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Expert advice for Kellogg from Admissions Consultant blogs

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Expert advice for Kellogg from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2017, 11:17
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If you’re planning to apply to business school in the fall, you’re probably strategizing how you can create the strongest application possible. One of the biggest mistakes we see applicants make is assuming that the surest route to business school admission is playing it safe and doing what it seems like “everyone else” does. Not so!

“When submitting your materials for consideration, ensure that your total application, including the interview, reflects your authentic story,” urges the admissions team at Kellogg School of Management. “Above all else, be thoughtful, be honest and be yourself.”

Kellogg recently shared 10 ways to strengthen your MBA application, and we think their advice for identifying key focus areas holds true no matter where you apply.

Take a look at these excerpts:

Prepare a well-rounded application to convey intellectual ability and creativity.

Our goal is to ensure that you can handle the rigor in the Kellogg classroom. Your undergraduate GPA, course selection and GMAT score help us assess your readiness. But we’re also invested in finding creative thinkers who can solve problems. Qualitative evidence of intellectual ability is going to come out in your essays, your interview and your recommendations. We truly take a holistic look at our applicants rather than only relying on a number.

Highlight the quality of your professional experience, regardless of where you are in your career, to distinguish your application.

The Kellogg experience is enriched by the diversity of our student body, both personally and professionally. We admit applicants from a variety of fields, with varying years of experience. We also consider each applicant within the context of his or her own career path, rather than against each other. Be sure to include your resume and details to help us understand what the career advancement standards are within your industry and your particular company or organization.

Share how you have made an impact on the world around you.

Passion and engagement are universal features within the Kellogg community, and there are a lot of ways to show us that you’re the type of person who makes a difference, whether inside your workplace or through activities outside of the office.

Click on over to the Kellogg blog to read the other seven tips, and remember: no two people are the same, and that’s a good thing! The key to a successful MBA application is showing exactly what you—and nobody else but you—can bring to the program. So please don’t be afraid to let your originality and your true personality come through in your materials.

 
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Expert advice for Kellogg from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2017, 11:18
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If you’re planning to apply to business school in the fall, you’re probably strategizing how you can create the strongest application possible. One of the biggest mistakes we see applicants make is assuming that the surest route to business school admission is playing it safe and doing what it seems like “everyone else” does. Not so!

“When submitting your materials for consideration, ensure that your total application, including the interview, reflects your authentic story,” urges the admissions team at Kellogg School of Management. “Above all else, be thoughtful, be honest and be yourself.”

Kellogg recently shared 10 ways to strengthen your MBA application, and we think their advice for identifying key focus areas holds true no matter where you apply.

Take a look at these excerpts:

Prepare a well-rounded application to convey intellectual ability and creativity.

Our goal is to ensure that you can handle the rigor in the Kellogg classroom. Your undergraduate GPA, course selection and GMAT score help us assess your readiness. But we’re also invested in finding creative thinkers who can solve problems. Qualitative evidence of intellectual ability is going to come out in your essays, your interview and your recommendations. We truly take a holistic look at our applicants rather than only relying on a number.

Highlight the quality of your professional experience, regardless of where you are in your career, to distinguish your application.

The Kellogg experience is enriched by the diversity of our student body, both personally and professionally. We admit applicants from a variety of fields, with varying years of experience. We also consider each applicant within the context of his or her own career path, rather than against each other. Be sure to include your resume and details to help us understand what the career advancement standards are within your industry and your particular company or organization.

Share how you have made an impact on the world around you.

Passion and engagement are universal features within the Kellogg community, and there are a lot of ways to show us that you’re the type of person who makes a difference, whether inside your workplace or through activities outside of the office.

Click on over to the Kellogg blog to read the other seven tips, and remember: no two people are the same, and that’s a good thing! The key to a successful MBA application is showing exactly what you—and nobody else but you—can bring to the program. So please don’t be afraid to let your originality and your true personality come through in your materials.

 
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Expert advice for Kellogg from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2017, 11:28
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Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management is a close-knit community that values a diverse community and philanthropy. At the same time, diversity in experience, background and thought is important to the Kellogg admissions committee.

Do your research on the programs, activities, clubs, classes and professors at Kellogg as you approach your essays. While you are reading and conversing with students and alumni, envision how you will contribute to the community.

Kellogg now has a video essay as part of the application process and it’s worth visiting the Kellogg FAQs site to learn more.

REQUIRED ESSAYS
Essay One: Kellogg’s purpose is to educate, equip & inspire brave leaders who create lasting value. Tell us about a time you have demonstrated leadership and created lasting value. What challenges did you face, and what did you learn? (450 words)

This essay focuses on leadership using a behavioral essay framework (the clue is “tell us about a time…”). The details about exactly what you did, said and learned in your leadership story communicate valuable information about how you approach issues and learn from experience.

When approaching this essay spend some limited time to set up the background of the story, and then use the majority of the space to describe specifically what you did, thought, felt and how you behaved. Use details to entice the reader and set yourself apart. A few well-placed specifics will add color without adding length to the essay.

The topic you choose can be anything regarding leadership. It might be a time that everything went perfectly smoothly and you learned how to work with a group or inspire people to action. On the other hand, it could be a challenging situation where you learned what not to do! Don’t be nervous about showing weakness here.

If you choose a challenging situation the learning part of the essay will be crucial. Show you can and do learn from experience. Every leader has to learn and develop, and willingness to be open to feedback and improve will be an asset to your application.

Do not neglect mentioning teamwork, which is a core value of Kellogg’s culture. Your leadership experience is likely part of a team at work or in an extracurricular activity, and sensitivity to teamwork and collaboration in any leadership story demonstrates maturity and social skills.

Essay Two: Pursuing an MBA is a catalyst for personal and professional growth. How have you grown in the past? How do you intend to grow at Kellogg? (450 words)

This essay question is a hybrid of a classic career goals essay and a personal essay. Kellogg is interested in candidates who are able to integrate their personal and professional goals and show how a Kellogg MBA will serve both sides of life.

When you describe professional and personal growth in the past, make sure it is relevant to your plans to pursue an MBA at Kellogg. The story you tell in this essay should provide insight into your decision to pursue an MBA and allude to your future goals. Because this isn’t a question about your entire career and personal life thus far, you should choose only one or two main experiences to share.

The topic of this essay should also be an experience that demonstrated growth over time. Perhaps you started in an entry-level position at work and progressed into a management role. Or maybe you learned more about yourself by switching jobs and careers, showing progression in your understanding of your goals and aspirations.

For the personal angle of the essay you could focus on a passion outside of work that has developed over time and led to personal growth. It’s also possible to have both personal and professional growth in your career. Many people mature significantly in the time period between college and graduate school and typically work and life both contribute to that growth.

VIDEO ESSAY
The Video Essay is one component of the application and provides you with an additional opportunity to demonstrate what you will bring to our vibrant Kellogg community – in an interactive way. You will respond to several short video essay questions. The questions are designed to bring to life the person we have learned about on paper.

One question will be a “get to know you” icebreaker type of question. The second question will be an opportunity to describe your plans for the future and how Kellogg will help you on that journey. The other questions will be randomly generated questions that will be similar to interview questions.

After you submit your application you will receive the video interview questions, one of which will focus on Why Kellogg and another will be a general “getting to know you” question. The video essay is an opportunity for the admissions committee to see the person behind the accomplishments you will describe.

Prepare as if you would for an interview, drafting the topics you want to cover and practicing your presentation. Writing some bullet points down in advance will help you remember and focus as you answer the questions.

The video should accurately portray your personality and demeanor, it’s a way for the admissions committee to see how you communicate non-verbally. Extensive preparation will help you be comfortable and be yourself when you are recording the video.

Kellogg allows you to practice with the video format a few times before you submit your official video, and it would be useful to do some additional rounds of practice in front of the camera. Use friends and family to give you feedback on your performance. Stacy Blackman Consulting also uses a video tool to provide feedback for you, contact us to learn more.

Dual-degree applicants: For applicants to the MMM or JD-MBA dual degree programs, please explain why that program is right for you. (250 words)

Doing your research on Kellogg MBA’s academics and resources will help you answer the question about why you need a dual degree to achieve your goals. If you are applying to the MMM program, you’ll have to show how the degree will prepare you more effectively for your career goals than the MBA alone.

Be able to articulate what is different about the Kellogg MMM program as compared to the MBA and other joint degrees. Know the classes you want to take, the professors you hope to work for, and how the MMM experience will be an asset in your future career.

Similarly, the JD-MBA at Kellogg is a highly competitive admissions process and will require a very clear explanation of what you will do with both degrees after school. Consider the unique attributes of the Kellogg JD-MBA program as compared to others, and also why you specifically need both a JD and an MBA to achieve your career goals.

Re-applicants: Since your previous application, what steps have you taken to strengthen your candidacy? (250 word limit)

In answering this question make sure you provide tangible evidence that you have improved the overall package you are submitting this year. Some of the most tangible improvements are a stronger GMAT score or grades from new quantitative classes you attended since the last time you applied.

Other steps that you can describe include a promotion at work, new volunteer activities, or increased responsibility at work or in your activities. If you don’t have something tangible and external to report, it’s reasonable to discuss how your career goals have changed or your personal aspirations have been refined as you revamped your applications.

Additional Information (Optional)
If needed, use this section to briefly describe any extenuating circumstances (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, etc.) (no word count)

If there are any areas of concern, this is the correct place to address them. Strike an upbeat tone here and avoid excuses. Explain your issue clearly and focus most of the essay on the correction for the issue. For example, if you had a disciplinary issue in college, spend most of the essay demonstrating that you learned from the experience and have been an ideal citizen ever since.

Low GPA issues should be explained here, and if there is a grade of C or below on your transcript the admissions committee will want to know why and feel comfortable it is an outlier in your overall academic record. For academic questions make sure you emphasize your improved performance either later in your college career or in subsequent work or classes since college.

 
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Expert advice for Kellogg from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2017, 12:02
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Northwestern University Provost Jonathan Holloway has announced that Kellogg School of Management’s Dean Sally Blount—the first woman to lead a global business school—will step down at the end of the 2017-18 academic year after solidifying Kellogg’s place among the world’s premier business schools.

In addition to finishing the school’s $350 million capital campaign in August with a record-setting $365 million dollars, a crowning achievement earlier this year was the opening of the 415,000-square-foot lakefront building on Northwestern’s Evanston campus known as the Kellogg Global Hub, for which Blount led the fundraising, oversaw the design and guided the move-in.

Dean Blount posted a video message to the Kellogg community explaining her decision to step down, calling it, “an ideal moment for a new leader to be selected, and to take the reins.”

“I’m so excited about Kellogg’s next chapter, but I’m also aware that this moment offers a rare opportunity in my own life,” Blunt says, noting that next summer will mark 30 years since she came to Kellogg as a young graduate student.

“This inflection point creates an opportunity for me the to start thinking bravely about my own life in the ways that I have about the institutions I’ve led. I’ve long dreamed of taking a sabbatical year, to travel and to write, and I want to spend some time thinking about my own final chapters in education as the pace of transformation accelerates in our marketplace.”

Provost Holloway expressed his deep appreciation for Blount’s collaborative approach and dynamic stewardship of Kellogg, and said he is excited to have her leading the school for one more year. Holloway will oversee an international search to select Blount’s successor during the coming academic year.

“It is truly one of my life’s greatest honors that when President Shapiro and former Provost Linzer selected me to be Kellogg dean, I became the first woman to lead a top global business school,” Blount concludes in the video, adding,”I am grateful to the thousands of you who have partnered with me to make Kellogg soar again.”

 
***

If you are looking for guidance on your Kellogg MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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New post 31 Oct 2017, 12:32
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The Economist has released its annual ranking of the best full-time MBA programs in the world, and U.S. b-schools dominate the list, taking 16 of the top 20 spots.  The Kellogg School of Management, which this year opened its $250 million state-of-the-art education center known as the Global Hub, has finally unseated local rival Chicago Booth School of Business, which held the top spot in The Economist’s rankings for five consecutive years.

Kellogg has made incredible strides toward the top over these past five years; it placed 23rd in the 2013 ranking, jumped to 14th place in 2014, rocketed to seventh in 2016, and landed in second place last year.

Average salaries of new MBA graduates at Kellogg were just under $124,000, a 72% increase over pre-MBA salaries, according to the ranking’s data. At Chicago Booth, meanwhile, new MBA grads had average salaries of $126,000 but a slightly lower salary increase at 71%.

The Economist’s Top Ten Best Full-Time MBA Programs 
  • Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management
  • University of Chicago Booth School of Business
  • Harvard Business School
  • University of Pennsylvania Wharton School
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business
  • UCLA Anderson School of Management
  • UC Berkeley Haas School of Business
  • Dartmouth Tuck School of Business
  • Columbia Business School
  • UV Darden School of Business
Rankings are inherently controversial—what makes a good MBA program varies for each individual—but The Economist aims to look at business schools from the students’ perspective.

Their responses on how well the program delivers the things students themselves cite as most important inform the criteria The Economist measures and the weightings they apply. Four factors have consistently emerged when students assess the quality of their MBA program:
  • open new career opportunities and/or further current career (35% weighting)
  • personal development and educational experience (35%)
  • increase salary (20%)
  • networking potential (10%)

While we don’t like to encourage clients to focus too heavily on rankings when they’re making their MBA program selections, we also know those headed for b-school really can’t help themselves. But placing too heavy an emphasis on rankings can actually become a distraction for some applicants, so be sure to consider multiple factors when making your final school selection.
Image credit: Mike Willis (CC BY-ND 2.0)
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Expert advice for Kellogg from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jan 2018, 14:52
Applying to business school is a process rife with decisions—which schools to target, which recommenders to choose, which essays to write—and a common one giving candidates some serious pause these days is which exam to take, the GMAT or the GRE? As the number of programs accepting the GRE continues to grow, aspiring MBAs are becoming more and more confused about this element of the application process.

In hopes of helping clarify the issue, mbaMission has teamed up with Manhattan Prep to create this new infographic comparing the classic GMAT and the increasingly popular GRE side by side. Quickly see how they differ, which test certain MBA programs accept, how the content and scores relate, and other useful details—and move a little closer to crossing another important decision off your to-do list!

Want to share our infographic on your site or blog? Copy and paste the code below.

<h3>mbaMission and Manhattan Prep’s GMAT vs. GRE Infographic</h3><a href=”https://www.mbamission.com/blog/2018/01/09/mbamission-and-manhattan-preps-gmat-vs-gre-infographic-new/”><img src=”https://www.mbamission.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/mbaMission-Infographic-2017-update-v5.jpg” alt=”mbaMission and Manhattan Prep’s GMAT vs. GRE Infographic” width=”700px” /></a><br><p><a href=”mbamission.com”>eg: Infographic By Domain.com</a></p>

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*Data collected in December 2017. Any subsequent variance in figures may be due to finalization or adjustment of data by the schools after our publication date.
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New post 28 Feb 2018, 17:42
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Alexa Loses Her Voice – Amazon Super Bowl LII Commercial

Sure, the Eagles’s first-ever Super Bowl win is a big deal, but according to a team of 50-odd MBA students at the Kellogg School of Management, Amazon was a big winner in strategic ad rankings with its “Alexa Loses Her Voice” ad in the 14th consecutive Kellogg School Super Bowl Advertising Review.

Two Kellogg marketing professors think businesses can learn a lot from which ads resonate with the audience, and for the past 14 years have been leading a panel of MBA students who grade the spots on their effectiveness in real time during the game.

“Amazon used a cast of celebrities that focused us on the brand, reinforced the equity in Alexa, and ultimately was fun to discuss and share with those around you,” says Derek D. Rucker, Sandy & Morton Goldman Professor of Entrepreneurial Studies in Marketing at the Kellogg School.

Other brands that earned top marks this year include Mountain Dew, Doritos, Tide, Avocados from Mexico, and Wendy’s.  “However, Squarespace and T-Mobile both missed the mark with questionable positioning and unclear calls to action,” Rucker notes. Each received an F for least effective advertising during this year’s Super Bowl.

The Kellogg School Super Bowl Advertising Review uses a strategic academic framework known as ADPLAN to evaluate the effectiveness of Super Bowl spots in building the advertiser’s brand. The acronym instructs viewers to grade ads based on:

Attention: Does the ad engage the audience?

Distinction: Is the execution unique in delivery?

Positioning: Is the appropriate category represented and a strong benefit featured?

Linkage: Will the brand and benefit be remembered?

Amplification: Are viewers’ thoughts favorable?

Net equity: Is the ad consistent with the brand’s history and reputation?

Two ongoing trends emerged throughout the big game – competitive angle in many ads and philanthropic efforts.

“As competitive as the game was, the category wars were equally competitive.  For example, there was hard hitting competition in the wireless wars with some brands calling one another out,” said Tim Calkins, Clinical Professor of Marketing at Kellogg, who co-leads the school’s Ad Review. “Many brands tried to appeal to viewers through philanthropic causes, including Toyota, Ram and Hyundai.”

However, social media backlash against the Ram advertisement, which featured a voice-over of a sermon by Martin Luther King Jr and a message of serving others, was immediate. Writes one sarcastic user on Twitter: “If you thought that MLK/Dodge commercial was bad, just wait until you see the upcoming Carl’s Jr. ad starring Gandhi.”

With a base price of $4.5 million for these ads, advertisers take an expensive gamble on commercial spots they hope will resonate and stick with consumers. The Ram ad may have garnered a C grade from the Kellogg team, but folks across the interwebs gave Ram a solid Fail for it.

A full list of the rankings is available here.

[image via screengrab]
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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Re: Expert advice for Kellogg from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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New post 04 Apr 2018, 11:23
Having the opportunity to learn from the best and brightest minds in business is one of the top motivators for many applicants considering an MBA degree at an elite business school. The professors and lecturers you’ll encounter have worked in the trenches, and bring an incredible wealth of real-world experiences into the classroom setting.

In our new limited series of professor interviews on the SBC blog, readers will get to know a bit more about these brilliant academics, what fields most excite them, the trends they foresee, what they enjoy most about teaching at their respective universities, and how it all comes together with their students.

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Today, we’re meeting Jose Maria Liberti, Clinical Professor of Finance at Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University and William M. Scholl Professor of Finance at Kellstadt Graduate School of Business, DePaul University.

Liberti was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He received a bachelor’s and master’s degree in economics from the Universidad de San Andres (UdeSA), in Buenos Aires.

He moved to the United States in 1998 and earned both a Masters and a PhD in Economics from The University of Chicago.

Courses Taught: Mergers and Acquisitions, LBOs and Corporate Restructuring; Global Entrepreneurial Finance
What triggered your interest in your subject matter?
I am an economist by education, but a practitioner by nature. Given my professional experience working in a financial institution before my graduate studies, I have always been interested in corporate finance in general and mergers and acquisitions in particular.

For example, problems between minority and controlling stakeholders were daily topics in my working years. While in my graduate studies (and given my personal interests), I found that the most interesting applications on incentives issues were in the field of corporate finance.
What’s changed since you entered the field? Any surprising or unique applications of your field of study?
The field has changed a lot. Even relative to my years of the PhD, the academic finance profession has shifted considerably. There was a period where the capital structure or the way you finance a project is irrelevant, and the only frictions that matter are probably only tax frictions.

Of course, scholars realized that the way you allocate the cash flows of the firm has some impact on the way the firm is run. But all this old academic literature focused on external rules being fixed.

What happens when the environment and rules change? People realized that the rules are not fixed, that the changing nature of the rules is actually important, and of course, political gain or incentive gains is what makes the rules change.

Topics like nepotism, crony capitalism and extraction of rents from other parties have been introduced, making finance an incredible stimulating and thought-provoking field.
What do you like about the school you are teaching at?
The Kellogg School of Management provides all the resources and makes my life as an educator very simple, providing me with all the adequate resources to provide a high-quality product to the students.

One great advantage, and most important, is the high quality of students that enroll in my classes. They are just outstanding, since they are willing to be challenged and pushed outside of their comfort zones.
What role, if any, does ethics play in your curriculum, and how has that evolved over time?
Transparency and ethical behavior of financial professionals have become key components in any academic finance curriculum. After the 2008 financial crisis, there has been larger focus in Kellogg’s finance curriculum on the role of ethical behavior.

This behavior is also tied to new regulations passed on monitoring the financial industry since new investors pay more attention to their financial professional’s ethical standards.

Given that we prepare financial professionals for the future, I feel I have the responsibility to make sure the message of ethical standards is properly conveyed in the classroom and in the finance curriculum in general.
What are you most excited about in your classroom?
The most excited part of my classes are the discussions we have among the students. Since I teach advanced classes in corporate finance, the exchange of ideas can become very lively and dynamic in the classroom. If you are not ready to engage in class discussions, these are not the courses you would like to enroll in!
Best advice for an aspiring business mogul?
The advice I’d give is simple: Just push yourself to the limits and give 150% on whatever you do. For me, this would leave a mark independent of what you are doing career-wise.
What’s the impact you want to leave on your students? … On the world?
I prefer to think that I do something small and the sum of those small things will hopefully affect the bigger scheme of things. If I can push students to think deeply on issues, challenge the status-quo, and be engaged and curious on financial strategy topics – a subject that for many students is challenging or daunting – then I would feel personally satisfied.

Thank you Professor Liberti for sharing your time and insights with our readers!
(Photo by Jean Lachat)
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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Re: Expert advice for Kellogg from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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New post 04 Apr 2018, 11:29
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Guest post by  Joe Marshall, Admissions Lead for Kellogg Veterans at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management
Transitioning out of the military can be a scary process.  Not only are you giving up the camaraderie and sense of mission that comes from service, but you’re also not sure what’s out there in corporate America and where you best fit.

For many veterans, going to business school is a fantastic opportunity to close skill gaps in functional business knowledge that enable you to better leverage leadership and other qualities honed in service.

However, the decision to apply for an MBA comes with its own set of unknowns. What should I put in my resume?  What schools should I apply to?  How do I knock off the rust from five years spent doing ruck marches instead of math to study for the GMAT?

Luckily, just like in the military, there is a lineage of veterans who have made a similar transition and are happy to assist you not only in getting accepted to an MBA program, but also in finding the right fit for you and your goals.

Here are five lessons I learned from my MBA applications.
Start GMAT Prep Early
For some the GMAT is a one-and-done deal, for others it requires perseverance and multiple attempts to hit that target score. The test covers math and verbal concepts that most veteran applicants have not dealt with in years.

The earlier in the process that you start studying for this test, the greater the likelihood that this part of the application will be in the rear-view mirror as you prepare your resume and essays for submission.

The test is valid for five years, so there is almost no applicant looking at business schools for whom it is “too early” to start studying for the GMAT. If you are still studying for that last retake of the GMAT as application deadlines approach, your essays and other materials will likely suffer as a result.
Reach Out to Veteran Communities at Target Schools
One of the best lessons a young service member can learn is to not unnecessarily recreate the wheel. The same lesson applies to business school applications.  There are veteran communities at every school who were in your shoes just a few years prior.

Find these veteran association websites and connect with their admissions reps.  These clubs, like the Kellogg Veterans Association, for which I serve as Admissions Lead, are happy to help because somebody did the exact same thing for them when they were applying. Do not hesitate to reach out, and more importantly, be prepared to give back in the same way once you hit campus.
Translate Your Resume
An important role these veteran clubs will play is to help translate your resume to properly convey your accomplishments to a wider audience. A common misconception is that your military experience does not give you marketable skills to a civilian employer.

This is certainly not the case, but the problem often lies in how these skills are presented to civilian employers. Work with those who transitioned before you to remove jargon and convey your accomplishments and skills in a manner that will properly demonstrate the value you will bring to that organization.
Tailor Your Essays to the School
For many veterans, it will make sense to work with an admissions consultant to package your story in the most effective way possible.  Each school will have a particular prompt that requires a unique answer that incorporates the school’s culture and distinctive traits.

Work with current students at that school to gain an understanding for what makes that school special and why you would be a great fit.

No matter the approach, starting early in your research pays dividends in the days before the deadline. Admissions reps for clubs will be inundated with essays and calls in the days before the deadline, but have much more time to work on a personal basis in the weeks leading up to it.  Proactive applicants are able to refine and hone their message, leading to more effective essays.
Visit Target Schools
I would strongly discourage anybody from attending a school they did not visit first. You want to get a feel for the community, surrounding area, and whether this is someplace that you would enjoy spending the next two years of your life.

If your travel schedule permits, preview days at schools provide a great opportunity to get a feel for that school long before you even click submit on the application.  Many schools host a military or veteran preview day to showcase the school and answer specific questions and concerns that veterans often have.
Now, Come Check Out Kellogg!
Kellogg is hosting an upcoming Military Preview Day on March 16th at its brand new building, the Global Hub. This event will include a mock class taught by a renowned faculty member, an alumni panel, current-students panel, and presentations from our admissions, career management, and financial-aid departments. 

The event will conclude with a dinner in downtown Evanston with current veteran students. Those in need of lodging can stay with a current student as part of our Sofas for Soldiers program.  Sign up here . Looking forward to seeing many of you in Evanston!

 
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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Re: Expert advice for Kellogg from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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Poonam, founder and president of myEssayReview, is publishing interviews of her most recent successful students.  This is the latest in the series. Here is a chat with Mansi, who was accepted into 5 top MBA programs –Kellogg, Wharton, INSEAD, Stanford, and Harvard. Mansi is headed to Harvard, her dream school.

Mansi’s interview is published in 4 parts wherein she shares her background, goals, reasons to pursue MBA, unwavering preference for HBS, application strategy and preparation, her success mantra, advice on video essays, and much more.

Now presenting the concluding part of the interview wherein Mansi shares her success mantra and her personal interests and  hobbies.

Poonam: What is the Mantra of your astounding success? Not many people are able to achieve what you have achieved. That is why I would like to know  about the Mantra of your phenomenal success.

Mansi: That is a tough one. I think everyone will have their own set of ways to achieve their goal. For me, number one mantra is hard work. In life, there is no short cut to success. It is the way you look at things. You have to have sleepless nights, and long days, and give enough time to achieve your goal, sacrifice other things in the life, and still maintain a balance. As you had rightly suggested- start early. The best way is to start early to give ample time to application.

The second Mantra is ‘strategy’. If I had pushed myself to apply to Harvard in Round I and had not listened to you, I am sure I could not have accomplished it. The kind of story that I had in Round I or the kind of confidence I had in my story in Round I was much less compared to what I had in Round II. Again, I came to know myself a lot more in  four five months than the two months I had before Round I deadlines. So you have to  strategize really well because your dream school deserves the best of your time, your strategy, and your hard work.  I would advise applicants to  give it enough time and thought, and strategize well.

The third Mantra is the ‘introspection’. Indian applicants have never gone through such a process; they have only prepared course material and taken exams. But B- school application is entirely a different process. It does have an exam which requires a lot of introspection, and it also has an interview process which truly focuses on your soft skills. Lastly, working on your weaknesses is also very important for which self-reflection is the key because unless you know your worth yourself, you will not know what you are weak at. Especially for the interview processes, you should be confident of handling your weaknesses and what you can do to mitigate them.

Poonam: That is right. It is a process of self-discovery, and by the time you reached Harvard Application, you had already discovered yourself.

Mansi: Absolutely.

Poonam: And I have memorized all your stories by heart.

Mansi: Yes. I know. And sometimes, I was actually amazed, when you would return my essays with comments that  this example does not fit this essay as much as the other example. You remembered all my stories which at times I had forgotten. You rightly said that this is a process of self-discovery. I also remember the 30 minute Harvard interview that happened in Mumbai; those 30 minutes felt like 3 hours, as we had a conversation which I would normally have with somebody in 3 hours. It was short, yet it covered almost every aspect of my life, professional as well as personal. If I had not known about myself that well, I could not have given that 3 hours’ worth of information in thirty minutes.

Poonam: True.  It has truly been a long and arduous journey. You must have made many personal sacrifices as well. Would you like to share those with us?

Mansi: Yes, Poonam. Very rightly said. You have to work hard towards what is really important to you. And in that particular process, you have to sacrifice other things to achieve what you really want to. As you are aware, I am married, and I had sacrificed a lot of my family time. At the same time, I am really thankful to my husband who has been immensely supportive all this while. I had to miss family time, festivals, get -togethers, and weddings. I am blessed to have a supportive family and husband. I will share this one particular incident when we were celebrating Deepawali at my in-laws place in Mumbai. I had gotten my first interview invite from Kellogg which was right after Deepawali, and  my husband prepared for all pooja and stuff while I was preparing for my interview questions. So yes, I had sacrificed a lot of different things- birthdays, family functions,  TV and movies, but I am sure that at the end of day, those are totally worth it.

Poonam: Definitely. They all must be very proud of you for this extraordinary achievement. I am proud of you.

Mansi: Thank you, Poonam. Yes, they are.

Poonam:  Let us talk about something outside of professional area. What are your hobbies, interests? What are your favorite books?

Mansi: As you know very well, I love to dance. Throughout my entire application process, I used to go for my dance class at least once a week to rejuvenate myself. I occasionally read science fiction. I am not a regular reader though.

Poonam: You are a certified Scuba diver as well.

Mansi: Yes. I am a certified scuba diver. I have dived in many countries such as Malaysia, India, Maldives, and Thailand. I can dive up to 18ft. Next month, I and my husband are going to Thailand for another diving trip after a gap of one year.

Poonam: Very good. Mansi, will you like to share anything that I have not asked?

Mansi: I have discussed almost all the aspects of application process. Again, key parts of your application process are- have a strong GMAT score, partner with a good consultant, strategize in which Round and which schools you apply to, start early, give yourself enough time for self-reflection, and definitely work hard. There is no short cut to success. Give your best. I am sure you can achieve what you want.

Poonam: Thank you for sharing your story. Your story will be inspirational for the prospective applicants.

Mansi: Thank you, Poonam. This is not only my story; this is your story as well.

Poonam: It is really nice of you to think that way.

Mansi:  This is a process you can’t do alone. This is a process where you need supportive people around you. So equal amount of thank you to you as well.

Poonam: Thank you so much. It was my privilege. I really enjoyed being part of your MBA journey. And I wish you good luck with Harvard. I hope you will have a wonderful time there. I will like to get in touch with you later.

Mansi: Definitely. I will keep you updated with my case studies at HBS.

Poonam: Wonderful. Thank you. It was a pleasure chatting with you.

Note: 

Part 1- Mansi's Background, Goals, Reasons to do MBA, and Preference for HBS

http://myessayreview.com/student-interviews/indian-engineers-journey-5-top-mba-programs-including-dream-school-harvard/

Part 2- Mansi's' Application Strategy, Planning and Preparation

http://myessayreview.com/student-interviews/indian-engineers-journey-5-top-mba-programs-including-dream-school-harvard-part-2/

Part 3- Mansis’ Most Challenging Part of the Application Process, and her advice on video essays

http://myessayreview.com/student-interviews/indian-engineers-journey-5-tops-mba-programs-including-dream-school-harvard-part-3/

This interview was first published in  myEssayReview blog.

For questions, email Poonam at poonam@myessayreview.com

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Re: Expert advice for Kellogg from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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Poonam, founder and president of MER (myEssayReview), is publishing   interviews of her successful students as well as first year and second year students.  This is the latest in the series. Here is a chat with Eduardo, a second-year student at Kellogg.

In a candid video interview with Poonam, Eduardo shares his application experience, his amazing experiences at Kellogg, and offers valuable advice for the prospective applicants, regarding application process, goals, campus life, and recruitment.

The transcript of Eduardo’s Interview will be published in 2 parts.

In Part 1, he talks about his background, career goal, application experience, and the challenges he faced during the process . He also explains at length how Kellogg was the best fit for him.

Poonam: Hello, Eduardo, Welcome back.

Eduardo: Thank you.

Poonam: Last time we chatted was 2 years back when you were getting all set to start your Kellogg journey. And now you are a second-year student almost ready to graduate. So how does it feel? What changes have taken place in these two years?

Eduardo: Yes. I think, for me a lot has changed. I have made important life and career decisions. I have only two, or three months to go, and I don’t want to leave. And I really would love to stay more. I am enjoying every day and week of my final quarter at Kellogg. At the same time, I am very excited for the career path I am taking. Yes, it is really a transformative experience. I met a lot of amazing people and have many friendships. I have travelled like crazy. I have changed my career plan a couple of times, and I am ending up in that industry. Also, I got married which is a big thing.

Poonam: Congratulations. That’s great news.

Eduardo: Thank you. That was not planned originally before the MBA, but it ended up happening. MBA is a catalyst for change in many ways. Yes, these were two amazing years of my life.

Poonam: Absolutely. I am happy to know that. Eduardo, for those who have not read your previous interview will you like to tell something about yourself, where are you from and where did you study as an undergrad?

Eduardo: Sure. I am a Brazilian, born and raised in Sao Paulo, and I studied business during undergrad back in Sao Paulo. I started my career in Marketing which was my passion so I did 7 years of marketing and product management in a manufacturing industry. I loved my job but also felt that I was too focused in Brazil and Latin America and I wanted to have a global career. An MBA was a unique opportunity to have that global opportunity and also because I wanted to make some bigger impact in the long run back in Brazil but for that I felt like I needed to do something abroad for a while and learn and bring the knowledge and opportunities back to my country. Also, I came to Kellogg with a one plan of resuming my career in the same industry but then a lot changed, and I’m now switching to the technology industry

Poonam: Looking back, you received admit offers from Haas, UCLA, Yale, and Kellogg, all with substantial scholarships, but you finally chose Kellogg. How is Kellogg the best school for you and how are you the best fit for Kellogg?

Eduardo: As evident from the choices of schools I  made and was admitted to, I wanted a collaborative school. Kellogg was the only one that is not only collaborative and fun like smaller schools such as Berkeley and Yale, but also has resources of a large school. Kellogg has a number of programs - the two-year MBA is almost 500 students, plus students from other programs such as the MMM, the one-year program, the JD and MD , which make Kellogg really large. The speakers come to campus on different classes on niche subjects, so we not only enjoy many resources of a large school, but also enjoy the collaborative and fun environment of a smaller school. This is only possible at Kellogg because they really care about the culture, select candidates that align with the culture, and allow us to have this interesting combination of a smaller and large school.

In addition, Evanston and Chicago also mirror that idea. Most people live in Evenson; it is a small city north of Chicago that has grocery stores, restaurants and, bars etc. My commute is amazing as I can walk to my school. So, I have all the benefits of living in a small city, but at the same time I have Chicago, 30 minutes away, where we can go to parties in amazing restaurants, and enjoy other conveniences of a large city.

Poonam: A perfect mix of small and big school. Great! Looking back, what was the most challenging aspect of your application process, what was the challenge, how you overcame it?

Eduardo: For me, essays were the most challenging piece. I recognize that most people say that GMAT is the most challenging part, but for me the path was a little different.  I spent a lot of time on the GMAT. I was lucky that I had people that advised me to start early for the GMAT; I did that at the beginning of my career, way before I applied to business schools. I did spend a lot of time on that, but I knew what I had to do, so I think it was challenging in terms of time but it was not intellectually challenging. But essays were more challenging because initially, I was not comfortable, getting at the personal level of the stories; I really had to overcome that challenges and get deep into my personality. I spent a lot of time on my essays, and I thought I was doing a great job. Then, I remember, in the month of June, I decided to hire you for one essay only for one school because I wanted to double check if it would go in the right direction. And after your first review, I clearly understood that I was on the wrong path.  I trashed all the essays I had already written for many schools and started all over again. I think I learned a lot in the process. You taught me how to really get personal and write, which stories to tell, and how to tell those stories.   It was an amazing process, but definitely essays were something that required me to get out of my comfort zone and understand what it was all about.

Poonam: Exactly. I enjoyed the process, too.

Eduardo: Thank you.

This interview was first published in myEssayReview blog.

Note: Stay tuned to Eduardo’s interview Part 2 wherein he  shares his memorable experiences at Kellogg and   offers valuable advice to  the prospective applicants, especially international applicants regarding goals, campus life, and recruitment.

You may connect with Eduardo via linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/eduardostumpfsilva/

For questions, email Poonam at poonam@myessayreview.com

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Re: Expert advice for Kellogg from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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Poonam, founder and president of MER (myEssayReview), is publishing interviews of her successful students as well as first year and second year students.  This is the latest in the series. Here is a chat with Eduardo, a second-year student at Kellogg.

In a candid video interview with Poonam, Eduardo shares his application experience, his amazing experiences at Kellogg, and offers valuable advice for the prospective applicants, regarding application process, goals, campus life, and recruitment.

The transcript of Eduardo’s video Interview is  published in 2 parts.  In this second and concluding part , Eduardo  explains how his experiences  in and outside of classroom shaped his career and personality and  transformed him . Also, he advises the incoming students, specifically international students, about their career goals, involvement  in activities/events at Kellogg, and recruitment process.

Poonam: What is your favorite thing about the program? Would you please share your best experiences in and out of the class that helped shape your career?

Eduardo: Definitely. There are a lot of things to share. I will share some of them otherwise we will be talking here for hours and hours. I will definitely start with the outside-the-classroom experiences because these are the ones that really mattered to me. The Global Lab program was special for me as in this program students go to a country and do consulting for a client. The client can be a company or the government, or a NGO in different parts of the world.  I did a global lab in Ecuador this past spring break. This is a six-month consulting program wherein you get to visit the client. I was there in Ecuador for one week. I am in a project for the Government of Ecuador, our direct client, for which I visited farmers and food processing plants, and helped the farmers to increase their income on their production of hearts of palm and golden berries, which grow very well in Ecuador. Having those interactions with farmers and government officials and understanding what their struggles are, is what I enjoy the most because I can use these learnings to make an impact. This is an amazing experience because in the process you visit different places and have a lot of fun with the colleagues.

So in  general, what I liked most about Kellogg was the opportunities for experiential learning outside the classroom. For example, I did a Marketing Lab which is also consulting for revamping a digital marketing strategy for a large retailer in USA. I visited the client a couple of times, and we had amazing faculty supporting our team along the way and providing us coaching. We also had support of a consulting company for coaching purposes. We had a big challenge and a big outcome at the end. So what I learned at Kellogg was  relevant and impactful to companies.

In addition to Labs, I did couple of other things.  Another experimental learning I would highlight is the mentorship for undergrad students from Northwestern, That has been an extremely interesting experience, so in addition to learning about coaching in a class room, I was also able to practice that. For me, it has been an amazing way of connecting with people in deep way, and I will probably continue to provide that coaching to undergrads beyond my time at Kellogg. Those personal relationships that you forge are amazing.

In the classroom, I had amazing classes. Customer Analytics is the one that I would highlight for those interested in technology, and I had professor Florian Zettelmeyer who is amazing. There is also a Negotiation class wherein you practice a lot of negotiations with your colleagues, which is lot of fun.

Poonam: Great. Great to know that you are having a wonderful time at Kellogg. I was wondering if there is there anything you will like to change about Kellogg?
Eduardo: Well. I am not sure how to change it. But one thing that nearly everyone experiences at Kellogg is the fear of missing out on events because there are so many things going on every week.  So you have speakers coming to campus for lunch and for evening sessions. Also, we have a lot of opportunities to be an entrepreneur or working with startups at the Garage, a place where startups of Kellogg are. There are so many things going on, and what happens is that we have a fear of missing out on these. For example, I am one hour into the event and then one hour at another place in Evanston or Chicago. I just want to be everywhere, and I end up being a little bit over-stressed and overwhelmed. However, in second year we have a better ability of focusing on things that really matter to us and managing fun and work, because at business school it is all a big mix, as we do not have a clear weekend in a week. We are doing case competition over the weekend, and then you are having a party on Tuesday, so we have to manage and make choices of what is important to us. There is an initiative at Kellogg called the ‘Good Life’, which helps people reflect, and I think it is a very good initiative that helps people to calm down and think about the things they should prioritize   and not be overwhelmed and stressed out with all the things that are available there.

Poonam: Is there anything that you wish you had known earlier, before you started your journey at Kellogg? Can you share some advice to incoming students to Kellogg to make their adjustment easier?

Eduardo: Yes, definitely.  I think that it is true for me as well as for most international students, and that is not only for Kellogg but across different schools. I wish I had known earlier that recruiting is very intense, and it starts very early in the process, no matter which school you are in, because ultimately it is the timing for the recruiters and not for the schools. So my advice is you need to reflect early on, on the things that you want to do. I thought naively that I could have 2 to 3 years of reflections on what I want to do and consider different career paths. The realty is that you do not have two years to reflect, you just spend a couple of months or may be the first two or three months to reflect, and then from there you start recruiting for internship, and then internship is a big change in terms of industries. If you are international, your internship definitely needs to start to carve the path for your ultimate goal which makes it even more important that you actually invest some time at the beginning of your MBA, reflect on your career by talking to people, to second year students, and understand different choices you have. And simply be aware that recruiting is very intense that will simply take away a big chunk of your MBA experience.

So I will recommend especially to international students to understand the importance of networking in USA, and invest time early on networking really hard because that will open up amazing opportunities. But if you do not do it or leave it for a later stage in the recruiting process, as I think many international do, then you may have a problem.  I assumed that the recruiting process would be similar to what I had experienced in Brazil, but that was not the case. It is a process that you have to invest much more time, so I strongly suggest the prospective students to think hard about their goals from the very start and reflect what you want to do in the first couple of months, then dedicate time for recruiting and for networking early on because that will pay off handsomely later on.

Poonam: It sure is a valuable advice, especially for international students. What are your plans after graduation? Are your goals still the same?

Eduardo: Yes, my goals have changed considerably. Originally, I was planning to resume my career in the manufacturing industry in Brazil.   The reasoning for that was my ultimate goal of making an impact in Brazil by helping people, particularly in low income families, to improve. My long-term goal has not changed. But I realized that if I stay for a couple of years in the Silicon Valley, I will be much more equipped to bring skills to help me join a startup or a tech company in Brazil that could really drive growth and job creation. So for that I decided to stay in the USA. I interned at CISCO for my internship for the summer, and I will resume my career there as a Product Manager. I want to spend a couple of years in the bay area and Silicon Valley, learn a lot from the different big trends that are happening in the valley and be equipped to go back to Brazil where I make the impact that I wanted to make originally anyway. It is a big change for me, and I am very excited.

Poonam: Yes, so the long terms goals are the same. Eduardo, is here anything that I didn’t ask and you will like to share?

Eduardo: Yes, I think that my big piece of advice for anyone starting an MBA is to come with an open mind. If you come with an open mind, you take advantage of the opportunities on a whole different level. For example, you may have a career plan, and it is good to have a plan from day one, but really take a step back when you come to the campus, and  talk to second year students , talk to people that have tried different areas, and then different industries and roles, and take classes for professors that are simply awesome professors, and they will inspire you for different directions. I had a class on finance that I was really impressed with though I am not a big finance guy, and at some point, I even considered a career in that because that professor was so inspiring.

Poonam:  Can you please tell us the name of the professor?

Eduardo:  Yes, it is David Matsa. I did a couple of classes of Finance II with him. Beside him, there are several professors that will inspire you, no matter what your interests are at Kellogg. So, i would advise to come with an open mind for your career, for the types of people you meet. I think it is only natural that you tend to be in a community that is from your industry or from your country but try to break free from those groups. Participate in clubs and events, as these are all opportunities. I think breaking free of those close communities will take you into unexpected paths. So my final piece of advice is to come with an open mind and be ready for new things. MBA is not an opportunity for you to be completely focused only on academics but exploring new options. Academics is something important, but it is probably a small piece of the overall big picture of the things that you want to learn while doing an MBA.

Poonam:  Wonderful. Is there anything else that you would like to share with viewers? Any clubs that you have been part of?

Eduardo: Oh for me, one thing that I learned at Kellogg is that I think many applicants come to the MBA with an idea of leading a club, and that is like one way you can impact your community, but that is definitely not the only way. I think if you want to have leadership experiences, there are many ways you can do that. Also, if you want to contribute to the community which I think is ultimately what being joining a club is all about, there are different ways you can do it as well. So I think if you want to lead a club, or join a club, or whatever initiative you have, you should have a vision of something that you can contribute to your class, and to your colleagues and to the community as a whole, and if you find that sweet spot of having a particular set of skills and an opportunity to contribute, that is what you should choose. In my case, I wanted to have mentorship experience and that is why I have been coaching North Western university undergrads. I think I have been able to give a lot to those students and have learned from that experience.

Also, I have also been a reader for the Kellogg in the admission process. Basically, the students are trained to read the applications, in addition to a number of other reviewers including the Office of Admissions, but we do contribute to the admission process, and I believe that I bring some experience that is helpful in that sense to better evaluate candidates I also provided consulting for an NGO ‘Dream for Kids’ in Chicago. I have helped to improve their program and their plan for growth, providing support for underprivileged students. I was the project leader, and I felt that I could really contribute to that.  It was deeply connected to my experience with NGO related work in Brazil.

Poonam: In fact, I was going to ask you about your voluntary work in Brazil. That was significant contribution to the community.

Eduardo: I have done a couple of years of NGO in Brazil. Focus on education for different NGOs has been my passion, and I found an opportunity to continue that contribution in Chicago. So when you think about clubs, the most important thing is you should find those kind of opportunities that really fit with you and make you contribute to the community in a unique way.

Poonam: Very true. Thank you, Eduardo for sharing  your Kellogg experience with us. I am sure your insights and valuable advice will be very helpful to the prospective applicants, especially to those who are applying to Kellogg.   Thank you so much.

Eduardo: Thank you, Poonam.  I am happy to chat. Kellogg is an amazing school, and I will encourage  everyone to apply to Kellogg, and I think that you probably have  links to my linked in profile.  I am happy to chat about Kellogg and  the culture at Kellogg on a personal basis if anyone is interested. I had a wonderful time, and I am happy to share that experience with whoever is interested. And obviously thanks for your support as well for making this possible. We had an amazing time together. Thank you.

Poonam: Thank you. It was my privilege to work with you, and I really enjoyed chatting with you today. Thank you and best of luck for your personal and professional life in your post Kellogg career.

Eduardo: Thank you. Have a nice day. Bye.

You can connect with Eduardo via LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/in/eduardostumpfsilva
Link to Video Interview with Eduardo:
 https://youtu.be/EC5-d4LkPKE
Part 1 of Eduardo's Interview:
Background, Application Experience, Most challenging Part of Application process & Preference for Kellogg

http://myessayreview.com/student-interv ... ce-advice/

For questions, email Poonam at poonam@myessayreview.com

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Note :  This Interview was first published in  myEssayReview blog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Re: Expert advice for Kellogg from Admissions Consultant blogs   [#permalink] 07 May 2018, 12:22
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