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Ever since the concussion risks associated with playing tackle

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Ever since the concussion risks associated with playing tackle  [#permalink]

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Ever since the concussion risks associated with playing tackle football became more widely known, many parents have elected to sign their children up for sports that were less dangerous, such as soccer or tennis.


A) became more widely known, many parents have elected to sign their children up for sports that were less dangerous, such as

B) became more widely known, many parents have elected to sign up their children for less dangerous sports, including

C) have become more widely known, many parents elected to sign their children up for less dangerous sports, such as

D) have become more widely known, many parents have elected to sign their children up for sports that were less dangerous, including

E) have become more widely known, many parents elected to sign up their children for less dangerous sports, such as[/list]

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Originally posted by XavierAlexander on 06 Jan 2019, 00:05.
Last edited by generis on 06 Jan 2019, 00:35, edited 2 times in total.
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Ever since the concussion risks associated with playing tackle  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 08 Jan 2019, 18:06
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Official Explanation



(A) The past tense were illogically implies that tennis and soccer used to be, but no longer are, less dangerous than football.

(B) CORRECT. The present perfect have elected matches the time marker ever since. Sign their children up and sign up their children are both correct idioms; that split is a red herring. This choice also removes the past-tense verb were found in the original sentence; the wording less dangerous sports correctly indicates that soccer and tennis were and still are less dangerous than tackle football. The word including appears to introduce a comma –ing structure, but comma-including is an exception to the usual rule. This construction is used to introduce examples of the item mentioned before the comma (in this case, sports).

(C) The time marker ever since requires the present perfect tense have elected in order to indicate that parents began enrolling their children in less dangerous sports in the past and continue to do so today. It is incorrect to say ever since something happened, people did something else.

(D) The past tense were illogically implies that tennis and soccer used to be, but no longer are, less dangerous than football.

(E) The time marker ever since requires the present perfect tense have elected in order to indicate that parents began enrolling their children in less dangerous sports in the past and continue to do so today. It is incorrect to say ever since something happened, people did something else.
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Originally posted by XavierAlexander on 06 Jan 2019, 00:07.
Last edited by XavierAlexander on 08 Jan 2019, 18:06, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Ever since the concussion risks associated with playing tackle  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jan 2019, 02:42
Ever since the concussion risks associated with playing tackle football became more widely known, many parents have elected to sign their children up for sports that were less dangerous, such as soccer or tennis.

A) became more widely known, many parents have elected to sign their children up for sports that were less dangerous, such as - "sports that were less dangerous" is incorrect as the fact should still be true since parents began to enroll their kids in tennis and soccer in the past and are still continuing to do so today

B) became more widely known, many parents have elected to sign up their children for less dangerous sports, including - Correct

C) have become more widely known, many parents elected to sign their children up for less dangerous sports, such as - tense issue- present perfect tense needed for "many parents elected"

D) have become more widely known, many parents have elected to sign their children up for sports that were less dangerous, including - same issue with that modifies as in A

E) have become more widely known, many parents elected to sign up their children for less dangerous sports, such as - tense issue- present perfect tense needed for "many parents elected"

Answer B

XavierAlexander wrote:
The core sentence reads: Ever since the risks became known, parents have elected to … . Became and have become are both acceptable in this sentence—either one can logically describe when the continuing time period indicated by ever since began. For example, ever since she has been working out… and ever since she started working out… are both valid constructions.

As per the OE posted above, either present perfect tense or simple past tense is acceptable in the first part of the sentence(Ever since ... widely known), but in opinion, the first part should be in simple past.


AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , MagooshExpert , GMATGuruNY , VeritasPrepBrian , MartyMurray , DmitryFarber , daagh , generis , other experts - please enlighten
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Re: Ever since the concussion risks associated with playing tackle  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jan 2019, 16:50
Though I marked D, the problem with D is that numerous words inserted between sports and including.
...sports that were less dangerous, including.....
When you to present the list or examples, you must keep them attached to what they are referring.
Here sport, including or sports, such as.. is correct.
But after correcting other errors, B is perfect in all senses.
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Ever since the concussion risks associated with playing tackle  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2019, 22:46
Skywalker18 wrote:
Ever since the concussion risks associated with playing tackle football became more widely known, many parents have elected to sign their children up for sports that were less dangerous, such as soccer or tennis.

A) became more widely known, many parents have elected to sign their children up for sports that were less dangerous, such as - "sports that were less dangerous" is incorrect as the fact should still be true since parents began to enroll their kids in tennis and soccer in the past and are still continuing to do so today

B) became more widely known, many parents have elected to sign up their children for less dangerous sports, including - Correct

C) have become more widely known, many parents elected to sign their children up for less dangerous sports, such as - tense issue- present perfect tense needed for "many parents elected"

D) have become more widely known, many parents have elected to sign their children up for sports that were less dangerous, including - same issue with that modifies as in A

E) have become more widely known, many parents elected to sign up their children for less dangerous sports, such as - tense issue- present perfect tense needed for "many parents elected"

Answer B

XavierAlexander wrote:
The core sentence reads: Ever since the risks became known, parents have elected to … . Became and have become are both acceptable in this sentence—either one can logically describe when the continuing time period indicated by ever since began. For example, ever since she has been working out… and ever since she started working out… are both valid constructions.

As per the OE posted above, either present perfect tense or simple past tense is acceptable in the first part of the sentence(Ever since ... widely known), but in opinion, the first part should be in simple past.



Your point is interesting. In some cases, it may make sense to use the present perfect in a clause that begins with "since." For instance, one could potentially argue that the following makes sense.

Since James has been working here, the team has been having much more fun.

I personally am not sure that I like it, but I'm sure that many people, including many English experts, would say that it is OK, as it conveys that ever since an ongoing action started, something else has been going on.

However, the following does not make sense.

Ever since the concussion risks of football have become more widely known, parents have elected to sign their children up for less dangerous sports.

The process of the risks becoming more widely known is not the same as "James has been working here." If James has been working somewhere, he started at a certain point and has been working ever since. The concussion risks becoming more widely known is not a binary change like James not working and then working. It's an ongoing change. It does not make sense to say "Since" an ongoing change. For instance, the following is not optimal.

Ever since it has become increasingly apparent that oil company executives don't care about the environment, local organizations have been forming to protect water supplies.

We would be better off with the following.

As it has become increasingly apparent that oil company executives don't care about the environment, local organizations have been forming to protect water supplies.

Let's use "as" in the concussions sentence.

As the concussion risks of football have become more widely known, parents have elected to sign their children up for less dangerous sports.

That's better, but the second clause does not quite match the first. It might be even better if we show that the parents part is an ongoing change as well.

As the concussion risks of football have become more widely known, the percentage of parents electing to sign their children up for less dangerous sports has increased.

So, the answer seems to be that, while in certain cases it may make sense to use the present perfect in a clause that begins with "since," for the purposes of describing the type of scenario described by the sentence in this question, it probably does not make sense to use the present perfect after "ever since," and it would be better to use "as" than to use "since."
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Re: Ever since the concussion risks associated with playing tackle  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2019, 22:54
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Is this question from the Manhattan Review Company or the Manhattan Prep Company?
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Re: Ever since the concussion risks associated with playing tackle  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2019, 01:34
B is the correct answer
present perfect = has/have + past participle[ed] is correctly used


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Re: Ever since the concussion risks associated with playing tackle &nbs [#permalink] 09 Jan 2019, 01:34
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