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For many revisionist historians, Christopher Columbus has come to

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For many revisionist historians, Christopher Columbus has come to  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Oct 2018, 21:59
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
B. devastation and enslavement in the name of progress by which native peoples of the Western Hemisphere decimated

This one just doesn’t make any sense. The native peoples were decimated; the way (B) is written, it sounds like they decimated somebody else, but we don’t know who. And that doesn’t make sense. Eliminate (B).

Consider a silly example: "After working up a huge appetite on the ski slopes, Charlie decimated the buffet." In this example, some guy named Charlie decimated ("destroyed") the buffet, presumably by eating all of it. "Charlie" is the grammatical subject for the verb "decimated" -- and the poor buffet is the thing that is decimated.

(B) is actually structured the same way: "... native peoples of the Western Hemisphere decimated." "Native peoples" is the subject, and "decimated" is the verb. The problem is, the sentence never says what, exactly, the "native peoples" decimate. There is no object for the sentence. And logically, the native peoples themselves WERE decimated. They didn't "decimate" anything.

(In in case anybody is wondering, there are apparently two different versions of this question. My explanation was originally attached to a slightly different version of the question than the one that appears at the very beginning of this thread.)

I hope this helps![/quote]



I have the same question, B has "have been" decimated. Also, more recently it has been observed that there is no preference for active over passive if the meaning of the sentence fits either choice. Can anyone please help? Why not B?
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Re: For many revisionist historians, Christopher Columbus has come to  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Nov 2018, 20:32
Hi Experts,

Could you shed some light on the usage of "peoples"? I believe people has the same plural as well as singular form.

Thanks & Regards,
Abhirup
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Thanks & Regards,
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New post Updated on: 09 Jan 2019, 08:33
Though I chose (E), I now wonder what exactly in (B) makes it an inferior choice to (E), as the question is written now? I thought it was because of the article ("the") - is this correct?

Originally posted by crazyasian1 on 07 Jan 2019, 18:55.
Last edited by crazyasian1 on 09 Jan 2019, 08:33, edited 1 time in total.
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For many revisionist historians, Christopher Columbus has come to  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jan 2019, 19:36
GMATNinja wrote:
This question is an irritating exception to the so-called “touch rule” for noun modifiers.

We also covered this example during our YouTube live chat, so if you prefer to get your SC via video, click here. And we also discussed “that” and the “touch rule” in our recent Topic of the Week on “that.”

Full disclosure: I fell asleep at the wheel and totally missed this question the first time I saw it a few years ago. So please be smarter than I was. :D

Quote:
A. devastation and enslavement in the name of progress that has decimated native peoples of the Western Hemisphere

This sounds great! “… progress that has decimated native peoples…” Yeah!

Oh, wait. That doesn’t actually make sense. It wasn’t the progress that decimated native peoples – the “devastation and enslavement in the name of progress” was the thing that decimated native peoples. Oops.

Notice that this is a plausible exception to the “touch rule”: the only things separating “that” from “devastation and enslavement” are a pair of prepositional phrases, and it would be awfully tough to separate them from “devastation and enslavement.” So sure, “that has decimated native peoples” could refer back to “devastation and enslavement.”

But there’s a new problem: “devastation and enslavement… has decimated.” Subject-verb error. Eliminate (A).

Quote:
B. devastation and enslavement in the name of progress by which native peoples of the Western Hemisphere decimated

This one just doesn’t make any sense. The native peoples were decimated; the way (B) is written, it sounds like they decimated somebody else, but we don’t know who. And that doesn’t make sense. Eliminate (B).

Quote:
C. devastating and enslaving in the name of progress those native peoples of the Western Hemisphere which in the name of progress are decimated

Lots of messy issues here. It’s not ideal to use the gerunds “devastating and enslaving” when we could use the noun forms “devastation and enslavement.” That’s not necessarily an absolute rule, but it’s one strike against (C).

(Also, “in the name of progress” is repeated… but I think that’s a GMAT Club typo, and that error doesn’t appear in the actual question. Oops.)

“Which” is a problem here, too. If the phrase beginning with “which” modifies “Western Hemisphere,” then it’s illogical; if it reaches back to “native peoples of the Western Hemisphere”, then it’s still wrong, because “which” can’t modify people – only things. (C) is gone.

Quote:
D. devastating and enslaving those native peoples of the western Hemisphere which in the name of progress are decimated.

Basically, all of the errors in (C) are repeated in (D). So (D) is out, too.

Quote:
E. the devastation and enslavement in the name of progress that have decimated the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere.

Almost everything we said about (A) applies here too: this looks like a classic exception to the “touch rule.”

The only difference? “Has” in (A) has been changed to “have” in (E). “Devastation and enslavement… have decimated the native peoples.”

So (E) is the best answer, even if you think (A) might sound better. :)

And if anybody is still curious about the article "the" at the beginning of (E): I don't think it's a big deal, but adding "the" helps clarify that Columbus personifies the specific devastation and enslavement that decimated the native peoples, rather than devastation and enslavement in general. But again: that's not a major issue, and not something that should worry you too much.



Here we are not following touch rule,could you please provide some examples from OG ,where gmat has not followed touch rule?
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Re: For many revisionist historians, Christopher Columbus has come to  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jan 2019, 23:46
E is the correct answer because of the correct usage of parallel the parallel elements . Also plural have is correctly used.
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Re: For many revisionist historians, Christopher Columbus has come to &nbs [#permalink] 07 Jan 2019, 23:46

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