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Berkeley Haas MBA Admissions & Related Blogs

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Snaps & Claps: The Story of Berkeley Alums and Shazam’s $400M Apple Ac  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2019, 07:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Snaps & Claps: The Story of Berkeley Alums and Shazam’s $400M Apple Acquisition
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In 2017, Apple announced it would be purchasing the music application Shazam, and in 2018, the roughly $400 million acquisition was finalized. Though you might be familiar with the app, you might be unfamiliar with its story. Specifically, that two of the co-founders, Chris Barton and Philip Inglebrecht, were classmates at UC Berkeley, and the idea of Shazam was developed at the Haas School of Business.

The creation of Shazam
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1999 was the year that UC Berkeley MBA student Chris Barton had the ‘aha’ moment that would change his life forever.

Barton came to Haas with the idea to develop radio-monitoring software, but he didn’t know what the end goal would be. At the time, Barton thought his technology would be best used in radio stations, and worked to figure out

  • How would the technology be used?
  • How would it be applicable in the current market?
  • How would competitors keep pace with their technology?
However, after taking a Strategic Innovation course, taught by Costa Markides, Barton had a realization. Markides’ emphasis on unconventional thinking and innovation in the business world pushed Barton to change his perspective on how his radio-monitoring technology could be used.

In a 2015 interview with Danielle Newnham, co-founder of @fequalsHQ, Barton explained how he adjusted his thinking from a technology suited for radio stations to one that would better serve consumers.

“What if someone could identify the song using the actual sound of the music captured over the mobile phone? Then, they would not need to know what the radio station was playing at all because they would actually identify using the sound of the music itself.”

At that moment, Barton was ready to start Shazam.

Meet Shazam’s dream team
Barton wasted no time founding his new company. Still, he knew he needed help bringing his idea to market, and he began to assemble his dream team.

The result was a team comprised of co-founders Philip Inghelbrecht, Dhiraj Mukherjee, and Avery Wang.

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Inghelbrect attended the Haas School of Business alongside Barton. Inghelbrect has said that earning his MBA in the Bay Area during the late 1990s fostered his passion for technology. He also believes the connections he made and the experiences he had there directly influenced his ability to co-found Shazam.

 

 

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Mukherjee was a long-time friend of Barton’s and an MBA student at Stanford. When assessing who should join the executive team, Inghelbrecht and Barton determined that Mukherjee’s leadership and operational skills were amongst his greatest assets. Inghelbrecht said, “[Dhiraj] brought a lot of product and operational expertise to the business, something I knew very little about. He did so with a calm, zen, and diplomacy.”

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Barton, Inghelbrecht, and Mukherjee needed one final person to complete their dream team: an expert in sound. By leveraging their network of professors from Stanford and Berkeley, they found Avery Wang. Though he earned his PhD in Auditory Scene Analysis at Stanford, Wang said his early exposure of technology began at UC Berkeley.

“I’d constantly pester my parents to take me to the Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley so I could get some computer time on a 10 character-per-second teletype terminal that printed on a roll of paper.”

The timeline of Shazam
Shazam started from humble beginnings, with students who had a vision and foresight but still needed more information to fine-tune their product. The evolution of Shazam came from in-market learnings and opportune changes within the marketplace.

2002: Shazam initially deployed in the U.K. market only, and was known as ‘2580.’ The numeric code represented the phone number consumers could dial to initiate the music recognition process. After a 30-second phone call, a consumer would receive a text message detailing the song title and artist name.

2004: In partnership with the now-defunct San Francisco-based company, Musicphone, Shazam deployed in the U.S. market on the AT&T Wireless network.

2006: Shazam’s product first became monetized in the U.K. and users that initiated a text were charged £0.60 per request, or given the option to pay a flat monthly fee of £4.50.

2008: In 2007, the iPhone was invented, and subsequently, the App Store. In 2008, Shazam launched its free app to the App Store, which allowed users to open iTunes and buy songs directly after Shazam identified them. According to a 2018 article in TechCrunch, Shazam was one of the first apps available in the App Store.

2009: According to CNBC, by 2009, Shazam had been downloaded by more than 10 million users. Roughly 8 percent of consumers purchased a track directly after requesting the song title and artist from Shazam’s app.

2011: CNET reported that Shazam was the4th most downloaded app on the App Store of all time.

2012: Shazam had over 225 million users in more than 200 countries.

2014: The release of Apple’s iOS 8 was a significant turning point for Shazam as the new operating system integrated the music recognition software into Siri’s functionality.

2016: Snapchat integrated Shazam’s technology so users could identify music playing in Snapchat videos by pressing and holding the camera screen.

2017: Apple announced the acquisition of Shazam for $400 million, and in 2018, the purchase was finalized.

Finding inspiration in the right places
The story of Shazam ends prosperously for Chris Barton, Philip Inghelbrecht, Dhiraj Mukherjee, and Avery Wang. But their success isn’t an outlier. It was a result of learning innovation during their MBA studies, ongoing dedication, and their ability to leverage their networks successfully.

The exposure to Berkeley professors and classmates allowed the Shazam leadership team to improve and iterate on their concept, find like-minded people to share their vision, and execute on a product that found massive market success.

Your story is next.

Are you ready to be inspired? If you’re looking to foster your entrepreneurial spirits like Barton and Inglebrecht, learn how Berkeley can help.

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7 Things Every Student Should Know about the MBA Program at Berkeley  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2019, 06:00
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FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 7 Things Every Student Should Know about the MBA Program at Berkeley
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Potential MBA candidates are likely taking a broad approach when choosing the ideal program and school. After all, your time spent obtaining an MBA will impact your day-to-day life, including the content of your education, who you spend your time with, and where you live.

That means looking at everything from curriculum and professors to location and culture to determine which MBA program satisfies your career needs best.

Here are seven reasons why the MBA program at Berkeley is considered a top choice for those striving to strengthen their professional resume and business acumen.

1. Innovative curriculum
Berkeley’s MBA program has one goal in mind: help you develop as a leader who is capable of turning innovation into measurable impact. TheBerkeley Innovative Leader Development (BILD) is a connecting theme that runs through the MBA curriculum. This interdisciplinary approach tobusiness fundamentals guides you to think differently, considering multiple perspectives.

Berkeley pushes its MBA students to go beyond coursework and discussion and to build on your knowledge throughexperiential learning opportunities. You have a choice of 20applied innovation courses--and you’re welcome to take more than one. Through this experience, you’ll get the opportunity to consult with major firms in the Bay Area to take what you learn in class and apply it to working with real Silicon Valley companies.

2. Highly-skilled professors
Berkeley Haas is home to pioneering researchers, expert practitioners, and Nobel Prize recipients. MBA faculty members are more than teachers, they are scholars, researchers, and business leaders who leave a mark on each student they teach.

Our professors go beyond class lectures by requesting case studies, welcoming guest speakers, and challenging students toquestion the status quo during simulations.

Furthermore, Berkeley is proud to be home to five economics professors who have been recognized for their work with the Nobel Prize in Economic Studies:

3. Ever-growing — but established —network
Haas is known for having the smallest class sizes of all top business schools in the nation. Last year, Berkeley welcomed only 291 candidates to its MBA program.

Being a member of a small class means getting a chance to know everyone, forging meaningful connections, and building a strong network. Your class will form the closest circle in your network, but by graduating from Haas, you also have the advantage of becoming part of theBerkeley Alumni Network, which is nearly half a million strong.

The enviable Berkeley Haas alumni network of more than 41,000 is comprised of local and global leaders who stay connected to their alma mater to share insights, advice, contacts, and connections with Haas’ future leaders.

Haas alumni include:

  • Barbara Desoer, CEO of Citibank (MBA, 77)
  • Cathie Lesjak, CFO of Hewlett-Packard (MBA 86)
  • John Hanke, CEO of Niantic Inc. (MBA 96)
  • N. W. Jasper, President and CEO of Dolby Laboratories (MBA 71)
  • Takehiko Nakao, President, Asian Development Bank (MBA 82)
4. Strong emphasis on global learning
Berkeley recognizes the new economy is increasingly global, especially given the growth of borderless digital communities.

MBA candidates can choose to pursue a global MBA, both in the classroom and across the world, through several global learning opportunities:

  • International Business Development (IBD): MBA students help clients from around the world tackle value-enhancing projects, providing experiential learning in international management consulting
  • Global Network for Advanced Management (GNAM): Students can explore how business is done around the globe via this network of top business schools across five continents
  • Exchange program: MBA students have the option to study abroad in their second year in Hong Kong, Spain, France, or England
  • MA in Global Studies: A one-year Masters program that takes an interdisciplinary approach to learning about international issues
5. Distinct culture
Berkeley is known for its distinctive culture thanks, in part, to the diversity in the student body, the curriculum, and the faculty. Your MBA experience and who you become is shaped by our fourDefining Leadership Principles:

  • Question the Status Quo: Challenge convention and speak your mind. Champion bold ideas and take intelligent risks
  • Confidence without Attitude: Make decisions and act with confidence based on evidence and analytics, not arrogance
  • Students Always: Create the foundation for a lifelong pursuit of personal, professional, and intellectual growth
  • Beyond Yourself: Lead ethically and responsibly, which sometimes means putting other interests above your own
We believe the culture we cultivate at Berkeley, as shaped by ourDefining Leadership Principles, creates an environment that promotes and supports teamwork, collaboration, and involvement.

6. Thriving location
Berkeley not only offers students front-row access to a region known for its scenic beauty, sophisticated culture, and engaged communities, it also happens to be located in one of thelargest economies in the world: the Bay Area.

The San Francisco Bay Area is home to more than 2,000 tech companies ⁠— the densest concentration in the world. By taking advantage of programs like the Startup Lab, Haas MBA students have a chance to easily step into this booming world and benefit from incubators filled with innovative minds and trailblazers in the region both during the program and post-graduation.

7. Attractive post-graduation employment statistics
Berkeley’s MBA graduates are proof why Haas ranks among the top business schools for return on investment – in salary alone.

We know top companies seek out Haas graduates because they have a solid foundation ingeneral management fundamentals, as well as the tools to turn vision into reality.

Class of 2018 Employment Report:

  • 94.4%: The percentage of the class who received offers up to three months after graduation from Haas
  • $125,000: Median base annual salary
  • $29,212: Mean sign-on bonus
  • 24.6%: The percentage of the class who entered into consulting
  • Top employers: Adobe, Amazon, Deloitte, Google, Tesla, Ideo, Parthenon
If you’re ready to learn more about the Berkeley Haas experience,schedule a tour orrequest more information today.

 

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Physician-Leader Finds his “It Factor” via Berkeley MBA, Adam Tibble,   [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2019, 10:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Physician-Leader Finds his “It Factor” via Berkeley MBA, Adam Tibble, MD, EMBA 17
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Adam Tibble, MD, EMBA 17, had already proved himself a capable leader before arriving at Berkeley.

As a medical resident, he created an innovative airway device and launched his first startup. As a US Air Force captain, he served two tours in Afghanistan and headed a Critical Care Air Transport Team that evacuated severely wounded soldiers to medical facilities in Germany. As a cardiac anesthesiologist at NorthBay Healthcare in Fairfield, California, he attained the position of director of cardiac anesthesia.

So why would such an accomplished physician pursue a Berkeley MBA?

Simply put, he was in search of his “it factor,” a concept he drew from his pre-med days playing football for the University of Notre Dame.

“I was fascinated by coaches who inspired players to follow them with trust and ferocity,” says Adam, a graduate of the Berkeley MBA for Executives program. “I wanted this ‘it factor’ to help me lead a hospital’s physicians, nurses, and staff, and I believed Berkeley could help me find and develop mine.” Today at age 39 in addition to his director role, Adam serves as NorthBay’s vice chief of staff and as a partner in a promising new medical startup. His time in the Berkeley MBA program helped him gain the business skills, language, and inspiration needed to transform his leadership style and his corner of the healthcare market.

Finding “It”
Courses in finance and data science expanded Adam’s knowledge base and business vocabulary. “In planning meetings, I can now say a term like ‘customer lifetime value’ and it turns some heads. They realize this doctor might actually understand what they’re talking about.”

But it was his training in soft skills such as leadership communication that triggered his ‘it factor.’

The Leadership Communications Immersion Week led by Professor Mark Rittenberg unleashed Adam’s storytelling ability including how and when to express emotion. It has changed the way he leads meetings, shares patient stories, and talks with fellow medical staff. Adam now makes things more interactive so people actually look forward to “Dr. Tibble” meetings.

Executive Leadership, taught by Professor Jennifer Chatman, revealed how to frame his organization’s inspirational story. He uses that framework to motivate others and to position NorthBay strategically in a competitive market.

“It’s simple, really. You tell people what is wrong, what challenges you face, and then you follow up with, but here’s who we are and what we can do,” he says.

Getting Inspired
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His own inspirational story emerged during his Entrepreneurship and Innovation Week when he attended a talk by Dilbert cartoonist Scott Adams, MBA 86. Adams likened successful entrepreneurship to riding horseback through a dark forest while shooting arrows at targets. Although difficult to do, sooner or later, you will hit one.

The metaphor resonated with Adam, who had already seen two of his startup efforts fizzle. The cartoonist’s story reminded him that people rarely succeed on their first, second, or even third tries. So he decided to keep shooting his arrows.

While still in the MBA program, he launched a clinic to treat patients using ketamine, a battlefield anesthetic that is also used in cardiac anesthesiology. Adam’s clinic, however, would use ketamine to help those with depression, PTSD, and other mental health disorders—an off-label use that recent research indicated could prove more effective than conventional treatments.

Unfortunately, his business partner moved out of state and that venture, too, ended.

Going the Distance
Adam recently decided to try again and opened the Klarity Clinic of Northern California. Applying lessons learned at Haas, his new venture offers both ketamine infusions and cosmetic treatments such as Botox injections and laser hair removal. The latter helps to keep the business solvent, and also funds the discounted ketamine treatments the clinic offers veterans and others who may not be able to afford them.

Adam dreams of contributing even more to healthcare and the greater good. The Berkeley MBA program, he says, helped position him for that goal.

“It showed people at my hospital that I was invested in leadership,” he says. “I was tapped to be a credentials chairperson. That evolved into the vice chief of staff role. I believe the MBA program caused these opportunities to come much earlier in my career than they would have otherwise.”

Ready to find your “it” factor? Explore how to supercharge your leadership skills in the Berkeley MBA for Executives.

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Is the Berkeley MBA a Good Fit for You? Ask Yourself these 4 Questions  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2019, 06:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Is the Berkeley MBA a Good Fit for You? Ask Yourself these 4 Questions to Find Out
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Your life is filled with choices. Some—soup or salad with my sandwich at lunch?—are routine. Others—would an MBA help me achieve my career goals?—will have a long-lasting, powerful impact on the course of your career.

Your answer to that second, career-altering question prompts still more questions, like which MBA program can best help you achieve your unique professional goals?

If you’d like to attend one of the best business schools, we can help you make a more informed decision by highlighting what the Berkeley Haas School of Business has to offer.

Your answers to the following four questions will give you a feel for whether the Berkeley MBA program is the right fit.

Question #1: Do you tend to create opportunities for yourself?
You may think of yourself as an intrapraneur, someone within a company who promotes innovative product development and marketing. Or you may consider yourself to be more of an entrepreneur: a person who organizes and operates a business or businesses, taking on financial risks to do that. Both types of professionals grab their professional lives by the horns. Becoming an intrapreneur can boost your career and help you solve business challenges within your organization. This makes you highly desirable and marketable. Becoming an entrepreneur empowers you to create, launch, and run what could be a profitable company.

The Berkeley Haas MBA program is designed to help both intrapreneurs and entrepreneurs become the best versions of their professional selves. We offer hands-on courses, specialized programs, 1:1 mentoring, and the resources to launch and lead. At Berkeley Haas, you’ll learn exactly how to pitch an idea that’s backed by research and gain the confidence to execute it. Immersing yourself in this dynamic learning environment will empower you to develop new connections and create new business opportunities.

Question # 2: Do you challenge conventional business models?
Are you eager to break the business-as-usual mold? Are you itching to challenge conventional wisdom? If your answer is yes, that’s another compelling reason why the Berkeley Haas School of Business may be the right fit for you.

When you enroll in our MBA programs, you’ll study design thinking, a product development model that relies on a post-structuralist humanistic framework for iterating better ideas into reality in stages. Intrapreneurs and entrepreneurs alike are attracted to areas like design thinking that challenge the status quo and make product development a user-informed energetic exchange, rather than a top-down, supply-demand ecosystem. As a Berkeley Haas MBA student, you’ll dig deep into this approach to product development, while developing the leadership skills needed to challenge conventional business models.

Question # 3: Do you value creative collaboration?
While you’re busy creating new business opportunities and challenging conventional business models in your day-to-day professional life, do you find yourself gravitating toward participating in creative collaboration with colleagues? If your answer to this question is yes, you’re perfectly aligned with the philosophy and approach of the Berkeley Haas MBA program.

One of the most salient benefits of enrolling in a full-time MBA program is the opportunity to collaborate with fellow forward-thinking individuals and leaderswho each bring their own set of experiences and values to the table.

With 2,200+ undergraduate and graduate students studying to earn one of six types of business degrees, the Berkeley Haas student experienceis a buzzing laboratory for creative business ideas. Each day provides opportunities to collaborate and be part of a community that brings out the best in each other. Join clubs and affinity groups, take trips, try new things, and have some fun while stretching your leadership skills and cementing lasting relationships.

Explore Berkeley student co-curricular activities.

Question # 4: Do you want to fast-track your career?
While innovation, collaboration, and inspiration form the foundation of what you’ll experience through Berkeley Haas MBA programs, individual career achievements (professional and financial) are important, too. If you want to fast-track your career, earning your MBA from one of the top business schools can be a very effective way to get there.

While you can certainly learn lessons, challenge yourself, and grow on the job within any organization, an immersive MBA experience will expedite your professional growth. Your goal may be to launch innovative products that change the world from within your company. Or perhaps you want to take on a leadership position and be promoted within your organization. Then again, you may want to start your own company and rise to the challenge of entrepreneurship.

To achieve your goals as quickly as possible, you need to build your business expertise and strategic skills. Choose from three program styles designed to fit your lifestyle, while challenging you and empowering you to dream even bigger.

Take the first step to expand your network and opportunities.
For people who naturally have an entrepreneurial mindset, our MBA programs are incredibly empowering and worthwhile. In fact, they’re designed just for leaders like you.

Learn a new way of thinking within a new economy, while positively impacting your career trajectory in the heart of Silicon Valley.

Explore the Berkeley Haas School of Business MBA programs.

 

 

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Haas alum leverages curiosity into a cleantech career  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2019, 10:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Haas alum leverages curiosity into a cleantech career
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It was 1986 and a teenaged Mukund Chavan, EMBA '15, landed on the East Coast from India deeply curious about the technology that was incubating across the country in Silicon Valley.

"There was so much going on with computers, and I was intrigued by that," he says. "It seemed like a natural area of study for me, and once I got into it, I really liked it. So much so that I got my undergraduate degree in computer engineering from Syracuse University and moved to Silicon Valley to work for Intel in 1992."

This impulse to follow his curiosity has served Mukund well throughout his career, sparking the launch of three startups (Hyperion Technologies, Aarohi Communications, and RackWare), a stint at Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), and now, post-MBA, his position as director of hardware engineering at Tesla. Having long worked in the tech field, Mukund did not see a shift to the cleantech arena coming – “but it fits,” he says.

"By the time Tesla came across my radar, it had been around for a while, and I was interested in its mission to accelerate the world's transition to sustainable energy," he says. "It seemed like a good goal to contribute to. I had worked in tech for a long time, and I never thought I'd work for a car company, but I soon realized that it's more like Tesla is a tech company that happens to make cars."

The idea to pursue an MBA began to percolate for Mukund during his tenure at AMD. He suspected the degree could fill in the gaps of his business knowledge and in his research on possible schools, Haas came to the top of his list.

"I was drawn to Berkeley's reputation for rigorous academics and innovation," he says. "And I knew the MBA would round out the practical, 'school-of-hard-knocks' experiences I'd already had with a set of fundamental business tools."

The Berkeley MBA for Executives appealed to Mukund because of its compressed curriculum of 19 months – rather than 36 – and its Friday-Saturday intensives.

"I enjoyed being able to spend all day in the classroom on Fridays and Saturdays, getting one-on-one input from my professors and working collaboratively with fellow students," he says.

During his time at Haas, Mukund was particularly impacted by Professor Jennifer Chatman's Executive Leadership course.

"I appreciated the quantitative approach she took to help us identify our leadership style and strengths using classroom exercises," he says. "I learned that leadership is often about changing the culture of an organization and being aware of how you influence your team."

Mukund also benefited from the EMBA's field immersion experiences at the end of each term, including a week in Napa focused on leadership; another in Silicon Valley dedicated to innovation and entrepreneurship; a visit to Washington, D.C. focused on public policy and business; and an international experience, which brought Mukund to Brazil, where he and his fellow students learned about the Brazilian economy from its banks to its favelas.

The academic work and the immersion experiences required for the EMBA dovetail well with Haas's Defining Leadership Principles, particularly "Students Always" and "Question the Status Quo," according to Mukund.

"You always have to be willing to learn new things and push existing limits, and the EMBA program emphasizes that," he says. "That kind of curiosity defines effective leadership and leads to an effective career."

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Curious About Post-Grad MBA Salary? Learn Which Concentrations Pay the  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2019, 07:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Curious About Post-Grad MBA Salary? Learn Which Concentrations Pay the Highest.
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Advancing in a career and growing wages are two common reasons MBA hopefuls apply to top business schools. Data published by the National Association of Colleges and Employers reveal that the average starting salary for the class of 2019 MBA grads is $84,580, or roughly $25,000more than the starting salary for those who only hold a bachelor's degree.

While this salary difference is already significant, there are opportunities for even higher earning potential, depending on which industry, function, and specialization you select and pursue. Discover which MBA career paths you can choose from, and learn where the highest earning potentials exists.

Highest post-grad MBA salary by industry
According to data from the 2018 MBA program at UC Berkeley, and the242 students who graduated, the median starting salary across all industries and functions was $127,571. Specific sectors fared better than others when it came to opening offers though. Consider the following rankings:

#1: Media and entertainment, mean base salary of $136,667

#2: Technology, mean base salary of $132,784

#3: Consulting, mean base salary of $132,268

#4: Transportation and logistics services, mean base salary of $126,617

#5: Financial services, mean base salary of $125,583

#6: Manufacturing, mean base salary of $121,429

#7: Energy, mean base salary of $120,667

#8: Consumer packaged goods (CPG) and retail, mean base salary of $119,344

#9: Health, BioTech, and Pharma, mean base salary of $114,600

#10: Nonprofit and public sector, mean base salary of $109,125

#11: Real estate, mean base salary of $98,910

Berkeley proprietary data shows that 70% of all students in the 2018 class received sign-on bonuses, with the technology industry offering the highest bonus, averaging $35,337. The industry with the lowest average sign-on bonus of $21,208 was CPG and retail.

Highest paying post-grad MBA salary by function
Within each industry, there are various functions with higher demand and value in the current marketplace. As a result, identifying particular job roles inside highly paying sectors can improve your salary upon graduation from an MBA program as well. According to data from the 2018 graduating class at Berkeley Haas School of Business, the following functions were the most highly paid:

#1: Business development and strategy, mean base salary of $132,890

#2: Consulting, mean base salary of $129,929

#3: Finance, mean base salary of $117,952

#4: General management, mean base salary of $125,682

#5: Marketing, mean base salary of $130,825

#6: Operations, mean base salary of $121,945

#7: Real estate, mean base salary of $1213,547

#8: Rotational program, mean base salary of $129,714

By function, the highest mean sign-on bonus was in the rotational program, which averaged $57,000. The lowest average sign-on bonus was $20,500, in the business development and strategy function.

Why MBA students should select a specialty
Entering into a well-paying industry or function is only one component that influences the salary metrics cited above. Students also have the opportunity to specialize in an industry or function, rather than becoming a generalist, which can increase mean payouts. For example, at Berkeley, you can select an area of emphasis in social sector leadership, entrepreneurship, or corporate social responsibility. By focusing on these niche areas of business, you’re learning adaptable, future-facing skills that will help you achieve specific career goals. A specialized MBA will not only give you a competitive edge—boosting your odds of landing an interview or receiving a job offer—it can also increase your wages.

Research shows that MBA concentrations focused on verbal concepts and critical thinking over technical or quantitative skills may have higher wage increases year-over-year. For example, the mean starting salary for an MBA student who specializes in international business is $62,600 and increases to $121,000 as a mid-career average. Likewise, the innovation management average starting salary is $62,600 and rises to $134,000 at mid-career.

Furthermore, according to Berkeley Haas School of Business graduate, Jack Song, "With the specialization, you gain a close network that helps in learning the latest trends. It also helped me obtain my career goals with my first job out of MBA school."

Are you ready to determine which MBA career path is right for you? We can help. Contact Berkeley Haas School of Business today.

 

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The Evolution of the MBA: Professional Advancement in the Information   [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2019, 07:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: The Evolution of the MBA: Professional Advancement in the Information Age
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When we discuss the MBA, the first things that come to mind are its practical applications and benefits in today’s modern, technology-filled global business world. But did you know the Master of Business Administration, or MBA, has been around for well over 100 years? Let’s take a look at how it all began and where it can take you.

The history of the MBA
In the early 1900s, companies were looking for a scientific approach to management. To meet this need the Harvard Business School established the first MBA program in 1098. Eighty students enrolled in the first year, taught by 15 faculty members.

According to the Economist, the MBA then “developed from the accounting and book-keepingcourses introduced as the country lost its frontier image and began to industrialize.”

At the time, the concept of a formalized business program wasn’t looked upon as being on the same level as earning an advanced degree in disciplines like law and medicine. But over the years, the appeal of learning about the science of management spread and the number of MBA students at Harvard steadily increased:

  • 1908: 80 students
  • 1920: 300
  • 1930: 1,070
As the Machine Age, the Age of Oil, and the Jet Age became significant time periods in modern history, these transformational industries required managers who knew how to run a thriving, fast-paced business.

The MBA begins to evolve
But Harvard wasn’t the only school that would begin to cater to new economic demands. In the decades to come, the popularity of the formalized MBA continued to expand, as many schools soon began offering MBA degrees. The original approach to the MBA program, based on Frederick Winslow Taylor’s Principles of Scientific Management, became a springboard that other universities used to launch a variety of modern-day, specialized MBA programs focusing on specific business areas.

In 1955, the UC Berkeley MBA is born
In 1898, just a few years before the first MBA was awarded on the East Coast, the Haas School of Business was established as the College of Commerce of the University of California. In 1955, the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Administration officially opened and joined the cohort of America universities that awarded MBAs to students who completed a specific study path.

One year later, in 1956, UC Berkeley launched executive MBA education programs to help developing leaders reach their full potential and produce tangible results when leading companies in every industry.

Fast forward to the present. On a global scale, the human race is experiencing the Information Age -- also called the Computer Age, Digital Age, or New Media Age -- and it’s changing every aspect of life, from business to healthcare, to the way we socialize with our family, friends, and colleagues. We’re part of an economy based on information technology that’s powered by a global workforce. To continue to thrive and innovate, small and large companies need strong, well-trained, entrepreneurial leaders and visionaries at the helm to not only survive the pace of innovation but truly thrive and scale.

What UC Berkeley offers students in 2019 and beyond
If innovation excites you, you’ll have access to all kinds of fundamental and specialized courses -- particularly in the information technology space -- that prepare you for both traditional and non-traditional jobs after graduating. Courses are designed to help you develop as a leader who is capable of turning innovation into impact.

Learn about Data and Decisions, Operations, Macroeconomics in the Global Economy, the Fundamentals of Design Thinking, and a plethora of hands-on courses. Experience and benefit from modern programs like the Institute for Business Innovation, which “disseminates pioneering research on innovation, trains students to be inventive and entrepreneurial leaders, and facilitates innovation in both the startup and corporate domains.”

The Berkeley Haas School of Business offers MBA courses in the following areas:

Furthermore, the UC Berkeley MBA program offers an average of 65 electives each semester (50% of which incorporate hands-on projects), and 12 required courses. Learn more about our rigorous and interdisciplinary MBA curriculum.

A UC Berkeley MBA can advance your career in almost any industry
The courses you take and hands-on experience you gain through enrolling in the UC Berkeley MBA program equip you with a very valuable and marketable set of skills you can use across a variety of industries.

For example, nearly one-third of the 2108 graduates went to work in the tech sector, one-quarter were hired by consulting firms. Their classmates pursued positions in finance (14%), CPG/retail (8%), and the nonprofit and healthcare sectors (both 4%).

The top employers of Haas graduates range from the Boston Consulting Group and McKinsey to Google and Amazon, Deloitte and Tesla. And, 14% go to work in start-ups.

Why it’s important to get an MBA now
Knowing the history of the MBA helps potential MBA candidates understand the exciting evolution this graduate degree has undergone. As the pace of human and technological development continues to accelerate during the Information Age, the UC Berkeley MBA specifically -- nestled next door to buzzing Silicon Valley -- keeps evolving. We rise to meet the challenge of training the world’s best leaders. Through specialized training focused on innovation, entrepreneurship, and experiential learning, the Berkeley MBA is empowering professionals to run and support thriving businesses that have a global impact.

Want to be prepared to create your own opportunities in the Digital Age? Explore how top-ranked UC Berkeley MBA programs can give you the tools to make it happen.

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3 Ways an MBA Will Advance Your Intrapreneur Career - and 3 Ways it Wo  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2019, 06:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 3 Ways an MBA Will Advance Your Intrapreneur Career - and 3 Ways it Won't
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Before embarking on any new adventure in your academic and professional life, it’s important to begin with clear expectations of what may or may not happen. Though there’s no roadmap etched in stone when you follow any path, knowing the potential ROI of each option allows you to properly assess and decide whether that path aligns with where you ultimately want to go.

If you’re an aspiring intrapreneur--someone in a management role who promotes innovative product development and marketing--you shoot for the moon daily. You’re always looking for ways to become a more confident leader. You seek opportunities to get coaching and feedback to become better at crafting and executing the perfect pitch.

But to become the best business leader and innovator you dream of being within your company, would enrolling in a part-time MBA, a full-time MBA, or an executive MBA program be worth the investment? As you consider enrolling in a top business school, be sure you’re clear on what to expect and what not to expect out of the program. Below, we’ll take a closer look at three ways an MBA will advance your intrapreneurial career and three ways it won’t.

3 ways an MBA WILL advance your intrapreneur career
1. An MBA program WILL introduce you to great ideas and people.
When you enroll in the best MBA program for you, you’ll be exposed to great ideas and inspiring, dynamic people who can positively influence your professional life. Being around like-minded intrapreneurs in an environment designed for growth and expansion will inspire you to find ideas and abilities within yourself. You’ll get the chance to learn from real-life business leaders, collaborate with other inspiring students and working professionals from all over the world, and bounce ideas off other passionate thinkers who also want to develop successful products and effectively bring them to market.

2. An MBA program WILL help you hone your novel perspective.
When you take design thinking courses and participate in collaborative business projects, top MBA programs will teach you how to turn your unique intrapreneurial perspective into actionable business models. The Berkeley Haas MBA program, for example, will teach you how to come up with strategic product launch plans that translate into measurable results. Through your coursework, group projects, and daily conversations with classmates and faculty, you’ll develop a deeper understanding of the global economy beyond your immediate work experience and knowledge. This new knowledge will broaden your business perspective to ensure the ideas you pitch within your company have steady legs to stand on.

3. An MBA program WILL provide metrics for risk-taking.
Intrapreneurs take risks. After all, risk-taking is a crucial part of being a successful business person within any profitable company, large or small. But, these risks need to be calculated and based on reliable projections. The best business schools will teach you exactly how to create sustainable, data-based business models, equipping you with the tools to take more informed risks on your intrapreneurial path.

3 ways an MBA will NOT propel your intrapreneur career
1. An MBA will NOT hand you a million-dollar idea.
When you walk through the doors of the best business schools, you walk into an environment filled with spirit. Business school is a place to put new ideas to work--a place where you learn how to move teams and organizations from vision to reality. But when it comes to ideation, that’s not something even the top MBA programs can do for you. That has to come from learning more about your industry and market needs. Earning your MBA will expose you to experiential learning and leadership development, including chances to pitch business ideas in front of other intrapreneurs, opportunities to join student clubs where you can fine-tune ideas, and more. You’ll be empowered with tools for honing your own idea--thus increasing the probability of a successful business or product launch--but the idea must come from you.

2. An MBA will NOT give you ambition.
If you’re looking to jumpstart your ambition, earning an MBA is not going to do that for you. This specialized academic experience will teach you the fundamentals of general management while sharpening your leadership skills. More specifically, you will learn how to act on evidence and analysis. As a result, you’ll feel more assertive and more confident. But you need to draw on intrinsic desire and passion to stay motivated and to carry you through the adversity that every intrapreneur inevitably faces. To succeed, that motivation has to come from you.

3. An MBA will NOT guarantee a salary boost.
Finally, earning an MBA will not guarantee that you make boatloads more money. Though earning this advanced degree will boost your strategic knowledge as an intrapreneur--equipping you with the skills to land sandbox funding, innovate, and advance ideas within your existing organization--it’s tough to equate an MBA with a specific dollar amount. But one thing is for sure: earning your MBA from a top business school will give you the tools and methods to manage and raise money for projects while nurturing brilliant ideas. By participating in programs like Launch at Berkeley Haas, for example, venture capitalists, angel investors, industry veterans, mentors, the other members of your cohort, and successful alumni will help you build a fundable company.

If you do decide to enroll in business school, it’s important to have the right expectations about what you will experience as a result of your studies. Earning your MBA won’t bring you overnight business success. But it will equip you with the tools you need to give it everything you’ve got.

Looking for a business school program that specifically supports intrapreneurs? Explore how a Berkeley MBA can empower you to become a successful innovator within your company.

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3 ways an MBA will advance your intrapreneur career - and 3 ways it wo  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2019, 16:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 3 ways an MBA will advance your intrapreneur career - and 3 ways it won't
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Before embarking on any new adventure in your academic and professional life, it’s important to begin with clear expectations of what may or may not happen. Though there’s no roadmap etched in stone when you follow any path, knowing the potential ROI of each option allows you to properly assess and decide whether that path aligns with where you ultimately want to go.

If you’re an aspiring intrapreneur--someone in a management role who promotes innovative product development and marketing--you shoot for the moon daily. You’re always looking for ways to become a more confident leader. You seek opportunities to get coaching and feedback to become better at crafting and executing the perfect pitch.

But to become the best business leader and innovator you dream of being within your company, would enrolling in a part-time MBA, a full-time MBA, or an executive MBA program be worth the investment? As you consider enrolling in a top business school, be sure you’re clear on what to expect and what not to expect out of the program. Below, we’ll take a closer look at three ways an MBA will advance your intrapreneurial career and three ways it won’t.

3 ways an MBA WILL advance your intrapreneur career
1. An MBA program WILL introduce you to great ideas and people.
When you enroll in the best MBA program for you, you’ll be exposed to great ideas and inspiring, dynamic people who can positively influence your professional life. Being around like-minded intrapreneurs in an environment designed for growth and expansion will inspire you to find ideas and abilities within yourself. You’ll get the chance to learn from real-life business leaders, collaborate with other inspiring students and working professionals from all over the world, and bounce ideas off other passionate thinkers who also want to develop successful products and effectively bring them to market.

2. An MBA program WILL help you hone your novel perspective.
When you take design thinking courses and participate in collaborative business projects, top MBA programs will teach you how to turn your unique intrapreneurial perspective into actionable business models. The Berkeley Haas MBA program, for example, will teach you how to come up with strategic product launch plans that translate into measurable results. Through your coursework, group projects, and daily conversations with classmates and faculty, you’ll develop a deeper understanding of the global economy beyond your immediate work experience and knowledge. This new knowledge will broaden your business perspective to ensure the ideas you pitch within your company have steady legs to stand on.

3. An MBA program WILL provide metrics for risk-taking.
Intrapreneurs take risks. After all, risk-taking is a crucial part of being a successful business person within any profitable company, large or small. But, these risks need to be calculated and based on reliable projections. The best business schools will teach you exactly how to create sustainable, data-based business models, equipping you with the tools to take more informed risks on your intrapreneurial path.

3 ways an MBA will NOT propel your intrapreneur career
1. An MBA will NOT hand you a million-dollar idea.
When you walk through the doors of the best business schools, you walk into an environment filled with spirit. Business school is a place to put new ideas to work--a place where you learn how to move teams and organizations from vision to reality. But when it comes to ideation, that’s not something even the top MBA programs can do for you. That has to come from learning more about your industry and market needs. Earning your MBA will expose you to experiential learning and leadership development, including chances to pitch business ideas in front of other intrapreneurs, opportunities to join student clubs where you can fine-tune ideas, and more. You’ll be empowered with tools for honing your own idea--thus increasing the probability of a successful business or product launch--but the idea must come from you.

2. An MBA will NOT give you ambition.
If you’re looking to jumpstart your ambition, earning an MBA is not going to do that for you. This specialized academic experience will teach you the fundamentals of general management while sharpening your leadership skills. More specifically, you will learn how to act on evidence and analysis. As a result, you’ll feel more assertive and more confident. But you need to draw on intrinsic desire and passion to stay motivated and to carry you through the adversity that every intrapreneur inevitably faces. To succeed, that motivation has to come from you.

3. An MBA will NOT guarantee a salary boost.
Finally, earning an MBA will not guarantee that you make boatloads more money. Though earning this advanced degree will boost your strategic knowledge as an intrapreneur--equipping you with the skills to land sandbox funding, innovate, and advance ideas within your existing organization--it’s tough to equate an MBA with a specific dollar amount. But one thing is for sure: earning your MBA from a top business school will give you the tools and methods to manage and raise money for projects while nurturing brilliant ideas. By participating in programs like Launch at Berkeley Haas, for example, venture capitalists, angel investors, industry veterans, mentors, the other members of your cohort, and successful alumni will help you build a fundable company.

If you do decide to enroll in business school, it’s important to have the right expectations about what you will experience as a result of your studies. Earning your MBA won’t bring you overnight business success. But it will equip you with the tools you need to give it everything you’ve got.

Looking for a business school program that specifically supports intrapreneurs? Explore how a Berkeley MBA can empower you to become a successful innovator within your company.

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Trends & Outlooks: Corporate Responsibility in Times of Crisis  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2019, 19:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Trends & Outlooks: Corporate Responsibility in Times of Crisis
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When it comes to a corporation’s success, revenue is not the onlyconsideration. A recent study by Cone Communications found that Americans want more transparency from the businesses they work with. Consumers want to know not only what a company stands for, but also what they stand up for.

Specifically, the study found that:

  • 60% of Americans hope businesses will drive social and environmental change in the absence of government regulation
  • 78% of Americans want companies to address important social justice issues
  • 76% of Americans will refuse to purchase a company’s products or services upon learning it supported an issue contrary to their beliefs
What happens when an event occurs that damages public opinion of a corporation?

When a business finds itself magnified in the public eye, they must respond carefully and quickly. For any aspiring entrepreneur, intrapreneur, or C-suite executive, it’s critical to learn what it takes to respond responsibly in times of crisis with grace and tact.

This article delves into strategies for corporate responsibility in times of crisis, and how a top MBA program can help fine-tune your abilities to handle the crisis as it strikes.

The complexity of handling a corporate crisis
Mass shootings—and the call for increased gun control—is a hot button topic in today’s social politics. The issue also provides a prime example of Americans looking for corporations to make social changes without government regulations.

In the wake of recent mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, which happened in a Walmart, members of the public are increasingly calling upon the megastore to stop selling firearms.

According to CNN, Walmart is one of the largest sellers of guns and ammunition in the United States. In response to public demands, the company—which has added restrictions to gun sales in the past—initially announced it had no plan to change the current company policy regarding selling weapons at their stores. Instead, the retailer ordered employees to remove video game signs that depicted violence, as well as displays for movies and hunting videos that reference gun violence. This move did not sit well with the public, and shoppers and the American Federation of Teachers threatened to stop shopping at Wal-Mart in response. In the days following the announcement, #BoycottWalmart began trending on Twitter. Within days, the company announced it would stop selling ammunition that can be used in assault rifles, would discourage shoppers from openly carrying guns in its stores, and would support Congressional action on gun control.

Dick's Sporting Goods found itself in a similar situation last year following the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Upon the incident, which killed 17 people, customers called for a ban on guns. As a result, Dick’s ended the sales of semi-automatic, assault-style rifles, and high-capacity magazines in their stores. The sporting goods store also raised the age for purchasing weapons from 18 to 21.

Even though the retailer took a hit to their revenue by removing the items from their inventory list, their public perception improved. This move, in the long-term, could result in a wider pool of foot soldiers for the company: loyal customers and brand ambassadors spreading positive word-of-mouth about the retailer.

These cases show the complexity of corporate responsibility in times of crisis. The success of a company encompasses how they respond to a social issue, how the public perceives the response, how quickly action happens, and a blend of short- and long-term goals.

Learning the skills you need for handling crisis
Responses to a corporate crisis must account for many layers of the business. How will your response impact your reputation? How will the response affect your bottom line (immediately and in the long term). What social or environmental cause will your response promote?

It’s not an easy scenario, especially in a divided nation. However, many of the skills you can obtain through an MBA program at UC Berkeley can help you navigate the muddy waters of crisis.

Leadership for cohesiveness
Perhaps the most important component of crisis response is a unified front. Everyone on your team must band together to stand behind whatever decision you make. Cracks in the team can show weakness and disorganization and can make the crisis worse.

An MBA program is a great place to hone soft skills like communication, teamwork, and empowerment. These skills are all necessary to rally the troops in times of business crisis. By advancing your understanding of effective communication, and learning new ways to encourage and inspire your team, you can have a stronger line of defense as you tackle the issue at hand.

Design thinking for innovation
Responding to a crisis is a game of chess, not checkers. There is a grey area when it comes to responding to public pressure appropriately, without being too reactive. It’s also critical to avoid short-sightedness during a response.

For these reasons, learning new approaches to solving complex problems is critical before you are faced with a crisis. While getting your MBA at UC Berkeley, you can unlock new ways of tackling a problem through design thinkingeducation. The concept of design thinking is rooted in the principle that humans should come before business for better fiscal results, which aligns well with a long-term crisis strategy.

Emphasize corporate responsibility
Top business schools offer specialized training in corporate responsibility, which covers curriculum like:

  • Managing Human Rights in Business
  • Business Models and Strategies for a Better World
  • Creating Shared Value
  • Designing Financial Models that Work
  • Negotiations and Conflict Resolution
In conjunction with relevant curriculum, during your studies at UC Berkeley, you can also take advantage of independent studies, consulting projects, and events that focus on corporate responsibility and sustainability to deepen your understanding of the tactics even further.

Learn from the best
Of course, nothing beats experience. During an MBA program at UC Berkeley, students have the opportunity to work with professors who have been battle-tested in corporate responsibility techniques.

  • Robert Strand is the executive director of the Center for Responsible Business and lecturer at the Berkeley Haas School of Business, who specializes in contrasting varieties of capitalism in the U.S. and Nordic contexts.
  • Sara L. Beckman, an Earl F. Cheit Faculty Fellow, is also an expert in integrating design, critical and systems thinking skills for framing and solving problems in multi-disciplinary teams.
  • Faris Natour specializes in human rights and business. Before teaching at UC Berkeley, Natour led the human rights practice at Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) and human rights research and advocacy at Calvert Investments.
Are you ready to start working on the skills you’ll need to advance into entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship, or a C-suite position? Learn to become a business executive who can handle it all from the top professors in the country. Apply Now.

 

 

 

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How to Apply to Berkeley's MBA Program in 5 Easy Steps  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2019, 19:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: How to Apply to Berkeley's MBA Program in 5 Easy Steps
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If you’ve already made the decision to get an MBA – congratulations. Often, making the decision to go for it is the hardest part. Getting your MBA is a big commitment of time and resources, and an even bigger move toward your future. While getting your master’s, you’ll develop the leadership skills and business savvy to help you achieve your personal and professional goals.

The next step is choosing the right program for your MBA.

Choosing the Right School for Your MBA
Of course, we all want to attend the best business schools, but “best” may not look the same for everyone. There are many factors to consider when comparing MBA programs, such as:

  • Location
  • Faculty
  • Alumni network
  • Cost
  • Post-graduation job placement statistics
Your perfect mix will depend on why you want an MBA, your career goals, and the type of academic approach you’re looking for, among other things.

Why Berkeley Haas is a great place to get your MBA
If you’d like to attend one of the country’s best business schools, take a moment to consider what the Berkeley Haas School of Business has to offer.

Innovation lives here
For starters, let’s talk about location - who can refuse 76-degrees-and-sunny California? But besides the awesome weather, the Bay Area is highly sought after for its quality of life and vibrant business culture. Known for decades as a hub for business and tech innovation, the Bay Area is a magnet for successful tech companies and entrepreneurs.

Various MBA programs to fit your life
Students come to Berkeley Haas at all stages in life. For this reason, we offer the flexibility of three different programs:Full-Time MBA,Evening & Weekend MBA, andMBA for Executives.Compare programs to see which one fits you best.

Top-ranked program
When it comes to your MBA program, prestige matters. Berkeley Haas is a top MBA program, which consistently ranks among the best business schools in the nation.

Work with stellar professors
At Berkeley Haas, you’ll be learning from a distinguished team of scholars, researchers, and business leaders. Professors at Haas are dedicated to questioning the status quo through groundbreaking research and interactive teaching styles.

Our faculty is internationally recognized for their research, including two Nobel Laureates for Economic Sciences since 1994, professors Oliver Williamson and John Harsanyi.

The future is bright after Berkeley
For many students, career outlook is one of the biggest factors for choosing an MBA program. Top employers consistently look to Berkeley MBA grads for their high-level mastery of practical and managerial skills, as well as their ability to think outside the box. Berkeley Haas graduates work for business powerhouses like Facebook, Adobe, Amazon, Deloitte, Google, Tesla, Ideo, Parthenon, and others.

Our Class of 2018 Employment Report shows 94.4% of graduates receive offers within three months of graduation, and earn a mean base annual salary of $127,571.

Opportunities for financial assistance
Don’t let financial limitations hold you back from pursuing your dreams. Berkeley Haas offers options for financial assistance including merit and need-based scholarships, and loans. If you’re currently employed, find out if your employer will offer to contribute or reimburse part of the cost. You can also start planning ahead for tuition, fees, and cost of living.

How to apply for your Berkeley MBA
Once you’ve decided Berkeley Haas School of Business is the place for you, it’s time to apply. We welcome candidates from a wide variety of industries and backgrounds. The application process will allow you to showcase your professional and academic achievements, qualifications, and leadership potential.

Here’s how to apply in 5 easy steps:

Step 1: Take any required tests

All candidates must take the GMAT or GRE exam before applying. GRE scores are valid for five years from the end of the year in which you took the test. If you received your undergraduate degree in a country where English is not a primary official language, you will need to submit official evidence of English Language Proficiency.

Step 2: Create an account

Your Berkeley Haas/Haas School of Business account is where all application materials will live. Our secure online application makes it easy to keep track of documents, see what you still need to submit, and save your work until all requirements are completed before you finally hit “Submit.”

Step 3: Gather your documents

You’ll need to prepare a variety of materials for your application. Required application documents include:

  • University transcripts
  • Resume
  • GMAT or GRE score report
  • Essays
  • Two professional letters of recommendation
  • English Language Proficiency Requirement (if applicable)
Upload documents to your account as you complete them for easy management.

Step 4: Prepare for your interview

If the Admissions Committee thinks you’re a good fit for Berkeley Haas, you’ll be invited for an interview, either on-campus or in select cities around the world. Learn more about interviewing at Berkeley Haas.

Step 5: Wait for an answer

Once you’ve submitted all your documents, paid the application fee, and submitted your application, it’s time for a bit of patience. We know you’re excited to develop the skills and leadership that will propel your career forward. On the notification deadline for admissions decisions, you’ll receive an email to check your online application status.

Find answers to other frequently asked questions about admissions decisions.

If you’re ready to make a career leap and be a part of the Berkeley Haas experience, start the application process today.

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Six fears students face when applying for an MBA (and how to overcome   [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2019, 13:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Six fears students face when applying for an MBA (and how to overcome them)
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Spiders. Public speaking. Heights. You probably recognize these common fears, but would you be surprised to learn that applying for an MBA also prompts fear in a lot of people? That’s because applying for an MBA can call up lots of emotions, from insecurity about being compatible with the program, to worry about the cost, to uncertainty about the return on investment.

Read on to learn more about the nagging fears that keep students from applying for an MBA and find out how to squash these relatable qualms.

1. Am I good enough for a top MBA program?
Many prospective MBA students fear that they are not good enough for the program they aspire to attend. If the accomplishment feels out of reach, candidates will not apply. They fear it is not worth the hassle — nor the application fees — only to receive a rejection.

Do not be overly critical of yourself.

First, assess your current starting point. How do your GMAT scores look? For reference, last year at Berkeley, the mid-80% range of GMAT scores for the evening and weekend program was between 640-740. For full-time MBA students, the mid-80% range was 690-750.

If your test scores don’t fall within this range, don’t fret. Tests can always be retaken.

It’s equally important to understand that acceptance into a program doesn’t only boil down to GPA and test scores. There are many other factors that can make you an ideal candidate at top business schools. For example, at Berkeley, the holistic approach to weighing applicants also considers a candidate’s:

  • Character
  • Qualifications
  • Experiences
2. Is my quantitative profile strong enough?
MBA programs at top business schools won’t waste any time tapping into your quantitative rigor. For example, the first-year curriculum at Berkeley includes coursework in:

  • Data and Decisions
  • Economics for Business Decision Making
  • Financial Accounting
  • Macroeconomics in the Global Economy
Brush-up your skills.

Doubts about whether you have a strong enough background to participate in the conversation and understand the material may be valid. However, your doubts can be allayed with a little attention to detail and preparation.

If you want to apply for a top business school, it makes sense to brush up on — or learn — relevant skills. You can do this by leveraging free online resources like:

3. Can I afford an MBA?
It’s reasonable to ask yourself how you will pay for an MBA program and whether the investment will be worth the return.

Research ways to share the cost.

Though the cost of an MBA is an essential consideration, so is the support system that may help lessen the financial hit. In some instances, employers will help cover the costs of an MBA, recognizing it is an asset for them as well. Not only does an MBA improve your managerial and critical thinking skills--immediate benefits on the job-- employers can also benefit from the expanded professional network you gain in an MBA program.

Additionally, most top business schools offer a variety of scholarships for domestic and international students. More than 50 percent of students in Berkeley’s evening-and-weekend MBA program receive some form of financial assistance. Moreover, for the 2019-2020 academic year, Berkeley Haas awarded nearly $9 million in scholarships to full-time MBA students.

The return on investment of an MBA might also alleviate your concerns. Consider the post-graduation statistics of Berkeley alumni:

4. How can I make an MBA work with my full-time workload?
When considering an MBA, many students automatically think of a full-time MBA program. The thought of attending school full time draws attention to challenges, especially how you will be able to maintain your job and still progress in your academic journey.

Top business schools offer flexibility for professionals seeking to advance their credentials by offering executive MBAs and evening-and-weekend programs:

Consider part-time MBA programs.

MBA for Executives
The executive MBA is a part-time MBA program that gives students a schedule that concentrates your classes into a shorter timeframe--the Berkeley MBA for Executives is a 19-month program--that intensifies your learning. Like you, your classmates are executives and professionals intent on honing their leadership and management skills. You gain not only knowledge, but a valuable network as well. According to The Economist, Berkeley's MBA for Executives ranks #4, globally.

Evening and weekend MBA
Evening and weekend schedules provide students the chance to further their professional career, on their terms. At Berkeley, you have the choice of an evening or weekend class schedule. Plus, while it is typically a three-year program, students can accelerate the program by taking a heavier load of courses or by taking summer courses. Berkeley ranks as the #1 part-time business school in the nation, according to U.S. News.

5. Do my professional passions align with an MBA?
Anyone who wishes to further their leadership and management skills should be viewed as a candidate for an MBA. An MBA program will teach a broad range ofsoft and hard skills that will help you earn a job you’re passionate about upon graduating.

Look for a program that supports your goals.

Berkeley Haas ranks ninth worldwide in the effectiveness of career services. Between face time with business leaders in Silicon Valley through programs like Haas@Work, the school's strong alumni network, and its connections in the area, students have success finding jobs almost immediately after graduating.

The best way to get a feel for the opportunities at Berkeley is to visit the campus, sit in on a class, talk to other students, and attend an information session. View Berkeley’s events calendar for upcoming events and your chance to observe the campus culture.

6. How do I apply?
After researching the program of your choice, and brushing up on the skills or test scores that can improve your odds of acceptance, you may decide to begin the application process.

Knowing where to start can be overwhelming and confusing. At Berkeley, the application process begins online. You will be required to:

  • Submit transcripts
  • Take a GMAT or GRE
  • Submit an essay
  • Provide two letters of recommendation
Next steps may include an interview and an English proficiency exam. Berkeley keeps the application process straightforward and transparent to minimize the anxiety often associated with applying for an MBA program.

Are you ready to move forward in your professional life? Apply for your MBA at Berkeley today.

 

 

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How a “deep geek” rose to leadership during the tech revolution  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2019, 13:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: How a “deep geek” rose to leadership during the tech revolution
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From an internship at NASA to running engineering at Reddit to developing business intelligence (BI) software first at Microsoft and now as chief product officer at Looker, Nick Caldwell, MBA 15, has been a leader in the tech revolution.

How did it all begin?
It started with my dad who was a bit of a geek himself. He got me hooked on computers when he brought home a Tandy 1000 from work one day. I’ve got a picture of me sitting on his lap at age 4, wearing a Thundercats T-shirt, typing something into the MS-DOS command line. Later on, at about the age of 10, he got me a book called Learn to Program C++ in Ten Easy Lessons. I started coding games and writing software shortly after that.

How influential was that NASA internship?
It was life changing and it opened the door for a ton of opportunities. I learned how to code professionally—real code that was going to get launched into space. And I gained a network of people who were influential in my getting into MIT. On the flip side, after dealing with the bureaucracy, I decided that I didn’t ever want to work for the government again—at least not as a software engineer.

You were at Microsoft for 15 years. What was the transition like, moving from an individual contributor to a manager at Microsoft?
I became a manager pretty early, after about three or four years. Part of that came from the fact that I don’t like being told what to do. I also realized early on that I got satisfaction in mentoring people and helping them achieve their goals. Caring more about people than tech is the best indicator that you should think about a management career.

What made you finally decide you needed an MBA?
I’ve always had an entrepreneurial streak even though I spent most of my career at a giant company. At Microsoft I worked on new technologies like machine learning and natural language processing long before they were commonplace. I also founded many product efforts, including Power BI [Business Intelligence].

At some point I knew I needed to get closer to where the real action was happening. Being in one place for 15 years meant I felt sort of stuck. I needed a forcing function to get me going to the next place I wanted to be. I saw the MBA as a way to force myself out of a very comfortable position and give myself the confidence to grow.

What convinced you Berkeley was the place for you?
I looked at a lot of places and Berkeley was the right fit. I wanted to learn specifically about entrepreneurship and technology and at Berkeley you’re going to be surrounded by people in that scene. As a practical matter, I needed to be able to do this while maintaining a full-time job at Microsoft. And Berkeley has a great evening and weekend program.

What was your favorite course?
I have to list two. The first is Improvisational Leadership -- a class that teaches a mixture of improvisation techniques with leadership training. For example, the instructor might give you a pretend scenario and you act it out or work with a partner to quickly improvise. It sounds hokey but the tools helped me overcome my natural introversion, gave me more confidence, and helped me be more authentic. I took these skills back to work and immediately put them to use.

The other was Fundamentals of Design Thinking. It was basically a hands-on lab that offered a systematic framework for how to empathize with customers to understand their core needs, experiment with solutions, and test feedback. It’s simply the best class I’ve ever taken on product design, and honestly the only one I’ve taken that’s worth remembering.

What influence do you think Berkeley has had on your career?
My MBA got me out of my comfort zone and on the entrepreneurial track I always wanted to be on. It also up-leveled my management skills to a higher plane. Berkeley also gave me the confidence that I could learn quickly and take on any new managerial role.

I hear a lot about “new thinking” when it comes to the Berkeley MBA program. What does that mean to you?
Two things. First, there’s been a shift that Berkeley has been at the forefront of: the integration of data science with business and management. Nowadays data play an important role in any critical business role. Many of my Berkeley courses were oriented toward preparing for this shift.

Second is the emphasis on networks. Modern businesses don’t function in isolation. We had multiple classes on network effects, not just with people but open innovation, how businesses are a network of ideas and how you need to tap into and then contribute to those networks.

What’s your leadership style and how has it evolved?
I think when I first started my management career, I thought it was my goal to hire people who thought and acted like me. Nowadays I see things much differently. A great leader tries to bring the best possible team to the field. So I’m much more focused on building organizations by finding great people and inspiring them.

A big part of that is looking for people who are fearless, don’t put boundaries on themselves, and can act independently. That freedom has to be balanced with accountability and the belief that the team comes first.

If I can find those people and give them an inspiring vision and clear execution path, great things will happen.

What more do you think you need to learn?
A wise woman once said, ‘The man who knows something knows that he knows nothing at all.’ Whether you call it growth mindset, or Student Always, or whatever -- it’s my belief that we can never stop learning.

Leadership is an unlimited space to explore and something I love studying. I’m excited to be learning more about conscious leadership and self-care, tools that are essential to leading the latest generation of workers.

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Eight things to look for when searching for an MBA program  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Sep 2019, 07:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Eight things to look for when searching for an MBA program
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Everyone has a different motivation for getting an MBA. Perhaps you want to take on a more challenging role or increase your current salary. Maybe you want to start a business or refine your communication, public speaking, and negotiation skills. Whatever your reasons for getting an MBA, there are many factors that will help you choose the best business school.

Here are some of the main factors prospective students should consider:

1. Flexibility in programs
Many MBA candidates are already established professionals, and many have families. Berkeley Haas has three flexible MBA programs to give more people the opportunity to experience a world-class education and training:

  • Full-time MBA – A 21-month program designed for students to benefit from in-depth exposure to the latest business trends and ideas.
  • Evening & Weekend MBA – A three-year part-time program tailored to the needs of working professionals.
  • MBA for Executives (EMBA) – A 19-month program designed for working professionals at the executive level.
No matter which Berkeley Haas program you choose, you’ll be earning your degree from one of the nation’s top MBA programs.

2. Costs
Costs are a major factor in choosing an MBA program. Getting your master’s is a big investment, but with the right program, the time and money you spend will pay off tenfold.

Berkeley Haas MBA programs by the numbers:

  • Berkeley Haas full-time MBA – Estimated tuition and fees for the 2019-2020 program are $62,446 for California residents, and $64,652 for non-residents, plus the cost of living, books and supplies, and other personal expenses.
  • Evening & Weekend MBA – Program fees for the 2019--2020 academic year are $3,464 per unit, with a minimum of 42 units required for graduation.
  • Executive MBA –The cost for the class entering in May 2020 is $194,000 for the 19-month program. Cost includes tuition, books, hotel accommodations, administrative fees, and most meals during residence periods. Airfare not included.
This initial investment in developing your skills can pay off in the long run when you start a successful company or negotiate a higher salary for your next job.

3. Job placement stats
Pursuing an MBA to advance your career and enhance job prospects? You’re not alone. Choosing the best MBA program can help gain the attention of renowned financial institutions, consulting firms, and technology companies in need of top talent.

TheBerkeley Haas Class of 2018 reported:

  • 94.4% of graduates received offers within three months of graduation
  • Mean base annual salary of $127,571
  • 70% received a sign-on bonus
  • 41% received stock options
4. Scholarships and financial aid
When it comes to financing your MBA, it’s nice to know you’re not in this alone. Berkeley Haas offersseveral forms of financial assistance for all MBA programs, including:

  • Merit and need-based scholarships
  • Federal and private loans
  • Grants
  • Instructorships
Berkeley Haas graduates working in the nonprofit or public service sectors can also take advantage of the Loan Repayment Assistance Program (LRAP)

Other funding options include veterans’ benefits, a 529 savings plan, or a home equity line of credit. Speak with our financial aid office to discuss your options for financing your future.

5. Professors
No matter where you get your MBA, the professors will have a huge impact on shaping your experience. Top MBA programs have a distinguished faculty who can provide both a strong academic foundation and practical, real-world experiences, regardless of your field of study.

Professors at Berkeley Haas are thought leaders, business leaders, and internationally recognized researchers. They are Nobel Prize Laureates and industry experts, many of whom have received awards for their excellence in teaching.Get to know our professors.

6. Alumni network
At the best business schools, your MBA doesn’t stop working for you once you graduate. A strong alumni network offers benefits that stay with you for years to come.

Berkeley Haas has an extremely active worldwide network of more than 41,000 alumni and over 30 active alumni chapters. The robust alumni program makes it easy to stay connected through events, our LinkedIn alumni directory, affinity groups, and other career resources.Berkeley Haas grads are doing great things, and you never what exciting opportunities could come from connecting with your peers.

7. Location
What they say in real estate applies to your MBA, too – it’s all about location, location, location. Berkeley is blessed with a thriving music and art scene, not to mention fantastic weather practically year-round, and easy access to the mountains, ocean, and wine country. More importantly for those in search of the best business schools, it’s a hub for cutting-edge industries and business leaders.

Our campus of three connected buildings is designed to feel both intimate and ultramodern. You’ll have everything within reach, including a state-of-the-art computer lab, a comprehensive career center, a café, a flexible innovation lab, and a large business and economics library.

8. The campus culture
Top business schools are distinguished by culture, and in the right MBA program, you can learn as much from your fellow students as from professors. Berkeley Haas is built upon a culture of leadership and innovation, with programs that aim to provide a challenging and rewarding student experience.

Some perspectives that are core to the Berkeley Haas experience and culture include:

  • Diversity and inclusion – The Haas school recruits the most diverse students from every race, ethnicity, gender, age, religion, language, abilities/disabilities, sexual orientation, gender identity, socioeconomic status, and geographic region.
  • Hands-on learning – Our commitment to learning by doing takes place through extracurricular clubs and organizations, internships, and in the classroom.
  • Global focus – Students are encouraged to adopt a global business perspective through international opportunities like a semester abroad, study trips to other countries, or serving as a consultant overseas.
Whether you’re looking to advance your career or start a new one, the Berkeley Haas MBA program will provide you with the skills you need to get you there.Apply now

 

 

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How MBA skills can promote inclusion and diversity in the corporate ca  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2019, 08:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: How MBA skills can promote inclusion and diversity in the corporate cannabis world
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The 21st-century gold rush is in full force, and everyone from your neighbor to CEOs of major companies like Anheuser Busch is panning for a chunk of the revenue.

What’s the product? Here are some hints:

  • It’s been cultivated for thousands of years
  • It’s a plant made up of thousands of chemicals
  • Two of those chemicals are heavily commercialized
If you guessed cannabis, you’re correct.

This post dives into the billion-dollar plant, its newly shaped commercialization model, and opportunities in the current marketplace. MBA students at top business schools can seize these opportunities, with the right training.

Cannabis goes corporate and swallows the competition
The United States was late to the game when it comes to legalizing, decriminalizing, and relaxing legislation for cannabis. As a result, U.S.-based companies are scrambling to get a piece of the revenue pie in this booming industry, now primarily dominated by Canadian companies.

Interesting partnerships have formed over the last two years as U.S. giants scramble for their stake in the market share:

  • The largest cannabis distributor is Canadian-based Canopy Growth. In 2018, New York-based beer supplier, Constellation, invested $4 billion in Canopy to help scale the production of recreational marijuana in more than 30 countries.
  • The second-largest distributor—and first cannabis company to IPO on Nasdaq—is Canada-based Tilray. In 2018, Anheuser-Busch entered into a $100 million joint venture to develop non-alcoholic cannabidiol (CBD) drinks.
  • The third-largest distributor, Canada-based Aurora Cannabis, has not yet penned a deal with a corporation, because apparently, U.S.-based consultant Nelson Peltz warned the company against it.
With the cannabis industry growing larger and more competitive than eve, what does it take to find success in the gold rush?

Skills that can advance the modern cannabis industry

Because the legal cannabis industry is relatively new in the global and national economy, students entering top MBA programs are in a unique position. MBA students can specialize their studiestoward the growing market demands and new opportunities of the booming industry.

Let’s look at the skills needed to solve business problems that have emerged in the cannabis industry over the last few years.

Business ethics
Ever since marijuana was declared a Schedule I drug in 1970, black and brown communities have been unequally affected by the enforcement of the drug laws. As the U.S. takes a more progressive look at cannabis regulation, a common argument is that legal cannabis is helping fix social ills, and under-represented communities will now have a fair shake in the now-legal trade.

However, looking at the number of mergers and acquisitions and partnerships, we see that white males heading giant corporations are taking majority control of this industry. This means minority communities are still missing out on the revenue.

The underrepresentation of people of color in the cannabis community is a real problem that needs to be solved. By taking advanced classes in business ethics at UC Berkeley — a school that places a keen focus on diversity and inclusion in the marketplace — you can acquire the tools to critically assess modern problems in the industry, and develop unique solutions.

For example, questions like the following are part of valid, critical conversations to have with classmates and professors during your MBA studies:

  • How can we make weed fairer by focusing on inclusivity?
  • Should the government run monopolies on cannabis, as some states do with alcohol?
  • How can ‘ma and pa’ shops keep up if corporations drive the price of the product down?
There are additional aspects of the cannabis industry that might require a closer eye on business ethics. For example:

  • Does wider-scale planting and watering of cannabis require increased regulation to minimize the environmental impact?
  • Does the marketing of cannabis impact children? Meaning, are packages of edibles easily confused for mints or candy by unknowing children?
By emphasizing business ethics in your MBA studies, you can help navigate, problem solve and communicate unique ways to handle the grey areas of the cannabis industry while regulation is still very much in its infancy.

Social impact
Because of the partnerships outlined above, cannabis companies are shifting their business models to match those of the alcohol industry.

According to Ben Cort, a well-known advocate for Marijuana Policy, cannabis is following the 80/20 rule, which means focusing on the 20 percent of customers who consume 80 percent of your product. It’s a rule that Cort says many powerhouses in the alcohol industry follow.

Cort also believes, as in the alcohol industry, the 20 percent of high-use consumers are low-income, minorities. Part of the reason for high usage in this demographic is its proximity to dispensaries and grow ops. According to the Denver Post, many grow ops and dispensaries have opened their doors in communities of color and lower incomes because they are near industrial sites — prime real estate for pot growers.

These findings show that under-served communities aren’t only missing out on the revenue, they may be negatively affected.

By emphasizing social impact in your MBA studies, you can start to define ways to help under-represented communities fight the complexities of a booming, legal pot industry like:

  • Home values declining due to proximity of pot grow ops
  • Rising crime
  • Youth marijuana usage
Design thinking
As we mentioned earlier, the lack of diversity and inclusion in the cannabis industry is an existing problem. Reports show that entrepreneurs of colors account for only 4.3 percent of the industry.

Chelsea Solomita, a Southern California-based UX designer, has a problem with this statistic. Especially considering that Blacks are 3.73 times more likely than whites to get arrested for marijuana in states where marijuana isn’t legal. Moreover, even in states where cannabis is legal, black people are still arrested for marijuana charges at a rate nearly 16 times higher than white people.

Solomita thinks that by applying design thinking to the industry's lack of diversity, we can solve several problems. Solomita began learning ways people of color can use technology and other tools to participate in the cannabis industry. The result is a business based on design-thinking called Grow, which focuses on:

  • How, post-incarceration, marijuana offenders can re-enter society as successful entrepreneurs.
  • How ‘ma and pa’ cannabis growers can obtain vocational training to work in the modern business world.
Berkeley’s MBA program offers design thinking courses, a focus on diversity and inclusion, and participatory events like hackathons. These programs and events can help you, like Solomita, apply design thinking to solve socio-economic issues that arise when industries like cannabis start booming.

Making a strategic entrance into the cannabis industry
The opportunities to enter the cannabis market and challenge the status quoare endless. However, to successfully enter the market, you must first acquire the skills to do so strategically.

With an MBA from UC Berkeley, you can learn how to successfully pinpoint the market needs and gaps. The knowledge and skills you develop will help you become a strong business person in this competitive and thriving global space.

Apply now, to start your journey as an innovator in the cannabis industry.

 

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Making impact: Berkeley EMBA grad fuels cleantech and women entreprene  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2019, 08:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Making impact: Berkeley EMBA grad fuels cleantech and women entrepreneurs
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When Rose Maizner, EMBA 17, met with RenewableTech Ventures founder Todd Stevens to discuss the possibility of joining their team, she complimented him on his launch of an impact fund.

“We’re just investing our money in good things,” replied Stevens, who formed the Salt Lake City-based venture fund to invest in early-stage clean technologies, but had yet to think of himself as an impact investor. The seasoned venture professional simply chose to use his skillset to help better the world.

Rose wouldn’t have been familiar with impact investing either had she not attended a 2010 talk on the subject by then-Berkeley Professor Darian Rodriguez Heyman, who gave the keynote address for a Utah Fundraisers Society event. That talk turned the course of her career and pointed her to the Berkeley MBA for Executives (EMBA) program.

“Working in the nonprofit sector, I’d seen the challenges around funding and how the lack of sustainability could cause great programs to disappear overnight,” says Rose. “His talk revealed a way to create lasting change by generating revenue as a socially responsible venture.”

Afterward, Rose signed up for the Berkeley MBA mailing list. She also scoured Salt Lake City for potential impact investment firms and found RenewableTech.

Part of the deal
Stevens hired Rose based upon her nonprofit development background and her enthusiasm for exploring what “impact” might mean for them as a fund in the cleantech space.

As long as Rose was willing to learn the intricacies of cleantech and venture funding, the firm promised to support her. If she wanted to pursue partnership, however, getting an MBA would be “part of the deal.”

So, in 2016, Rose became a commuter student, flying from Utah to the Bay Area to attend weekend blocks and weeklong immersions.

She credits her first immersion week—Leadership Communications in Napa Valley—for shattering her biases and fear.

“My classmates came from such diverse backgrounds and, frankly, I was intimidated because they were all so brilliant,” she says. “But that week revealed how much we have in common and developed in us a sense of wanting group success.”

The WEMBAs
The women in her cohort formed the WEMBAs (Women of EMBA). Through WhatsApp, they supported each other and chatted about the issues they face as women professionals. 

It’s a practice they continue today. 

When Rose faced her first pitch last year, she messaged the WEMBAs for tips on calming her nerves. “I got this amazing bunch of messages. It was the perfect boost to have before going on stage to speak.”

Relevant courses
Along with peer support and foundational skills in finance and strategy, her Berkeley education offered courses relevant to her work and passion.

New Venture Finance, taught by Distinguished Teaching Fellow Maura O’Neill, connected corporate finance basics with entrepreneurship. “I still refer back to those course materials,” says Rose.

Independent study with advisor Kellie McElhaney, executive director of the Center for Equity, Gender, and Leadership, fueled ideas for Womenpreneurs, a company Rose co-founded in 2015 to support female founders and leaders.

Her study focused on improving female entrepreneurs’ access to capital. At the time, only about 2% of venture dollars went to women, and only about 8% of investment decision makers were female. 

Rose wondered if the solution might be to bring more female investors to the table. So she interviewed wealth advisors and women who had sufficient funds to invest to see how active the women were in deciding how their money was managed.

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Her findings helped form the “theory of change” framework Womenpreneurs now uses to create programs—not only for female founders but also women leaders and investors. The goal is to spur strong, female-led and -founded companies by building a supportive network of women peers and investors around them. 

Now a partner at Renewable Tech, Rose’s support network has expanded to include Berkeley professors, alumni, and staff. 

“It’s not like I graduated and the magic of Berkeley was over. I’m still a member of this amazing community, and I feel so fortunate to be a part of it.”

Ready to make a positive impact? See how the Berkeley MBA for Executives can supercharge your professional network, reach, and skills.

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Get your MBA and get on the fast track to becoming a world-class tech   [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2019, 08:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Get your MBA and get on the fast track to becoming a world-class tech leader
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Do you dream of becoming the next Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Susan Wojcicki, or Elon Musk? These and other influential tech leaders take a visionary approach to solving business problems, and their ideas have impacted the daily lives of people around the globe.

What does it take to become a household name when it comes to innovation in technology? There are many kinds of tech leaders and just as many ways to become one. Many tech innovators build their legacy over time by gaining hands-on knowledge, skills, and practical experience in the workplace.

Experience counts for a lot, but given the breakneck pace of the 21st century, what defines a leader in the tech sphere is always changing – and changing fast.

Accelerate your journey to tech greatness by earning your MBA
If you want to fast-track your trajectory to the top and become the best possible tech leader, consider getting your MBA. Experience in the workforce over time, combined with an MBA specially designed to teach you skills, lessons and insights gleaned from successful companies, will help you excel farther and faster.

The characteristics and skills of a great tech leader go beyond vision or technical ability. They also include soft skills like:

  • Communication and trust-building
  • Management skills
  • Real-time problem-solving
  • Understanding your organization’s business goals
  • Creating a company culture that supports innovation and experimentation
An MBA from a top-rated program like Berkeley Haaswill provide you with these skills as well as practical business acumen.

Benefits of earning two degrees simultaneously
Being able to earn two degrees at once is a unique way to speed up your training and build industry-specific skills. With a dual enrollment MBA program you can:

  • Earn two master's degrees in the time it normally takes to complete just one
  • Achieve your degrees at a lower cost than enrolling in each program separately
Meanwhile, you’ll still be gaining specialized skills to strengthen and nurture your leadership in technological innovation.

How UC Berkeley’s MBA/Masters of Engineering program will catapult you to the front lines of tech leadership
Just like the best technology leaders, engineers are problem solvers. According to NewEngineer.com, the fastest-growing fields of engineering are in the IT sphere. UC Berkeley now offers a dual enrollment MBA/Masters of Engineering (MEng) program that will help you gain the interdisciplinary skills you need to advance in a competitive marketplace.

If you have a technical undergraduate education, you can simultaneously earn an MEng degree at UC Berkeley’s College of Engineering and an MBA from the Haas School of Business. In just four semesters, these programs will prepare you for leadership in technical innovation in a variety of industries. Both programs are ranked among the highest in the world.

The new Haas MBA/MEng concurrent degree program is designed to address the high-tech industry’s need for leaders who possess both technical skills and business acumen:

  • In this program, you’ll take both business and engineering courses, as well as interdisciplinary courses designed especially for the concurrent program.
  • The program? culminates with an interdisciplinary capstone project in which student teams grapple with real-world challenges faced by companies, nonprofits, and governmental organizations and learn how to overcome an array of business and engineering issues.
Academic excellence combined with the innovation culture of the San Francisco Bay Area makes UC Berkeley the perfect placefor those who want to become leaders in technological innovation and entrepreneurship.

Life after UC Berkeley’s MBA/MEng program
Pursuing a dual degree enhances your resume and expertise with the unique blend of business and engineering skills that employers are looking for. This dual degree can help you:

  • Become a leader who can motivate teams
  • Work in product development
  • Become a software co-founder/creator
  • Build your own company
  • Lead product design and development for your own enterprise or within a company
  • Lead a large organization
  • Gain a better understanding of finance, markets, and marketing
  • Understand your job from a human perspective
Industry leaders are eager to recruit graduates who possess this unique blend of business and engineering skills. Typical roles for people with this type of training may include:

  • Chief Product Officer (CPO)
  • Chief Technology Officer (CTO)
  • Head of Engineering
  • Product Manager
  • Program Manager
  • Principal Architect
  • Marketing Analytics Manager
  • Senior Consultant
  • Manager of Strategy and Operations
If you aspire to any of these roles, this UC Berkeley dual degree program could be a great fit for you.

Be among the first to benefit from a dual MBA/Master of Engineering (MEng) program

This exciting new program will enroll its inaugural class in fall 2020. Prospective students may submit applications during Round I (due Thursday, September 26, 2019) or Round II (due Thursday, January 9, 2020) of the full-time MBA application cycle.

Being among the first graduates from an innovative and cutting-edge new program will put you ahead of the game. To take advantage of this opportunity to advance your tech skills and become one of the world’s top technology leaders - learn more hereor apply now.

 

 

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SoftBank’s Vision Fund has $100 billion to invest in tech companies  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2019, 08:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: SoftBank’s Vision Fund has $100 billion to invest in tech companies
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If the current state of startups proves anything, it’s that the possibilities are endless for entrepreneurs, no matter where you are in your career. Take for example SoftBank Group Corp, which is headquartered in Tokyo. Its SoftBank Vision Fund seems to be investing in everything in sight. Since 2008, they’ve poured hundreds of millions of dollars into tech companies like Uber, Wag, Compass, Brightstar, and Getaround to name a few with manymore to come.

This is exciting news for the type of companies that SoftBank is targeting and it’s exciting news for business leaders seeking investors with a vision of their own.

The future is bright for innovators and disruptors
SoftBank Vision Fund is arguably one of the most high-profile investment engines in business right now. Since 2016, it has become the biggest tech fund in history, with billions of dollars and 82 companies in its global portfolio.

SoftBank founder and CEO Masayoshi (Masa) Son is far from new to venture capitalism. The leader of the Japanese telecom giant has been betting on tech since the early days of the internet, which helped him become one of theworld’s wealthiest individuals.

The sheer magnitude of SoftBank’s investments has certainly grabbed worldwide attention. But it’s their method of doing business that really sets them apart. Namely, how and in whom they invest.

Typically, the SoftBank Vision Fund pours money into disruptors in the tech sphere, including high-profile ventures like Slack, DoorDash, and WeWork. Others are less well-known, but one thing is clear: These are not baby startups.

Different from other funds, SoftBank’s Vision Fund is investing in more mature companies.

Son thinks bigger and more long-term with his investments. The minimum SoftBank investment is around $100 million, in exchange for a larger stake in the company (between 20% – 40% ownership). Straying from the two to three year exit timeline of a typical funding venture, SoftBank has made it clear they are looking for companies with longevity. They want to see companies maximize returns over 10-15 years.

How to Become a CEO that Appeals to Investors Like SoftBank
While their checks have created billions in profit, it's argued that SoftBank isn't the reason for these companies’ success. Many, if not most of them were massively successful before. SoftBank is simply picking successful companies and betting on them over the long run.

CNBC says Sonmeets with every founder of every Vision Fund investment in person before a deal is signed. One of those founders, Mohit Aron, funder and CEO of Cohesity, says he thinks Son is looking for “a leader of a company with very big ambitions.”

Remember, they’re not looking for fast turnarounds (exits) in two or three years. This is a longer play and that means they will need a CEO with the skills to operate a company for longer than "luck" will last.

Five ways to get noticed by an investor
The culture of innovation and limitless possibilities that many CEOs are drawn to seems to be exactly what the SoftBank VisionFund is tapping into. Jeff Housenbold, one of the fund’s 10 managing partners says “... that’s part of the power of partnering with SoftBank, our ability to take you globally and allow you to become a bigger company overnight than you might have with other sources of capital.”

While there are certainly no guarantees to securing investment money like SoftBank’s, there are certain steps you can take now to start growing your company faster to put you in a more attractive position.

1. Communicate your company vision effectively
Do you have a clear vision for a groundbreaking new technology? Have an idea that taps a previously undiscovered market that shows real innovation? Or perhaps you’re already running a successful company and seeking investors to jumpstart your growth.

Unfortunately, you’re not alone. These days, it’s not enough to have a great idea. To be noticed, and pick up traction with consumers or investors, you need the skills to effectively and persuasively communicate your business idea.

To communicate your company vision effectively, you’ll need a solid background in all aspects of business, including:

It also helps to have real-world experience to learn from as you continue to grow your idea.

Being able to speak the language of business and having proven experience in research and developing solutions for modern business problems is one way to cut through the noise and get on the radar of investment firms like SoftBank.

2. Get your MBA
Learning the skills required to start and grow a viable organization is an important component of the curriculum at top business schools.

While an MBA is not a requirement for an executive role, the skills you gain at a top MBA program like UC Berkeley will provide you the preparation needed to lead your company to the top. The academics, top-notch professors, networking opportunities, and more, make your MBA a lifetime investment in your company’s success. It’s no surprise among the top 100 CEOs in the Fortune 500, 29 have MBAs; six of the top 10 CEOs have an MBA.

Berkeley Haas offers dual MBA, Masters of Engineering degree program that helps you stay on the bleeding edge of technology and entrepreneurship.

3. Specialize in intrapreneurship
Investing in mature companies means that Son and SoftBank see a long-term path for those organizations. The key ingredient to a company's ability to remain relevant and withstand a business world growing more competitive every day is innovation.

That’s why many large organizations place a high value on intrapreneurs, people who take on the role of an entrepreneur inside an already established company. Intrapreneurs promote innovative product development and marketing— from seed to market — to differentiate their business in the marketplace.

During your MBA program, you can add a special emphasis to the hard skills required to succeed in intrapreneurship--design thinking, and global economics--as well as learning the necessary soft skills like leadership, critical thinking, and applied innovation.

4. Build your network
For budding intrapreneurs and entrepreneurs, an MBA program at UC Berkeley is a great place to meet potential co-founders, investors, employees, and clients.

MBA students have the chance to get to know classmates, professors, alumni, and to make connections in the business world through:

For intrapreneurs, networking is particularly important. Innovating inside an organization can be rife with bureaucratic red tape. Obstacles are abundant, it can be difficult to acquire funding to launch new ideas, and disruptions as you push new ideas through are common However, with a solid network you have more options for creating partnerships and agreements to help finance individual projects and smooth the process. Maybe the project you find financing for is the one that gets noticed by the next big investor.

5. Apply your learnings and start your company
Odds are, you’ve heard of the app Shazam. Maybe you don’t know its story, though.

The co-founders, Chris Barton and Philip Inglebrecht, both UC Berkeley MBA graduates, developed the idea for Shazaam after taking a Strategic Innovation course, taught by Costa Markides, at the Haas School of Business.

Before entering Haas, Barton had already conceptualized the idea of a radio-monitoring technology, but lacked the skills to identify the need in the marketplace and the most strategic way to bring his idea to market.

After broadening his perspective thanks to Professor Markides, and strengthening his skills to communicate his company idea Barton was able to adjust the way he thought about his product, and bring it to market as Shazam. Though Shazam was not funded by SoftBank, the lesson is still relevant, as it was acquired by Apple in 2018 for a whopping $400 million.

By applying the learnings he acquired from his MBA program, Barton was able to successfully launch a business, innovate to current market needs, and receive a payout at the end for his remarkable work.

Are you ready to push your idea through to the next level? Get started at Berkeley Haas to learn the skills, make the connections, and execute on ideas that work.

 

 

 

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How Elisabeth Diana went from Haas alumna to Instagram’s Head of Globa  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2019, 14:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: How Elisabeth Diana went from Haas alumna to Instagram’s Head of Global Communications
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Elisabeth Diana, MBA 08, is blunt when asked about her journey from business school to becoming head of Instagram Communications.

“It’s never an arc, first of all,” said Elisabeth, who spoke during a recent session on women’s leadership journeys led by Distinguished Teaching Fellow Professor Kellie McElhaney, founding executive director of Berkeley Haas’ Center for Equity, Gender, and Leadership... “It’s more like a maze.”

She said her time at Berkeley Haas taught her to think on her feet, make decisions with imperfect information, and practice the art of ruthless prioritization.

Journey to an MBA
Elisabeth’s career so far has centered around tech advertising and PR. After earning her undergraduate degree, she worked in account management for an advertising agency.

She realized she was ready to get an MBA while working on an ad campaign for Sprint. While sitting in on meetings with the CMO, discussing financials and statistical research “I remember thinking, ‘I kind of get what’s going on, but I think I could learn more to really understand, and dig in, and speak to this,’ ” she said. Knowing that she needed to hone her analytical skillset, she applied to business school, which she knew would equip her with the necessary tools.

Attend similar Haas admissions events

 

The power of networking
After earning her MBA from Haas, she went to work at Google in public affairs, where her boss became a mentor—and eventually pulled her in to Facebook, where she spent eight years. “I’m sure that’s a piece of career advice that a lot of you have experienced—to follow someone because they’re amazing. You’ve learned so much from them and you know there’s more to learn.” When that mentor left Facebook, she took his job.

When asked about stumbles along the way, she recalled trying to find a job during the recession: “Recessions happen. We’ll have another one at some point. Do not lose faith,” she said. She tapped her network at both Haas and UC Berkeley looking for jobs. “There’s this amazing network! Some of them don’t answer, but a lot of them do. So just keep going.”

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Authenticity in the workplace
Elisabeth runs a global team at Instagram. When asked what she’s most proud of, it’s clear she leads by example and empowers her team. “A lot of my job is making sure I get the best out of people,” she said. “I try to make sure I’m not funneling negative situations down to people and making them deal with them, but instead, providing that support and umbrella so they know I have their back.”

She also stressed the importance of showing vulnerability by asking for advice. “There are so many decisions that are being made at Facebook or Instagram where I say to the team, ‘I’m struggling with this too. This is hard for me, and I’m communicating this to you because I have to, but also, I am internally conflicted,’ ” she said. “And you know what? That actually resonates with people.”

Along the same lines, she advised women to “be vocal about what you want.” “You can’t expect people to read your mind if you’re looking for a new job or a new promotion or bigger budgets or bigger teams. You have to put it out to people who have the power to make those things happen.”

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Lessons learned at Haas
Elisabeth said Haas taught her confidence. “I think the motto ‘fake it until you make it’ is true. You see people who have confidence and mirror that because sometimes—or often times—they don’t know what they’re doing either,” she said. “No one knows what they’re doing all the time, by the way.”

She also credits Haas for teaching her crucial soft skills like negotiation and ruthless prioritization. “You would think in business school you’d have all this time and you’d feel like, ‘ah, this is sort of a vacation,’ ” she said. “But when you get to Haas, you have so many decision trees coming your way. I got really good at managing my time.”

The event was a joint effort put together by both the Full-Time MBA and Part-Time MBA admissions teams in collaboration with the Center for Equity, Gender, and Leadership. Haas alumna, Yi Zhang, EWMBA 18, graciously hosted the event at Wells Fargo in San Francisco.

Read more about Haas women in leadership

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Trends and outlooks: What it takes to be a Chief Innovation Officer  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2019, 08:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Trends and outlooks: What it takes to be a Chief Innovation Officer
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Over the last several decades, businesses have begun making space for Chief Innovation Officers. As the demand for candidates who can fill this role grows, Berkeley MBA studentsare increasingly expressing interest in this career trajectory.

The term Chief Innovation Officer (CIO) first surfaced in the book Fourth Generation R&D: Managing Knowledge, Technology, and Innovation in 1998. The same year the term was coined, Google filed for incorporation, and the first MP3 player was released.

The overlap of the new professional designation and the evolution of technology is no coincidence. The creation of the CIO title was a response to the business world’s need to keep pace in a fast-moving, technology-charged marketplace rife with new advancements.

Initially, the title was given to individuals who could create organizational innovation through technology. While a technology background is still a critical characteristic of the modern CIO, the responsibilities have shifted to meet today’s business needs in an ever-evolving world.

What is the makeup of the modern CIO and why is the role a critical component of every business? Continue reading to discover the answers.

Why Chief Innovation Officers are a critical component of the modern business
The pace of conducting business is increasing rapidly. Businesses today can’t relax. Instead, they must release new products at lightning speed. Customers demand products and services faster than ever, causing unique business challenges. On top of that, increased competition means that today’s work might be irrelevant tomorrow if a competing brand beats you to market.

To stay relevant, many companies are putting a hyper-focus on innovation to:

  • Rethink solutions to emerging business problems
  • Enhance products to satisfy ever-changing customer demands
  • Develop cutting-edge ideas that invite change and differentiation
  • Influence management’s perspective to adapt to change quickly
Enabling change in business can be difficult, especially in well-established organizations. These time-tested businesses can fall victim to relying on business practices and processes that cater to short-term goals, creating resistance to innovation that might favorably impact a business in the long-term.

Driving innovation requires time and buy-in from various stakeholders. By delegating a single person as a CIO, it becomes easier to sort through ideas, surface the best ones, and rally support to reduce friction while bringing new projects to market.

What are the Chief Innovation Officer’s duties?
Though CIO is a working title — and can vary from organization to organization — the general outline of the position is roughly defined by the following key functions:

  • Have a finger on the pulse of the market: First and foremost, CIOs must analyze marketplace trends and disruptions to determine viable opportunities.
  • Cultivate a space for new ideas to be born: People often assume the CIO is the “idea person” and that’s where his or her role ends. In most cases, this isn’t true. The CIO is responsible for developing ideas raised by employees, too. A successful CIO encourages continued collaboration by providing brainstorming forums like hackathons, training seminars, and internal or external crowdsourcing.
  • Develop a methodology: Decision-making, critical thinking, and measured risk-taking are all soft skills acquired through MBA programs specializing in innovation and entrepreneurship. They also are components of a CIOs day-to-day job. CIOs must determine which ideas to carry out or kill, and which should be reserved for another day.
  • Determine the appropriate tools for success: To carry new ideas out, CIOs must identify tools and technology and implement new processes that make change possible.
  • Manage funding to carry out ideas: Moonshot ideas don’t often have funding to support them. By making connections between organizations through networking, the CIO can create formal agreements that help finance individual projects that don’t fall specifically within the scope of the existing business.
  • Execute ideas without disruption: CIOs need space to question the status quo while maintaining the trust of key stakeholders. As such, the CIO must be an excellent communicator so he or she can push ideas from the seed stage to the market without the ideas getting killed.
Just this year, UC Berkeley hired its first Chief Innovation and Entrepreneurship Officer (CIEO), Richard Lyons. The goal of Lyons’ new role is to utilize each of these functions highlighted above to illuminate Berkeley’s push toward innovation and entrepreneurship into the community.

What characteristics make a strong Chief Innovation Officer?
Staying true to the roots of the original CIO definition, a strong background in technology is a necessity for CIOs. Innovation springs from technology; for that reason, an emphasis in the following is useful:

  • Artificial intelligence
  • Machine learning
  • Cognitive computing
  • Robotic process automation
  • Blockchain technology
However, a background in technology isn’t the only requirement for a strong CIO. Other business skills are required for a CIO to thrive in all areas of his or her job.

Berkeley’s MBA curriculum is a great place to start when it comes to acquiring specific skills that will start you down the path toward the CIO title, for example:

As the role of CIO becomes common-place for many businesses, it will be exciting to see how the role continues to evolve, and how companies customize the position to suit their individual needs.

Ready to learn how to think and act like a CIO? Start with applied innovation courses at UC Berkeley Haas School of Business. Apply today.

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Trends and outlooks: What it takes to be a Chief Innovation Officer   [#permalink] 01 Oct 2019, 08:00

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