It is currently 18 Jan 2018, 12:04

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 14

Kudos [?]: 30 [1], given: 2

Location: United States
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3
WE: Corporate Finance (Investment Banking)
Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jan 2014, 18:20
1
This post received
KUDOS
12
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

59% (01:16) correct 41% (01:20) wrong based on 297 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

(1) y^3 is a multiple of 48
(2) y^2 is a multiple of 30
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Kudos [?]: 30 [1], given: 2

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Status: Student
Joined: 26 Aug 2013
Posts: 250

Kudos [?]: 69 [0], given: 401

Location: France
Concentration: Finance, General Management
Schools: EMLYON FT'16
GMAT 1: 650 Q47 V32
GPA: 3.44
Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Jan 2014, 03:09
Ans A

Y^3=Y(Y²)=12(3K) K is a positive factor

Therefore Y is divided by 12.

Hope it helps
_________________

Think outside the box

Kudos [?]: 69 [0], given: 401

3 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 20 Dec 2013
Posts: 130

Kudos [?]: 116 [3], given: 1

Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Jan 2014, 04:46
3
This post received
KUDOS
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
GMATBeast wrote:
Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

(1) y^3 is a multiple of 48
(2) y^2 is a multiple of 30


Statement I is sufficient:

y^3 = (2^4)(3)(k)

Since y is an integer minimum value of k will be 2^2 x 3^2 hence minimum value of y will be cube root of it which is 2^3(3) = 24 hence it is definitely a multiple of 12

Statement II is insufficient
y^2 = 5 x 3 x 2k

Since y is an integer the minimum value of k is 5 x 3 x 2 hence minimum value for y is 30 which is not a multiple of 12

It can also hold a value which is a multiple of 12 as well since k can further increase to be any square of an integer.

Hence the answer is A
_________________

76000 Subscribers, 7 million minutes of learning delivered and 5.6 million video views

Perfect Scores
http://perfectscores.org
http://www.youtube.com/perfectscores

Kudos [?]: 116 [3], given: 1

1 KUDOS received
Current Student
avatar
S
Joined: 20 Mar 2014
Posts: 2685

Kudos [?]: 1846 [1], given: 800

Concentration: Finance, Strategy
Schools: Kellogg '18 (M)
GMAT 1: 750 Q49 V44
GPA: 3.7
WE: Engineering (Aerospace and Defense)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jul 2015, 06:45
1
This post received
KUDOS
GMATBeast wrote:
Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

(1) y^3 is a multiple of 48
(2) y^2 is a multiple of 30


Per statement 1, \(y^3 = 48p\), p>0 integer ----> as y is an integer, \(p = 2^2*3^3*q^3\). Thus y=12q ----> This statement is sufficient.

Per statement 2, \(y^2 = 30p\), p>0 integer ----> as y is an integer, \(p = 2^2*3^2*5^2*q^3\). Thus y=30q ----> Thus y = 30, 60, 90, \(120\)... Thus this statement is not sufficient.

A is the correct answer.

Kudos [?]: 1846 [1], given: 800

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 19 Jun 2010
Posts: 49

Kudos [?]: 14 [0], given: 17

Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Oct 2015, 14:40
Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

(1) y3 is a multiple of 48.

(2) y2 is a multiple of 30.

---------------------------
Its from a Kaplan CAT I just took, below is kaplans explanation.
I just cant understand how the get "So we know that y3 has at least four 2’s and at least one three among its prime factors" Can someone also point to a good source so I can get around this topic? I understand the basic primes and multiples properties but the exponent really toughed up the problem for me.
thanks.


Analyze the Question Stem:

If y were a multiple of 12, would have to equal an integer. That means that all the factors in 12 could be cancelled out by factors in y.

In other words asking whether y is a multiple of 12 is the same ask asking whether y has at least 22 and 31 as prime factors.

Since this is a Yes/No question, we need to know whether y definitely does or definitely does not have those factors.

Evaluate the Statements:

Statement (1): For y3 to be a multiple of 48, it must be that yields an integer. Let’s find the prime factors of 48.

48 = 8 × 6

48 = 23× 2 × 3

48 = 24 x 3

So we know that y3 has at least four 2’s and at least one three among its prime factors.

So our answer is definitely "yes," and Statement (1) is Sufficient. Eliminate choices (B), (C), and (E).

Statement (2): For y2 to be a multiple of 30, it must be that yields an integer. Again, let’s go through prime factorization.

30 = 6 × 5

30 = 2 × 3 × 5

So, y2 has at least one factor of 2, at least one factor of 3, and at least one factor of 5.

Just as y3 had to have all of its factors in groups of threes, y2 must have its factors in groups of twos. So we can deduce that y2 has at least two factors of 2, at least two factors of 3, and at least two factors of 5.

y will have the same factors as y2 has, but half as many of each. So, y must have at least one factor of 2, at least one factor of 3, and at least one factor of 5.

So, y definitely has one factor of 3. But it might have only one factor of 2, or it might have two factors of 2.

Statement (2) is Insufficient. Eliminate choice (D). Answer Choice (A) is correct.

Combined: Unnecessary

Kudos [?]: 14 [0], given: 17

4 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 01 Jan 2015
Posts: 63

Kudos [?]: 105 [4], given: 14

Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Oct 2015, 18:35
4
This post received
KUDOS
4
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Quote:
Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

(1) \(y^3\) is a multiple of 48.

(2) \(y^2\) is a multiple of 30.



(Statement 1) \(y^3 = 48*q\), where q is an integer greater than or equal to 0. --> \(y^3 = 2^4*3*q.\) Given that y is an integer, a value of q should be chosen such that all the exponents of the right hand side are multiples of 3 and it should be the smallest value that accomplishes this, so that if you were to take the cubic root of \(y^3\), you will be left with an integer. So \(q = 2^2*3^2*n^3\), where n is an integer greater than or equal to 0.

Now you have \(y^3 = 2^6*3^3*n^3\). To solve for y, take the cubic root of \(y^3\) --> y = \(2^2*3*n\) Therefore y is a multiple of 12. Statement 1 is sufficient


(Statement 2) \(y^2 = 30*q\), where q is an integer greater than or equal to 0. --> \(y^2 = 2*3*5*q.\) Given that y is an integer, a value of q should be chosen such that all the exponents of the right hand side are multiples of 2 and it should be the smallest value that accomplishes this, so that if you were to take the square root of \(y^2\), you will be left with an integer. So \(q = 2*3*5*n^2\), where n is an integer greater than or equal to 0.

Now you have \(y^2 = 2^2*3^2*5^2*n^2\). To solve for y, take the square root of \(y^2\) --> y = \(2*3*5*n\) Therefore y is a multiple of 30. A multiple of 12 requires at least two 2's and one 3 at all times, but a multiple of 30 won't always have at least two 2's.

Don't analyze statement 1 and statement 2 the way I did, unless you are given that something is an integer. For example if y wasn't an integer, then statement 1 would have been insufficient because y could take the value \(y = 48^\frac{1}{3}\)

Kudos [?]: 105 [4], given: 14

Expert Post
2 KUDOS received
Math Revolution GMAT Instructor
User avatar
D
Joined: 16 Aug 2015
Posts: 4683

Kudos [?]: 3313 [2], given: 0

GPA: 3.82
Premium Member
Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Oct 2015, 21:22
2
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
Forget conventional ways of solving math questions. In DS, Variable approach is the easiest and quickest way to find the answer without actually solving the problem. Remember equal number of variables and independent equations ensures a solution.

Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

(1) y^3 is a multiple of 48
(2) y^2 is a multiple of 30

If we modify the original condition and the question, we ultimately want to know whether y=12int=(2^2)3int. It is important here that y is a positive integer. There is only 1 variable (y), so in order to match the number of variables and that of equations, we need one equation, but since 2 are given from the 2 conditions, there is high chance (D) will be our answer.
From condition 1, y^3=48n(n is an integer)= (2^3)(2)(3)n, and y becomes cube root[(2^3)(2)(3)n]=2cube root(6n). As y is told to be a positive integer, the cube root should be eliminated. Then, from y=2cube root(6n)=2cube root(6*6^2m^3)where m is some integer, the answer to the question becomes 'yes' from y=2*6*m=12m, so this condition is sufficient.
But from condition 2, we can see that the answer becomes 'no' when y=30^2, whereas it is 'yes' for y=(30^2)(2^2). This condition is insufficient, and the answer therefore becomes (A).

For cases where we need 1 more equation, such as original conditions with “1 variable”, or “2 variables and 1 equation”, or “3 variables and 2 equations”, we have 1 equation each in both 1) and 2). Therefore, there is 59 % chance that D is the answer, while A or B has 38% chance and C or E has 3% chance. Since D is most likely to be the answer using 1) and 2) separately according to DS definition. Obviously there may be cases where the answer is A, B, C or E.
_________________

MathRevolution: Finish GMAT Quant Section with 10 minutes to spare
The one-and-only World’s First Variable Approach for DS and IVY Approach for PS with ease, speed and accuracy.
Find a 10% off coupon code for GMAT Club members.
“Receive 5 Math Questions & Solutions Daily”
Unlimited Access to over 120 free video lessons - try it yourself
See our Youtube demo

Kudos [?]: 3313 [2], given: 0

Intern
Intern
User avatar
Status: My heart can feel, my brain can grasp, I'm indomitable.
Affiliations: Educator
Joined: 16 Oct 2012
Posts: 39

Kudos [?]: 20 [0], given: 51

Location: Bangladesh
WE: Social Work (Education)
Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Oct 2015, 23:08
1)..y^3=48k=2.2.2.2.3…=2^3.2^3.3^… y=12k …suff

2)y^2=30k=2.3.5…=4.9.25k not necessarily 12k.. inssuff
Ans: A
_________________

please press "+1 Kudos" if useful

Kudos [?]: 20 [0], given: 51

2 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 18 Sep 2014
Posts: 1199

Kudos [?]: 928 [2], given: 75

Location: India
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Nov 2015, 22:18
2
This post received
KUDOS
Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

(1) \(y^3\) is a multiple of 48
(2) \(y^2\) is a multiple of 30

we want to know whether \(y=12x\) where x is an integer.

From condition 1, \(y^3\)=48a (a is an integer)

Therefore \(y= \sqrt[3]{48a}\)

=\(y= \sqrt[3]{8*6*a}\)=\(\sqrt[3]{(2^3)*6*a}\)=\(2*\sqrt[3]{6*a}\)

As y is told to be a positive integer, the cube root should be eliminated. Therefore a needs to have a value of \(6*(b^2)\) where b is an integer.

hence \(y=2*6*m=12m\) thereby provides us the required answer. So B/E/C are ruled out. we have to evaluate statement 2 for D.

From condition 2, \(y^2=30p\) (p is an integer)

so \(y=\sqrt{30p}=\sqrt{2*3*5*p}\)

As y is told to be a positive integer, the square root should be eliminated.

Therefore p needs to have a value of \(2*3*5*(q^2)\) where b is an integer.

hence \(y=2*3*5*q=30q\)

This condition is insufficient, and the answer therefore becomes (A) ruling out D.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
I took 115s for the same in exam and still got this question wrong.(First qn) :wink:

_________________

The only time you can lose is when you give up. Try hard and you will suceed.
Thanks = Kudos. Kudos are appreciated

http://gmatclub.com/forum/rules-for-posting-in-verbal-gmat-forum-134642.html
When you post a question Pls. Provide its source & TAG your questions
Avoid posting from unreliable sources.


My posts
http://gmatclub.com/forum/beauty-of-coordinate-geometry-213760.html#p1649924
http://gmatclub.com/forum/calling-all-march-april-gmat-takers-who-want-to-cross-213154.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/possessive-pronouns-200496.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/double-negatives-206717.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/the-greatest-integer-function-223595.html#p1721773
https://gmatclub.com/forum/improve-reading-habit-233410.html#p1802265

Kudos [?]: 928 [2], given: 75

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Math Revolution GMAT Instructor
User avatar
D
Joined: 16 Aug 2015
Posts: 4683

Kudos [?]: 3313 [1], given: 0

GPA: 3.82
Premium Member
Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Nov 2015, 01:32
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
Forget conventional ways of solving math questions. In DS, Variable approach is the easiest and quickest way to find the answer without actually solving the problem. Remember equal number of variables and independent equations ensures a solution.

Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

(1) y^3 is a multiple of 48
(2) y^2 is a multiple of 30

There is one variable (y) and 2 equations are given by the 2 conditions, so there is high chance (D) will be our answer.
For condition 1, y^3=48t(t=positive integer), y=cube root (48t)=cube root (2^3*6t)=12s, where s is a positive integer. This is a 'yes' and the condition is sufficient.
For condition 2, it is a 'yes' for y=60, but 'no' for y=30, so the answer becomes (A).
This is a recent type of question.

For cases where we need 1 more equation, such as original conditions with “1 variable”, or “2 variables and 1 equation”, or “3 variables and 2 equations”, we have 1 equation each in both 1) and 2). Therefore, there is 59 % chance that D is the answer, while A or B has 38% chance and C or E has 3% chance. Since D is most likely to be the answer using 1) and 2) separately according to DS definition. Obviously there may be cases where the answer is A, B, C or E.
_________________

MathRevolution: Finish GMAT Quant Section with 10 minutes to spare
The one-and-only World’s First Variable Approach for DS and IVY Approach for PS with ease, speed and accuracy.
Find a 10% off coupon code for GMAT Club members.
“Receive 5 Math Questions & Solutions Daily”
Unlimited Access to over 120 free video lessons - try it yourself
See our Youtube demo

Kudos [?]: 3313 [1], given: 0

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 28 Aug 2016
Posts: 20

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 1

Schools: Bocconi '21
Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Sep 2016, 11:47
To be honest I really do not understand it completely. Can someone answer me the following question concerning statement 1:

If y^3 is a multiple of 48*t (t some integer). Then the prime factorization gives: (2^4*3) * t. Sooo how is that exactly sufficient? I mean it is for y^3 and not for y right? Isn't it possible that if you take the cube root of y^3 the outcome is different then with y^3?

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 1

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Status: In the realms of Chaos & Night
Joined: 13 Sep 2015
Posts: 171

Kudos [?]: 106 [0], given: 95

Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Nov 2016, 09:43
GMATBeast wrote:
Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

(1) y^3 is a multiple of 48
(2) y^2 is a multiple of 30


Statement (1) -
Factors of 48 = 2*2*2*2*3
=> \(y^3\)= \(2^3\)*2*3*k ----- (\(y^3\) is a multiple of 48 and k is the quotient when \(\frac{y^3}{48}\))
Hence = \(2^2*3^2\) to complete the statement.
Question - why can't k be = \(2^2*3^2*x^2\) (where x is any integer)


Statement (2) -
Factors of 30 = 2*3*5
=> \(y^2\) = 2*3*5*p ----- (\(y^2\) is a multiple of 30 and p is the quotient when \(\frac{y^2}{30}\))
Hence can be p = 2*3*5*\(x^2\) to make the statement sufficient.

I understand that i am adding an extra prime factor of x in Statement - (1) & (2) - I am missing some simple logic.
Bunuel - kindly review and clarify.
_________________

Good luck
=========================================================================================
"If a street performer makes you stop walking, you owe him a buck"
"If this post helps you on your GMAT journey, drop a +1 Kudo "


"Thursdays with Ron - Consolidated Verbal Master List - Updated"

Kudos [?]: 106 [0], given: 95

Expert Post
3 KUDOS received
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 43323

Kudos [?]: 139428 [3], given: 12790

Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Nov 2016, 22:34
3
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
4
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Nightfury14 wrote:
GMATBeast wrote:
Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

(1) y^3 is a multiple of 48
(2) y^2 is a multiple of 30


Statement (1) -
Factors of 48 = 2*2*2*2*3
=> \(y^3\)= \(2^3\)*2*3*k ----- (\(y^3\) is a multiple of 48 and k is the quotient when \(\frac{y^3}{48}\))
Hence = \(2^2*3^2\) to complete the statement.
Question - why can't k be = \(2^2*3^2*x^2\) (where x is any integer)


Statement (2) -
Factors of 30 = 2*3*5
=> \(y^2\) = 2*3*5*p ----- (\(y^2\) is a multiple of 30 and p is the quotient when \(\frac{y^2}{30}\))
Hence can be p = 2*3*5*\(x^2\) to make the statement sufficient.

I understand that i am adding an extra prime factor of x in Statement - (1) & (2) - I am missing some simple logic.
Bunuel - kindly review and clarify.


Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

(1) y^3 is a multiple of 48 --> \(y^3 = 2^4*3*k\) --> the least value of k for which \(2^4*3*k\) is a perfect cube is \(2^2*3^2\), therefore the least value of y is \(\sqrt[3]{2^4*3*2^2*3^2}=12\). Thus y must be divisible by 12. Sufficient.

(2) y^2 is a multiple of 30 --> \(y^2=2*3*5*m\) --> the least value of m for which \(2*3*5*m\) is a perfect square is \(2*3*5\), therefore the least value of y is \(\sqrt{2*3*5*2*3*5}=30\). Thus y may or may not be a multiple of 12. Not sufficient.

Answer: A.
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Kudos [?]: 139428 [3], given: 12790

1 KUDOS received
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 05 Jan 2017
Posts: 435

Kudos [?]: 64 [1], given: 15

Location: India
Premium Member
Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Feb 2017, 05:15
1
This post received
KUDOS
Prompt analysis
Y is a positive integer

Superset
The answer will be either yes or no

Translation
In order to find the answer, we need:
1# exact value of y
2# factors of y
3# some other information to predict the value of factors of y

Statement analysis

St 1: 48 = 2^4 x3 . so y^3 = 2^4 x 3. y^3 can be minimum 2^6 x 3^3. There fore y can be minimum 12. ANSWER

St 2: 30 = 2 x 3 x 5. y^2 can be minimum ( 2 x 3 x 5 )^2. Hance y can be minimum 30. Not a factor. INSUFFICIENT.

Option A

Kudos [?]: 64 [1], given: 15

Expert Post
Target Test Prep Representative
User avatar
S
Status: Founder & CEO
Affiliations: Target Test Prep
Joined: 14 Oct 2015
Posts: 2028

Kudos [?]: 1086 [0], given: 4

Location: United States (CA)
Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Dec 2017, 15:48
GMATBeast wrote:
Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

(1) y^3 is a multiple of 48
(2) y^2 is a multiple of 30


We need to determine whether y/12 is an integer.

Statement One Alone:

y^3 is a multiple of 48.

Since y^3/48 = integer, we can say that the product of 48 and some integer n is equal to a perfect cube. In other words, 48n = y^3.

We must remember that all perfect cubes break down to unique prime factors, each of which has an exponent that is a multiple of 3. So let’s break down 48 into primes to help determine what extra prime factors we need to make 48n a perfect cube.

48 = 16 x 3 = 2^4 x 3^1

In order to make 48n a perfect cube, we need two more 2s and two more 3s. Thus, the smallest perfect cube that is a multiple of 48 is 2^6 x 3^3.

To determine the least possible value of y, we can take the cube root of 2^6 x 3^3 and we have:

2^2 x 3 = 12

Thus, the minimum value of y is 12, so y/12 is an integer. Statement one alone is sufficient to answer the question.

Statement Two Alone:

y^2 is a multiple of 30.

Since y^2/30 = integer, we can say that the product of 30 and some integer m is equal to a perfect square. In other words, 30m = y^2.

We must remember that all perfect squares break down to unique prime factors, each of which has an exponent that is a multiple of 2. So let’s break down 30 into primes to help determine what extra prime factors we need to make 30m a perfect square.

30 = 5 x 3 x 2

In order to make 30m a perfect square, we need one more 2, one more 3, and one more 5. Thus, the smallest perfect square that is a multiple of 30 is 2^2 x 3^2 x 5^2.

To determine the least possible value of y, we can take the square root of 2^2 x 3^2 x 5^2 and we have:

2 x 3 x 5 = 30

Thus, the minimum value of y is 30; however if y is 30, then y/12 is not an integer; and if y is 60, then y/12 is an integer. Statement two alone is not sufficient to answer the question.

Answer: A
_________________

Scott Woodbury-Stewart
Founder and CEO

GMAT Quant Self-Study Course
500+ lessons 3000+ practice problems 800+ HD solutions

Kudos [?]: 1086 [0], given: 4

Re: Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?   [#permalink] 13 Dec 2017, 15:48
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Is the positive integer y a multiple of 12?

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.