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M12-35

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New post 15 Sep 2014, 23:48
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If the price increased by \(x\%\) from 2001 to 2002 and by \(y\%\) from 2002 to 2003, what is the percentage increase from 2001 to 2003?



(1) \(xy = 30\)

(2) \(100x + 100y + xy = 1330\)

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New post 15 Sep 2014, 23:48
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Official Solution:


If the price increased by \(x\%\) from 2001 to 2002 and by \(y\%\) from 2002 to 2003, what is the percentage increase from 2001 to 2003?

The price in 2001: \(p\);

The price in 2002: \(p*(1+\frac{x}{100})\);

The price in 2003: \(p*(1+\frac{x}{100})(1+\frac{y}{100})=p(1+\frac{y}{100}+\frac{x}{100}+\frac{xy}{10,000})\);

The percentage increase from 2001 to 2003 is \(\frac{2003-2001}{2001}*100=x+y+ \frac{xy}{100}\).

(1) \(xy=30\). Not sufficient.

(2) \(100x+100y+xy=1330\). Divide both sides by 100: \(x+y+\frac{xy}{100}=13.3\), directly gives the answer. Sufficient.


Answer: B
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Re: M12-35  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2015, 04:15
How do you calculate the Change: (2003-2001)/(2001) is obvious, but which values do you put in for the dates?

I can see that you get x/100 + y/100 + xy/10000 in the nominator because you subtract p, but don't you have to divide by "p" then?
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New post 08 Apr 2015, 04:55
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NilsH wrote:
How do you calculate the Change: (2003-2001)/(2001) is obvious, but which values do you put in for the dates?

I can see that you get x/100 + y/100 + xy/10000 in the nominator because you subtract p, but don't you have to divide by "p" then?


\(\frac{2003-2001}{2001}*100=\frac{p(1+\frac{y}{100}+\frac{x}{100}+\frac{xy}{10,000})-p}{p}*100=x+y+ \frac{xy}{100}\).
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New post 16 Jun 2015, 10:38
Bunuel wrote:
If the price increased by \(X\%\) from 2001 to 2002 and by \(Y\%\) from 2002 to 2003, what is the percentage increase from 2001 to 2003?



(1) \(XY = 30\)

(2) \(100X + 100Y + XY = 1330\)



Dear Bunuel

Could you explain step by step why 2 is sufficient. I don't see this ... what I know is that the compound increase could be calculated directly like this: (1+x/100)*(1+y/100)-1= Compound Increase

Thanks
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New post 16 Jun 2015, 10:47
reto wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
If the price increased by \(X\%\) from 2001 to 2002 and by \(Y\%\) from 2002 to 2003, what is the percentage increase from 2001 to 2003?



(1) \(XY = 30\)

(2) \(100X + 100Y + XY = 1330\)



Dear Bunuel

Could you explain step by step why 2 is sufficient. I don't see this ... what I know is that the compound increase could be calculated directly like this: (1+x/100)*(1+y/100)-1= Compound Increase

Thanks


We need to find the value of \(x+y+ \frac{xy}{100}\).

(2) says that \(100x+100y+xy=1330\). Divide both sides by 100: \(x+y+\frac{xy}{100}=13.3\).
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New post 17 Jun 2015, 09:49
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Bunuel wrote:
reto wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
If the price increased by \(X\%\) from 2001 to 2002 and by \(Y\%\) from 2002 to 2003, what is the percentage increase from 2001 to 2003?



(1) \(XY = 30\)

(2) \(100X + 100Y + XY = 1330\)



Dear Bunuel

Could you explain step by step why 2 is sufficient. I don't see this ... what I know is that the compound increase could be calculated directly like this: (1+x/100)*(1+y/100)-1= Compound Increase

Thanks


We need to find the value of \(x+y+ \frac{xy}{100}\).

(2) says that \(100x+100y+xy=1330\). Divide both sides by 100: \(x+y+\frac{xy}{100}=13.3\).


Okay. I am trying to find the logic behind and I would love to verify that the compound increase over 2 years calculated as (1.1*1.1)=21% is the same as this formula above, which I have never seen before. Every day I feel I need to start from the very beginning... :shock:
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Re: M12-35  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Oct 2016, 03:13
Bunuel wrote:
NilsH wrote:
How do you calculate the Change: (2003-2001)/(2001) is obvious, but which values do you put in for the dates?

I can see that you get x/100 + y/100 + xy/10000 in the nominator because you subtract p, but don't you have to divide by "p" then?


\(\frac{2003-2001}{2001}*100=\frac{p(1+\frac{y}{100}+\frac{x}{100}+\frac{xy}{10,000})-p}{p}*100=x+y+ \frac{xy}{100}\).



Sorry for the basic question but how did the equation for (2003-2001)/(2001)x100 become x+y+xy/100 ? I can not seem to foil out to get the result in bold.

Also, is there a link you can recommend for % change problems?

Thanks in advance.
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New post 11 Oct 2016, 05:12
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yousefalj wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
NilsH wrote:
How do you calculate the Change: (2003-2001)/(2001) is obvious, but which values do you put in for the dates?

I can see that you get x/100 + y/100 + xy/10000 in the nominator because you subtract p, but don't you have to divide by "p" then?


\(\frac{2003-2001}{2001}*100=\frac{p(1+\frac{y}{100}+\frac{x}{100}+\frac{xy}{10,000})-p}{p}*100=x+y+ \frac{xy}{100}\).



Sorry for the basic question but how did the equation for (2003-2001)/(2001)x100 become x+y+xy/100 ? I can not seem to foil out to get the result in bold.

Also, is there a link you can recommend for % change problems?

Thanks in advance.


\(\frac{2003-2001}{2001}*100=\frac{p(1+\frac{y}{100}+\frac{x}{100}+\frac{xy}{10,000})-p}{p}*100=\)

Reduce by p: \(((1+\frac{y}{100}+\frac{x}{100}+\frac{xy}{10,000})-1)*100\)

\((\frac{y}{100}+\frac{x}{100}+\frac{xy}{10,000})*100\)

\(=x+y+ \frac{xy}{100}\)
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New post 11 Oct 2016, 05:28
Ok i see where i was going wrong now.. thanks a lot, Bunuel.
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Re: M12-35  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Dec 2016, 11:43
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Hey guys, formulas may seem daunting for some people, and definitely true for me.

I plugged in simple numbers to verify my answer.
For example:

From 2001 to 2002 : 10% increase
From 2002 to 2003 : 20% increase

2001 : 100
2002 : 110 (10% increase from 100)
2003 : 132 (20% increase from 110)

From above, the increase is obviously 32%. (100 -> 132)

Statement (1) is obviously NOT Sufficient
Statement (2) on the other hand : x+ y + xy/100 -> 10+20+2 = 32

Statement (2) alone is sufficient. (B)
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Re: M12-35  [#permalink]

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New post 04 May 2017, 18:54
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I thought that on the Data Sufficiency questions, both statements have to be true (regardless of whether or not they are sufficient)

Now, Statement TWO cannot be true and sufficient, if according to Statement 1, XY = 30, which means that the sum of X + Y should add up to over 10 (such as 5+6 or 3+10). Both statements have to be true, which contradicts statement two where X+Y can't be greater than 8.

Am I missing something here?
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New post 14 Jan 2018, 07:05
DanceWithFire wrote:
I thought that on the Data Sufficiency questions, both statements have to be true (regardless of whether or not they are sufficient)

Now, Statement TWO cannot be true and sufficient, if according to Statement 1, XY = 30, which means that the sum of X + Y should add up to over 10 (such as 5+6 or 3+10). Both statements have to be true, which contradicts statement two where X+Y can't be greater than 8.

Am I missing something here?


You are right. Edited the question. Sorry it took so long.
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New post 01 Apr 2018, 11:41
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:


If the price increased by \(x\%\) from 2001 to 2002 and by \(y\%\) from 2002 to 2003, what is the percentage increase from 2001 to 2003?

The price in 2001: \(p\);

The price in 2002: \(p*(1+\frac{x}{100})\);

The price in 2003: \(p*(1+\frac{x}{100})(1+\frac{y}{100})\)


\(p*(1+\frac{x}{100})(1+\frac{y}{100})\) = p*(1.01x)(1.01y)

So if we know the value of xy, we can find the percentage inc from 2001 to 2003.
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New post 01 Apr 2018, 20:14
itisSheldon wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:


If the price increased by \(x\%\) from 2001 to 2002 and by \(y\%\) from 2002 to 2003, what is the percentage increase from 2001 to 2003?

The price in 2001: \(p\);

The price in 2002: \(p*(1+\frac{x}{100})\);

The price in 2003: \(p*(1+\frac{x}{100})(1+\frac{y}{100})\)


\(p*(1+\frac{x}{100})(1+\frac{y}{100})\) = p*(1.01x)(1.01y)

So if we know the value of xy, we can find the percentage inc from 2001 to 2003.
Bunuel
Where am i going wrong


How did you get the highlighted part?

\(p*(1+\frac{x}{100})(1+\frac{y}{100})=p(1+\frac{y}{100}+\frac{x}{100}+\frac{xy}{10,000})\) NOT p*(1.01x)(1.01y) and the the percentage increase from 2001 to 2003 is \(\frac{2003-2001}{2001}*100=x+y+ \frac{xy}{100}\).
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New post 02 Aug 2018, 05:46
Bunuel KarishmaB niks18 PKN chetan2u gmatbusters

I am at times more comfortable with decimals than fractions since later make me
intimated ;)

Can you explain what is incorrect here:
price in 2001: p
price in 2002: (1.0x) * p
price in 2003: (1.0y) * (1.0x) * p

% change = [ (new) - (old) ] / old

Now this is where I faltered: to multiply say 1.01 and 1.03 .
Is the best strategy to use fractions ie % (means to divide by 100)
I found (1+a) (1+b) = 1 + a + b + ab
too prone to mistake in calculations.

Let me know if there is any other approach that I can take?
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New post 24 Oct 2018, 06:00
adkikani wrote:
Bunuel KarishmaB niks18 PKN chetan2u gmatbusters

I am at times more comfortable with decimals than fractions since later make me
intimated ;)

Can you explain what is incorrect here:
price in 2001: p
price in 2002: (1.0x) * p
price in 2003: (1.0y) * (1.0x) * p

% change = [ (new) - (old) ] / old

Now this is where I faltered: to multiply say 1.01 and 1.03 .
Is the best strategy to use fractions ie % (means to divide by 100)
I found (1+a) (1+b) = 1 + a + b + ab
too prone to mistake in calculations.

Let me know if there is any other approach that I can take?



Hey i would like to know what exactly did u mean by this :
price in 2001: p
price in 2002: (1.0x) * p
price in 2003: (1.0y) * (1.0x) * p

i think u consider (X) a single digit .... for example if x= 5%
then price in 2002- 1.05 *p

if (X) is a two digit integer then.... for example if x=20%
the price in 2002- 1.2*p

this is where i guess u did a mistake.... its better like this - (100+x/100)*p
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New post 26 Nov 2018, 04:12
CPGguyMBA2018 wrote:
Hey guys, formulas may seem daunting for some people, and definitely true for me.

I plugged in simple numbers to verify my answer.
For example:

From 2001 to 2002 : 10% increase
From 2002 to 2003 : 20% increase

2001 : 100
2002 : 110 (10% increase from 100)
2003 : 132 (20% increase from 110)

From above, the increase is obviously 32%. (100 -> 132)

Statement (1) is obviously NOT Sufficient
Statement (2) on the other hand : x+ y + xy/100 -> 10+20+2 = 32

Statement (2) alone is sufficient. (B)




Is this solution ok? Since we are not doing anything on RHS
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