Announced' is in past tense, 'believe' is in present tense& 'will be' is used.

I have seen used of 'would' to indicate future projection from the past. However I am unable to understand timeline wrt meaning context in the original sentence. Kindly help

Posted from my mobile device
_________________
STUCKED ON '99'.KEEP REWARDING
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 13 Apr 2019
Posts: 244
Location: India
Schools: Kellogg '22
GMAT 1: 710 Q49 V36
GPA: 3.85
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Jun 2020, 21:49
GMATNinja wrote:
Harsh2111s wrote:
generis wrote:
Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees, the city's projected deficit for the next budget year is getting worse: administration officials announced that they believe the gap will be $3.7 billion, a billion dollars over what it was predicted just two months ago.

A) over what it was predicted

B) over the prediction from

C) more than it was predicted

D) more than they had predicted

E) more than they predicted it


SC25540.02


GMATNinja or any experts

In option C, "it" is correctly referring to the only singular "gap".
Why option C is wrong ?

I choose D but still confused why not C ?

You can say that the gap was predicted TO BE $2.7 billion. But you couldn't say that the gap was predicted $2.7 billion - clearly we need the "to be".

We have something similar in choice (C).

It would be one thing if we had: "...they believe the gap will be $3.7 billion, a billion dollars more than [the gap] was predicted TO BE just two months ago."
Instead, we have "...they believe the gap will be $3.7 billion, a billion dollars more than [the gap] was predicted just two months ago."

It makes sense to compare the gap to what the gap was predicted TO BE. But it does not make sense to compare the gap to what the gap was PREDICTED.

I hope that helps a bit!


GMATNinja could you please elaborate more why "to be" should be added? Is it always the case with predicted?
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 29 May 2020
Posts: 9
Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jul 2020, 06:08
Looking at the question someone had predicted two months back about the gap increasing to x billion dollars.

So we need past perfect because the first action is in simple past... the proposed budget cuts and the city's projected deficit are indicators.

So two months back is an earlier event hence past perfect...HAD + past tense verb.

A- What does it refer to?
B- Wrong construction
C- Same as A
D- Correct choice...use of past perfect
E- Same as A.

Hope that helps.
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Status: Having fun Growing Mental Agility & Toughness (GMAT) ^_^
Joined: 14 Mar 2020
Posts: 70
Mantra: "There is a will, there is a way."
Concentration: Healthcare, Entrepreneurship
CAT Tests
Re: Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Jul 2020, 12:07
The OA is "... the gap will be $3.7 billion, a billion dollars more than they had predicted."
Can I assume that there is an omitted "what" in there?
"... the gap will be $3.7 billion, a billion dollars more than [what] they had predicted."
_________________
Success springs not so much from talents as from consistency.

GMAT questions are to the mind what dumbbells are to the body.
Just as I like Quant, so (too) I enjoy Verbal, an interesting piece of the GMAT puzzle.
My GMAT skill in 2020 is higher than that in 2019. = My GMAT skill is higher in 2020 than (it was) in 2019. = My GMAT skill is higher in 2020 than was the case in 2019.
EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
P
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 1171
Re: Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Jul 2020, 08:33
1
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one thing at a time, and narrow down our options quickly so we know how to answer questions like this when they pop up on the GMAT! To begin, let's take a quick look at the question and highlight any major differences between the options in orange and purple:

Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees, the city's projected deficit for the next budget year is getting worse: administration officials announced that they believe the gap will be $3.7 billion, a billion dollars over what it was predicted just two months ago.

A) over what it was predicted

B) over the prediction from

C) more than it was predicted

D) more than they had predicted

E) more than they predicted it

After a quick glance over the options, we have a couple differences we can focus on:

1. over vs. more than (Idioms)
2. Their endings that are highlighted in purple (Meaning & Pronouns)


Let’s start with #1 on our list, which is an idioms issue. When dealing with numbers, the GMAT prefers that you use “more than” instead of “over.” While saying “over” isn’t necessarily grammatically incorrect, it’s not the preferred option for formal or business writing. Since the GMAT focuses on more formal/business writing, we need to avoid informal idiom usage. So let’s eliminate any that don’t follow the idiom:

A) over what it was predicted

B) over the prediction from

C) more than it was predicted

D) more than they had predicted

E) more than they predicted it

We can eliminate options A & B because they don’t follow the more formal idiom “more than.” Now that we have it narrowed down a bit, let’s tackle #2 on our list. We need to make sure that any pronouns have clear antecedents, the verb tenses make sense, and that the overall meaning is clear to readers:

C) more than it was predicted
This is INCORRECT for a couple reasons. First, because the pronoun “it” doesn’t have a clear antecedent. “It” could be referring back to “the gap” or one of the dollar amounts mentioned earlier. Second, the verb “was predicted” isn’t the best choice here. We’re talking about two actions done by the administration: the announcement that the gap will be $3.7 billion, and the prediction they made two months prior that it would only be $2.7 billion. Since the prediction came first, it should have a past perfect verb tense to go with it!

D) more than they had predicted
This is CORRECT! This option doesn’t have any unclear pronouns (“they” is clearly referring back to the administration). It also uses past perfect tense for “had predicted,” which more clearly shows the order of events.

E) more than they predicted it
This is INCORRECT because “it” is a vague pronoun with no clear antecedent. The past tense “predicted” is also not as good of a verb choice as the past perfect “had predicted.”

There you have it - option D is our winner!

Don’t study for the GMAT. Train for it.
_________________
"Students study. GMAT assassins train."
Image


The Course Used By GMAT Club Moderators To Earn 750+

souvik101990 Score: 760 Q50 V42 ★★★★★
ENGRTOMBA2018 Score: 750 Q49 V44 ★★★★★
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's   [#permalink] 31 Jul 2020, 08:33

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 31 posts ] 

Even with the proposed budget cuts and new taxes and fees the city's

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne