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GMAT Tip of the Week: More TOP 20 Tips...

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GMAT Tip of the Week: More TOP 20 Tips...  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2018, 06:19
GMAT Tip of the Week: More TOP 20 Tips...

This topic is a part of the GMAT Club Tip of the Week Series



YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-53Nw6kvnY



    41. Almost all absolute value questions require logic. The logic is one of the two: One - an absolute number is never negative. It is either positive or zero. Don’t forget zero - it is neither positive nor negative. And Two - absolute value is the distance of a number from zero.
    42. When should you simplify absolute value questions? The only absolute value questions that should be solved with the Precise tool of simplification are equations. In this case, we’ll use the expression in the absolute value bars in two forms: once as a positive and then as a negative. Note that these questions usually have an easier Logical or Alternative solution.
    43. All Reading Comprehension passages tell the same 3-part story ‘Once there was something, then something happened, and now there is something else’. Once women in America didn’t have the right to vote, then came the Suffragettes, and now they do. If you want to answer questions that deal with the entire passage, first make sure that you have all three parts of the story.
    44. In Critical Reasoning, there are three ways to weaken an argument Providing an alternative explanation; showing that a similar incidence led to different results; or providing evidence that the experiment isn’t reliable - that it wasn’t done the right way.
    45. In Critical Reasoning, there are three ways to strengthen an argument These three ways are the opposite of how we would weaken an argument: Instead of providing an alternative explanation - ruling out an alternative explanation; Instead of showing that a similar incidence led to different results, providing a similar incidence with similar results; and instead of showing that the experiment isn’t reliable - providing evidence we were not previously aware of, which tells us that we can trust the experiment.
    46. Critical Reasoning: ‘The “Although” Argument’. The most confusing way to strengthen an argument is what we’ll call ‘The “Although” Argument’. Say I want to prove that I’m a faster runner that you are, so I let you start running one minute before me. Now, if I won the race, does the fact that you started running a minute before me strengthen or weaken my argument? Strengthen: if, although you started running before me, I still came first, it only strengthens the claim that I’m a faster runner. The fact that we got the same result although there was something that made it less likely, only strengthens the conclusion.
    47. When a question relates to a volume of a prism or a cylinder, we don’t always need a formula. If we’re given the AREA of the base or asked what it is, all there is to remember is that the volume is the area of the base times the height of the prism or the cylinder.
    48. The logic behind circles The logic behind circles is that the closer we are to the middle of the circle, the larger things are. For example, the largest chord is the diameter. Another example: the area closer to the center here is larger.
    49. The one rule that can save you a lot of time in Data Sufficiency questions When there are more variables than equations, there’s an infinite number of possible solutions. If we have, for example, two equations with three variables, that’s not enough information to solve the question. If we have the same number of equations and variables (or even more variables) - a solution is definitely possible and the data is sufficient! For example, a Data Sufficiency question about the volume of a rectangular prism can be represented by one equation with four variables: length, width, height and volume. We have to know three in order to get the fourth.
    50. Parallelism is one of the main tools in Sentence Correction. If different parts of the sentence have the same function, they must have the same form. Usually, it is the same verb form that we’ll be looking for.
    51. Sentence Correction: look for the subject. Sentence Correction questions can sometimes be very confusing just because the subject of the sentence is pushed to the end. ‘Being elected president in 1884 and losing his re-election in 1888, only to return to winning the election again in 1892, Grover Cleveland is the only of his kind to be re-elected for non-consecutive terms.’ The easiest way to understand the sentence is to rephrase it, starting with the subject: “"Grover Cleveland, who was elected president in 1884…”
    52. How should you improve a previous GMAT score? First, don’t assume that you remember anything - go over everything from scratch. The stuff that you remember won’t take much of your time - but it is what you forgot that you must give special attention to. Second, research your past mistakes and find NEW, DIFFERENT ways to solve them. Try 5 different ways to solve a question before you decide what is the one that is best to you - don’t just do what you used to do. You know what they say, if you keep doing what you did, you'll keep getting what you got. Do better, you’ll get better.
    53. What should you eat during your preparation period? Well, let’s start with what not to eat - heavy meals, snacks, chocolate bars, smoothies… You get it. A balanced diet with several smaller meals a day is great - no low carb diets as well! You’ll also need some oily fish in your diet, such as Salmon or Sardines, for their Omega 3, which will help you think faster. Flaxseeds are a great source for vegetarians. You’ll also need lots of vitamin K to assist your brain in creating new pathways. Dark leafy greens such as Broccoli and Kale, are a great source for vitamin K, and will also provide B6 and B12 needed for better concentration and memory. And last - you don’t have to give up your caffeine - but green tea might be a better source than coffee, with some extra antioxidants to support concentration.
    54. What should you eat in the morning of the real test? Plain breakfast, light but satisfying. The complex carbohydrates in whole-wheat bread will keep you alert for long periods of time. If you are used to having coffee or tea - drink them - but try to refrain from sugar, and don’t drink more than one cup. You don’t want to have to go to the restroom too often.
    55. How should you make the most out of mock tests? First, prepare for them: go over your past mistakes, improve your knowledge, technique and strategy. Second, come with a plan. What are the things that you’re going to do better than the last time? Third, if possible - follow the routine you’re going to have in the real test - waking up, having breakfast, and taking the mock at the same time of the real test. Prevent any distractions. And - most importantly - research your mock test when you’re done and… prepare for the next one…
    56. How can you complete the Quant section on time? Since this section is adaptive, questions should become harder and harder the better you do. This means that in order to be able to maintain an average time of 2 minutes per question, the first questions should take you far less than two minutes in order to allow two, three or even four minutes for the harder ones. This means that what we must prepare for is finding the FASTEST way to solve each question, even if we cannot always tell why it works. Tools such as estimation, symmetry, plugging in numbers, using the answers and others are all ways to reduce a lot of time - when used correctly. And, most importantly, where logic can be applied, it is usually the fastest way to solve the question.
    57. How can you complete Integrated Reasoning on time? For most people, the answer is to skip some of the questions. If it takes you too much time to read and understand the given data or graphs - simply choose your battles: give up on some questions in order to gain the others. But don’t spend time reading the questions before trying to solve them. Decide before the real test which questions formats to go for.
    58. How can you complete Analytical Writing Assessment on time? Be very strict: 5 minutes for analyzing the given issue, 20 minutes for writing, and another 5 minutes for going over and refining it.
    59. How many times should I take the test before I get my highest possible score? You should only take the GMAT once, but do it right. Allow enough time for preparation. Register for the test before you start, it will make you more engaged. Don’t skip any task or any topic. Take notes. Allow enough time for memorization. Research your mistakes. Practice the lessons you’ve learned from that research. Take the test at your peak performance. Be so good it will make no sense to repeat it.
    60. Using the Integrated Reasoning calculator On one hand - the calculator should rarely be used. On the other hand, since you have a calculator, don’t forget to use it. Some Integrated Reasoning questions require very hard calculations that do require using a calculator.


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Re: GMAT Tip of the Week: More TOP 20 Tips...  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2018, 06:47
That's great...However could you please merge this with previous 40 tips... thanks

souvik101990 wrote:
GMAT Tip of the Week: More TOP 20 Tips...

This topic is a part of the GMAT Club Tip of the Week Series



YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-53Nw6kvnY



    41. Almost all absolute value questions require logic. The logic is one of the two: One - an absolute number is never negative. It is either positive or zero. Don’t forget zero - it is neither positive nor negative. And Two - absolute value is the distance of a number from zero.
    42. When should you simplify absolute value questions? The only absolute value questions that should be solved with the Precise tool of simplification are equations. In this case, we’ll use the expression in the absolute value bars in two forms: once as a positive and then as a negative. Note that these questions usually have an easier Logical or Alternative solution.
    43. All Reading Comprehension passages tell the same 3-part story ‘Once there was something, then something happened, and now there is something else’. Once women in America didn’t have the right to vote, then came the Suffragettes, and now they do. If you want to answer questions that deal with the entire passage, first make sure that you have all three parts of the story.
    44. In Critical Reasoning, there are three ways to weaken an argument Providing an alternative explanation; showing that a similar incidence led to different results; or providing evidence that the experiment isn’t reliable - that it wasn’t done the right way.
    45. In Critical Reasoning, there are three ways to strengthen an argument These three ways are the opposite of how we would weaken an argument: Instead of providing an alternative explanation - ruling out an alternative explanation; Instead of showing that a similar incidence led to different results, providing a similar incidence with similar results; and instead of showing that the experiment isn’t reliable - providing evidence we were not previously aware of, which tells us that we can trust the experiment.
    46. Critical Reasoning: ‘The “Although” Argument’. The most confusing way to strengthen an argument is what we’ll call ‘The “Although” Argument’. Say I want to prove that I’m a faster runner that you are, so I let you start running one minute before me. Now, if I won the race, does the fact that you started running a minute before me strengthen or weaken my argument? Strengthen: if, although you started running before me, I still came first, it only strengthens the claim that I’m a faster runner. The fact that we got the same result although there was something that made it less likely, only strengthens the conclusion.
    47. When a question relates to a volume of a prism or a cylinder, we don’t always need a formula. If we’re given the AREA of the base or asked what it is, all there is to remember is that the volume is the area of the base times the height of the prism or the cylinder.
    48. The logic behind circles The logic behind circles is that the closer we are to the middle of the circle, the larger things are. For example, the largest chord is the diameter. Another example: the area closer to the center here is larger.
    49. The one rule that can save you a lot of time in Data Sufficiency questions When there are more variables than equations, there’s an infinite number of possible solutions. If we have, for example, two equations with three variables, that’s not enough information to solve the question. If we have the same number of equations and variables (or even more variables) - a solution is definitely possible and the data is sufficient! For example, a Data Sufficiency question about the volume of a rectangular prism can be represented by one equation with four variables: length, width, height and volume. We have to know three in order to get the fourth.
    50. Parallelism is one of the main tools in Sentence Correction. If different parts of the sentence have the same function, they must have the same form. Usually, it is the same verb form that we’ll be looking for.
    51. Sentence Correction: look for the subject. Sentence Correction questions can sometimes be very confusing just because the subject of the sentence is pushed to the end. ‘Being elected president in 1884 and losing his re-election in 1888, only to return to winning the election again in 1892, Grover Cleveland is the only of his kind to be re-elected for non-consecutive terms.’ The easiest way to understand the sentence is to rephrase it, starting with the subject: “"Grover Cleveland, who was elected president in 1884…”
    52. How should you improve a previous GMAT score? First, don’t assume that you remember anything - go over everything from scratch. The stuff that you remember won’t take much of your time - but it is what you forgot that you must give special attention to. Second, research your past mistakes and find NEW, DIFFERENT ways to solve them. Try 5 different ways to solve a question before you decide what is the one that is best to you - don’t just do what you used to do. You know what they say, if you keep doing what you did, you'll keep getting what you got. Do better, you’ll get better.
    53. What should you eat during your preparation period? Well, let’s start with what not to eat - heavy meals, snacks, chocolate bars, smoothies… You get it. A balanced diet with several smaller meals a day is great - no low carb diets as well! You’ll also need some oily fish in your diet, such as Salmon or Sardines, for their Omega 3, which will help you think faster. Flaxseeds are a great source for vegetarians. You’ll also need lots of vitamin K to assist your brain in creating new pathways. Dark leafy greens such as Broccoli and Kale, are a great source for vitamin K, and will also provide B6 and B12 needed for better concentration and memory. And last - you don’t have to give up your caffeine - but green tea might be a better source than coffee, with some extra antioxidants to support concentration.
    54. What should you eat in the morning of the real test? Plain breakfast, light but satisfying. The complex carbohydrates in whole-wheat bread will keep you alert for long periods of time. If you are used to having coffee or tea - drink them - but try to refrain from sugar, and don’t drink more than one cup. You don’t want to have to go to the restroom too often.
    55. How should you make the most out of mock tests? First, prepare for them: go over your past mistakes, improve your knowledge, technique and strategy. Second, come with a plan. What are the things that you’re going to do better than the last time? Third, if possible - follow the routine you’re going to have in the real test - waking up, having breakfast, and taking the mock at the same time of the real test. Prevent any distractions. And - most importantly - research your mock test when you’re done and… prepare for the next one…
    56. How can you complete the Quant section on time? Since this section is adaptive, questions should become harder and harder the better you do. This means that in order to be able to maintain an average time of 2 minutes per question, the first questions should take you far less than two minutes in order to allow two, three or even four minutes for the harder ones. This means that what we must prepare for is finding the FASTEST way to solve each question, even if we cannot always tell why it works. Tools such as estimation, symmetry, plugging in numbers, using the answers and others are all ways to reduce a lot of time - when used correctly. And, most importantly, where logic can be applied, it is usually the fastest way to solve the question.
    57. How can you complete Integrated Reasoning on time? For most people, the answer is to skip some of the questions. If it takes you too much time to read and understand the given data or graphs - simply choose your battles: give up on some questions in order to gain the others. But don’t spend time reading the questions before trying to solve them. Decide before the real test which questions formats to go for.
    58. How can you complete Analytical Writing Assessment on time? Be very strict: 5 minutes for analyzing the given issue, 20 minutes for writing, and another 5 minutes for going over and refining it.
    59. How many times should I take the test before I get my highest possible score? You should only take the GMAT once, but do it right. Allow enough time for preparation. Register for the test before you start, it will make you more engaged. Don’t skip any task or any topic. Take notes. Allow enough time for memorization. Research your mistakes. Practice the lessons you’ve learned from that research. Take the test at your peak performance. Be so good it will make no sense to repeat it.
    60. Using the Integrated Reasoning calculator On one hand - the calculator should rarely be used. On the other hand, since you have a calculator, don’t forget to use it. Some Integrated Reasoning questions require very hard calculations that do require using a calculator.

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Re: GMAT Tip of the Week: More TOP 20 Tips...   [#permalink] 16 Oct 2018, 06:47
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