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Conclusions from GMAT algorithm study based on ESR analyses

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Joined: 09 Mar 2017
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Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 23

Re: Conclusions from GMAT algorithm study based on ESR analyses [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2017, 08:56
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HiLine wrote:
Thanks to GMAT Club members sharing their ESR's, especially in this thread: http://gmatclub.com/forum/information-o ... 21111.html, I now have access to about 40 ESR's. While more reports are definitely needed to help draw robust conclusions, here are a few things that I have noticed and are quite confident about.

1. The distribution of questions by quarter:



-Verbal: 10 (2 exp) - 10 (3 exp) - 10 (3 exp) - 11 (3 exp); 41 questions including 11 experimental
-Quant: 9 (2 exp) - 9 (2 exp) - 9 (2 exp) - 10 (3 exp); 37 questions including 9 experimental

You see, there are A LOT of experimental questions in each section.

2. Sectional weighting



Whether the first 10 questions are more heavily weighted than others has been a subject of debate in our community for a while. I have dug through a lot of the ESR's I have my hands on to draw this important conclusion:

There is no evidence that the first 10 questions are more heavily weighted than the rest of the section. In fact, I think we have nearly sufficient evidence to conclude the opposite: that the first 10 questions are not more heavily weighted.

I have a few reports where the test taker gets several questions wrong in the first quarter but destroys the rest of the section and ends up at the same place as another test taker who scores perfectly in the first quarter but gets more questions wrong later on. It is rare for someone to not do so hot in the first part of the section but then improve significantly in the remainder of the section when the questions tend to get progressively harder if he is doing well. However, it is very common for the opposite scenario to occur. Quite understandably, the more questions you answer correctly, the more difficult the questions tend to get and thus the easier it is to answer subsequent questions incorrectly.

But the bottom line is, don't try too hard in the first quarter at the expense of the rest of the section.

3. Sectional difficulty



This is the conclusion that puzzled me the most:

Sometimes, when you're doing too well, e.g. answering all questions correctly, the difficulty of questions drops.

When you face less difficult questions, each question you answer wrong tends to get more heavily penalized. Perhaps the GMAC wants to make sure you've got all your bases covered so you don't answer hard questions right but easy questions wrong?

4. Sub-sectional scaled score and percentile



Not sure how to post a scaled score vs percentile table without making it look messy, so I'm probably not going to post all percentiles; rather, I'm going to share a few observations I consider interesting:

- Sentence Correction is the hardest sub-section to score perfectly on. A 51 on SC warrants a 99th percentile, whereas the same feat in CR bears a 98th percentile rank, and that in RC would give you a mere 95th percentile.
- Reading Comprehension is the hardest sub-section to score 40+ on. In my sample, there are a few 51's but nothing between 42 and 50.


I apologize for the messy formatting job; this post is a very rough draft and will be continually updated as I have more time for analyses and reformat and as more ESR's become available. If someone that's skilled in formatting can jump in to help with making the content visually appealing, that would save me some time and effort to concentrate on other pieces. :wink:

We need more input. Your contribution to this thread will be super helpful: http://gmatclub.com/forum/information-o ... 21111.html


Thank you for the analysis. Could you clarify how you know the subsection scores? I see percentiles, but not the scores themselves. E.g it'l say you got a 93% in RC, but not a corresponding 40/41 (or whatever number).

Do you know what percentiles correspond to each score? Thanks.

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 23

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Re: Conclusions from GMAT algorithm study based on ESR analyses [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2017, 07:56
bump. Does anyone know the subsection scores for verbal and how they correspond to verbal?

E.g. 51 on RC is a 95%.

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 23

Re: Conclusions from GMAT algorithm study based on ESR analyses   [#permalink] 29 Oct 2017, 07:56

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Conclusions from GMAT algorithm study based on ESR analyses

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