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For all his managerial and executive ability , President

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For all his managerial and executive ability , President  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2012, 02:04
15
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

46% (00:48) correct 54% (01:03) wrong based on 504 sessions

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For all his managerial and executive ability, President Hoover was often awkward and uncomfortable in his dealings with people.

a)

b) For all that he was an able manager and executive

c) Despite him being an able manager and executive

d) Able as he was in being a manager and executive

e) Even having managerial and executive abilities



She is pretty for her age.
Does "for" in this question have the same meaning as the example above?
If it doesn't, what does it mean in the context of the sentence?
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Re: PT #16 SC 13  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2012, 02:27
'For' in your example is a conjunction and 'for' in the question you posted acts as a preposition. Its a prepositional phrase and an idiom as well.
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Re: PT #16 SC 13  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2012, 03:17
Can someone please explain why A is right.
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Re: For all his managerial and executive ability , President  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2013, 06:55
"For all his executive and managerial ability"...
I was stuck between A and D. The only reason I chose D, despite it being wordy was that I thought "ability" should be "abilities".
Can someone please clarify this?
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Re: For all his managerial and executive ability , President  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2013, 11:28
3
1
eybrj2 wrote:
For all his managerial and executive ability, President Hoover was often awkward and uncomfortable in his dealings with people.

a)

b) For all that he was an able manager and executive

c) Despite him being an able manager and executive

d) Able as he was in being a manager and executive

e) Even having managerial and executive abilities



She is pretty for her age.
Does "for" in this question have the same meaning as the example above?
If it doesn't, what does it mean in the context of the sentence?


Yes, for has the same meaning as your example sentence. You could substitue the word "Despite" and the meaning would be the same.

Even though this is an old question (paper test), it has some good meaning elements.

A - This option is grammatically correct and has sensible meaning - "Despite managerial strenghts, Hoover was awkward with people".
B - This phrase really doesn't have a sensible meaning at all.
C - I like the word "Despite" more than "for", but the GMAT threw in "being" to invalidate the answer. This choice comes in an old test when "being" was always wrong on the GMAT.
D - Different construction that could work out from a meaning standpoint, but we have the same issue with "being" as we see in C.
E - "Even" doesn't convey the same meaning as "for" or "despite". It's close, but "even" doesn't show the sharp contract between ability and awkwardness.

KW
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Re: For all his managerial and executive ability , President  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2013, 11:49
KyleWiddison wrote:
For all his managerial and executive ability, President Hoover was often awkward and uncomfortable in his dealings with people.
Yes, for has the same meaning as your example sentence. You could substitue the word "Despite" and the meaning would be the same.

Even though this is an old question (paper test), it has some good meaning elements.

A - This option is grammatically correct and has sensible meaning - "Despite managerial strenghts, Hoover was awkward with people".
B - This phrase really doesn't have a sensible meaning at all.
C - I like the word "Despite" more than "for", but the GMAT threw in "being" to invalidate the answer. This choice comes in an old test when "being" was always wrong on the GMAT.
D - Different construction that could work out from a meaning standpoint, but we have the same issue with "being" as we see in C.
E - "Even" doesn't convey the same meaning as "for" or "despite". It's close, but "even" doesn't show the sharp contract between ability and awkwardness.

KW

A and C both looked good for me and I went with C somehow... Can you please educate me why C is deemed to be wrong? Thanks.
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Re: For all his managerial and executive ability , President  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2013, 22:08
Amateur wrote:
A and C both looked good for me and I went with C somehow... Can you please educate me why C is deemed to be wrong? Thanks.


C totally changes the meaning of the original sentence. The original sentence never says that he was "manager and executive"; he just had those "abilities".
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Re: For all his managerial and executive ability , President  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Nov 2013, 06:58
saumya12 wrote:
Amateur wrote:
A and C both looked good for me and I went with C somehow... Can you please educate me why C is deemed to be wrong? Thanks.


C totally changes the meaning of the original sentence. The original sentence never says that he was "manager and executive"; he just had those "abilities".

Many mention that 'being' is an automatic disqualifier in most of the cases... In other posts a few were mentioning 'being' is not wrong in all the cases..... When can we expect the use of 'being'? Do you have any idea?
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Re: For all his managerial and executive ability , President  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Sep 2015, 01:52
This post might help

when-you-should-eliminate-being-the-answer-is-here-141086.html

Amateur wrote:
saumya12 wrote:
Amateur wrote:
A and C both looked good for me and I went with C somehow... Can you please educate me why C is deemed to be wrong? Thanks.


C totally changes the meaning of the original sentence. The original sentence never says that he was "manager and executive"; he just had those "abilities".

Many mention that 'being' is an automatic disqualifier in most of the cases... In other posts a few were mentioning 'being' is not wrong in all the cases..... When can we expect the use of 'being'? Do you have any idea?

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Re: For all his managerial and executive ability , President  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Nov 2017, 13:13
Mr @mikemcgarry I'm looking for help on this question, I hope you can give me your opinion and perspective regarding the official answer and is explanation.

Allegedly the meaning of the sentence is the most important factor after: Grammar and stylistic and redundancy, but in this case, the phrase is shocking, I've never seen a phrase like this where the meaning seams flawed...
My choice was E, as changes the meaning (for the better in my opinion) and is grammatically correct.
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For all his managerial and executive ability , President  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Nov 2017, 13:53
PaterD wrote:
Mr @mikemcgarry I'm looking for help on this question, I hope you can give me your opinion and perspective regarding the official answer and is explanation.

Allegedly the meaning of the sentence is the most important factor after: Grammar and stylistic and redundancy, but in this case, the phrase is shocking, I've never seen a phrase like this where the meaning seams flawed...
My choice was E, as changes the meaning (for the better in my opinion) and is grammatically correct.




Hello PaterD,

I will be glad to help you out with this one. :-)


There is no doubt that this official sentence is pretty mind-boggling, literally. :grin:


We do not come across such sentences very often. But yes, the original sentence is absolutely grammatical.


For all his managerial and executive ability, President Hoover was often awkward and uncomfortable in his dealings with people.


Meaning Analysis]: First thing first. Let's understand the intended meaning of the sentence. The first part of the sentence says that President Hoover had managerial and executive ability. The second part of the sentence says that often, he was awkward and uncomfortable when it came to dealing with people.

So apparently, the sentence presents contrasting characteristics of President Hoover.



Error Analysis: The sentence does not use any contrasting word although it presents a contrast.

However, the phrase for all his managerial and executive ability is an expression that suggests that inherent contrast in the sentence. The phrase for all his xyz is generally followed by the information pretty contrasting in nature to what has been presented through the for phrase.

So we will hold on to this answer choice, unless we find a better choice that expresses the contrast in a better way.


Process of Elimination: So let's begin this step to see if option A really is the correct answer choice.


B) For all that he was an able manager and executive: Incorrect The phrase for all that... does not mean anything.


C) Despite him being an able manager and executive: Incorrect Use of the word despite is definitely more precise and direct to present the intended contrast. But the word being has been used incorrectly in this option.


D) Able as he was in being a manager and executive: Incorrect Same error as we saw in Choice B.


E) Even having managerial and executive abilities: Incorrect If there were Despite in place of Even, this choice would have been a contender for correct answer. The word even fails to present the contrast effectively.


Hence. Choice A indeed is the correct answer.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: For all his managerial and executive ability , President  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Nov 2017, 15:14
egmat wrote:
PaterD wrote:
Mr @mikemcgarry I'm looking for help on this question, I hope you can give me your opinion and perspective regarding the official answer and is explanation.

Allegedly the meaning of the sentence is the most important factor after: Grammar and stylistic and redundancy, but in this case, the phrase is shocking, I've never seen a phrase like this where the meaning seams flawed...
My choice was E, as changes the meaning (for the better in my opinion) and is grammatically correct.




Hello PaterD,

I will be glad to help you out with this one. :-)


There is no doubt that this official sentence is pretty mind-boggling, literally. :grin:


We do not come across such sentences very often. But yes, the original sentence is absolutely grammatical.


For all his managerial and executive ability, President Hoover was often awkward and uncomfortable in his dealings with people.


Meaning Analysis]: First thing first. Let's understand the intended meaning of the sentence. The first part of the sentence says that President Hoover had managerial and executive ability. The second part of the sentence says that often, he was awkward and uncomfortable when it came to dealing with people.

So apparently, the sentence presents contrasting characteristics of President Hoover.



Error Analysis: The sentence does not use any contrasting word although it presents a contrast.

However, the phrase for all his managerial and executive ability is an expression that suggests that inherent contrast in the sentence. The phrase for all his xyz is generally followed by the information pretty contrasting in nature to what has been presented through the for phrase.

So we will hold on to this answer choice, unless we find a better choice that expresses the contrast in a better way.


Process of Elimination: So let's begin this step to see if option A really is the correct answer choice.


B) For all that he was an able manager and executive: Incorrect The phrase for all that... does not mean anything.


C) Despite him being an able manager and executive: Incorrect Use of the word despite is definitely more precise and direct to present the intended contrast. But the word being has been used incorrectly in this option.


D) Able as he was in being a manager and executive: Incorrect Same error as we saw in Choice B.


E) Even having managerial and executive abilities: Incorrect If there were Despite in place of Even, this choice would have been a contender for correct answer. The word even fails to present the contrast effectively.


Hence. Choice A indeed is the correct answer.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha


Dear Shraddha egmat
Thanks for the answer

As you highlight there is a contrast in the the sentence but is not directly mentioned.
A - For all his managerial and executive ability, President Hoover was often awkward and uncomfortable in his dealings with people.
Because/Despite/For A then B. Awkward... but still grammatically correct. We agree.

E - Even having managerial and executive abilities, President Hoover was often awkward and uncomfortable in his dealings with people.
However/Despite/In Spite of/ Even A then B. Would not neglect the contrast but highlight it in a direct way.
http://www.wordreference.com/synonyms/even Marks it as a Synonym of Despite

In this sense, the only explanation I find, is that the idea is a paradox... So Even changes the intented meaning and so the answer is flawed.

egmat Thanks for the kind reply
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For all his managerial and executive ability , President  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Nov 2017, 15:36
PaterD wrote:

Dear Shraddha egmat
Thanks for the answer

As you highlight there is a contrast in the the sentence but is not directly mentioned.
A - For all his managerial and executive ability, President Hoover was often awkward and uncomfortable in his dealings with people.
Because/Despite/For A then B. Awkward... but still grammatically correct. We agree.

E - Even having managerial and executive abilities, President Hoover was often awkward and uncomfortable in his dealings with people.
However/Despite/In Spite of/ Even A then B. Would not neglect the contrast but highlight it in a direct way.
http://www.wordreference.com/synonyms/even Marks it as a Synonym of Despite

In this sense, the only explanation I find, is that the idea is a paradox... So Even changes the intented meaning and so the answer is flawed.

egmat Thanks for the kind reply




Hello PaterD,

IMHO, the expression even though does a better job in expressing contrast than just the word even. Even though is used quite frequently to present contrast in official sentences.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: For all his managerial and executive ability , President  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Feb 2018, 09:08
I almost never see any gmat theory ever covers such grammar point.
Lesson: each official gmat question is a gmat theory.
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Re: For all his managerial and executive ability , President &nbs [#permalink] 27 Feb 2018, 09:08
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