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hopefully

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Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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hopefully  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2013, 15:52
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fameatop wrote:
I want to when is it correct or incorrect to use "Hopefully" and in which ways the adverb "Hopefully" is tested on GMAT.
I have attached below few examples & want to want why a particular option is correct or incorrect.

They listened hopefully for the sound of the rescue party.
Hopefully, they will come in time.
I hope they will come in time.

Fame,
The adverb "hopefully" means "with hope, with a quality of hope."

Your first sentence is an extremely rare example of a 100% correct use of the word "hopefully":
They listened hopefully for the sound of the rescue party.
In other words, they listened with a sense of hope --- that's actually what the word means.

The second sentence is a classic example of the common misuse of the word
Hopefully, they will come in time. :-(
In almost all uses in colloquial speech, folks misuse "hopefully" as a substitute for "I hope that ..." This is grammatically and logically incorrect. What folks are trying to say is something along the lines of your third sentence, "I hope they will come in time," which is perfectly correct.

In a way, you could say that the word "hopefully" is a sort of abbreviation for a short phrase --- "I hopefully say that they will come in time" --- but of course, that's over-the-top stilted, so no one would say that anymore.

The GMAT does not test this issue. I would just caution about the larger context. Of course, the reason the GMAT tests SC is because, in the business world, good writing conveys, "I'm intelligent; I'm competent; you can trust me", whereas poor grammar conveys, "I'm not bright; if you give me money, I may do stupid things with it." In this regard, I would recommend avoiding the word "hopefully" in all your writing, unless you have a rare occasion to use it in a correct context, as in your first sentence.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


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Re: hopefully  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2019, 22:11
mikemcgarry wrote:
fameatop wrote:
I want to when is it correct or incorrect to use "Hopefully" and in which ways the adverb "Hopefully" is tested on GMAT.
I have attached below few examples & want to want why a particular option is correct or incorrect.

They listened hopefully for the sound of the rescue party.
Hopefully, they will come in time.
I hope they will come in time.

Fame,
The adverb "hopefully" means "with hope, with a quality of hope."

Your first sentence is an extremely rare example of a 100% correct use of the word "hopefully":
They listened hopefully for the sound of the rescue party.
In other words, they listened with a sense of hope --- that's actually what the word means.

The second sentence is a classic example of the common misuse of the word
Hopefully, they will come in time. :-(
In almost all uses in colloquial speech, folks misuse "hopefully" as a substitute for "I hope that ..." This is grammatically and logically incorrect. What folks are trying to say is something along the lines of your third sentence, "I hope they will come in time," which is perfectly correct.

In a way, you could say that the word "hopefully" is a sort of abbreviation for a short phrase --- "I hopefully say that they will come in time" --- but of course, that's over-the-top stilted, so no one would say that anymore.

The GMAT does not test this issue. I would just caution about the larger context. Of course, the reason the GMAT tests SC is because, in the business world, good writing conveys, "I'm intelligent; I'm competent; you can trust me", whereas poor grammar conveys, "I'm not bright; if you give me money, I may do stupid things with it." In this regard, I would recommend avoiding the word "hopefully" in all your writing, unless you have a rare occasion to use it in a correct context, as in your first sentence.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi Mike,

Are there other such examples of weird/ illogical adverbs, similar to "hopefully", which i need to be aware of on gmat ? Please guide further reading if required.

Thanks,
Azhar
GMAT Club Bot
Re: hopefully   [#permalink] 24 Sep 2019, 22:11
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