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Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with na

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Re: Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with na [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2017, 05:39
Its A.
First split is as/like. Here gene flaws are compared with anti-tumor drugs, clearly not a noun-noun comparison. This leaves us with A, C, E.
Comparing A, C and E: ......medical terminology, as are a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs,[now gene flaws are in early stage of testing and names are aimed at these new gene flaws] still in early testing, that are aimed at them.

In C: ...that are still in early testing.. implies anti-tumor drugs is in early testing
In E: comparing A and E, that makes more clear that names are associated with gene-flaws.

Hope this helps!
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Re: Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with na [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2017, 14:27
Hi, could an expert please help me with this explanation?
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Re: Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with na [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2017, 03:19
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poojamathur21 wrote:
Hi, could an expert please help me with this explanation?


B: Modifier error: "like a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs" wrongly refers to "terminology".
C: Conjunction "and" is missing before "aimed". Two items in a list MUST always be separated by a conjunction. The correct construction could be: "...that are still in early testing and are aimed at them."
D: Same error as in B.
E: There is the conjunction "and", but there is no item parallel to the verb "aimed" before "and". (Without the comma before "and" the sentence could still be considered correct: the prepostional phrase modifier "still in early testing" and the past participle modifier "aimed at them" can be considered parallel, referring to "anti-tumor drugs".)
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Re: Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with na [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 14 May 2017, 21:29
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There seems to some basic perceptional problem ingrained in this question.
1. The term gene -flaws - is not a new term to medical terminology. it just describes a status. Maybe the names that have been given to them are the newcomers.
No GMAT question- starts by saying, 'many of these gene -flaws". -- 'these' is a more colloquial demonstrative pronoun than a formal one.
The reference to them could be either to the flaws or to the newcomers. Which one logically?
4. Of course, VERITAS may not care much about the difference between 'like' and 'such as', whereas we know GMAT does bother about this tenet. That is why I suppose Veritas is habitually using the phrase "names like BCR-ABL", although BCR -ABL is just an example of the names
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Originally posted by daagh on 05 May 2017, 10:01.
Last edited by daagh on 14 May 2017, 21:29, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with na [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2017, 10:20
If we remove the fluffs,then the sentence would look like this:X( gene flaws) are relative newcomers to Y( medical terminology),as are a majority of the Zs (new anti-tumor drugs), still in early testing, that are aimed at them.

This sentence look alright.B and D are out because X and Y should be compared with as instead of like.

C is wrong because of the wrong construction.Its look like "aimed at them" is modifying testing.
E is wrong because and should be followed by an independent clause but in E its followed by a fragment.

So A wins.
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Re: Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with na [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2017, 14:08
poojamathur21 wrote:
Hi, could an expert please help me with this explanation?


B: Modifier error: "like a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs" wrongly refers to "terminology".
C: Conjunction "and" is missing before "aimed". Two items in a list MUST always be separated by a conjunction. The correct construction could be: "...that are still in early testing and are aimed at them."
D: Same error as in B.
E: There is the conjunction "and", but there is no item parallel to the verb "aimed" before "and". (Without the comma before "and" the sentence could still be considered correct: the prepostional phrase modifier "still in early testing" and the past participle modifier "aimed at them" can be considered parallel, referring to "anti-tumor drugs".)
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Re: Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with na [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2017, 06:56
Can anyone tell me difference between A and D ? ",as are a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs," and "like a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs",
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Re: Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with na [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2017, 01:41
Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with names like BCR-ABL - are relative newcomers to medical terminology, as are a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs, still in early testing, that are aimed at them.

A. medical terminology, as are a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs, still in early testing, that are aimed at them.
--> correct.

B. medical terminology like a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs that are still in early testing, and aimed at them.

C. medical terminology, as are a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs that are still in early testing, aimed at them.

D. medical terminology like a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs, still in early testing, that are aimed at them.

E. medical terminology, as are a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs, still in early testing, and aimed at them.
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Re: Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with na [#permalink]

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New post 05 Nov 2017, 21:06
gmat2014p wrote:
Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with names like BCR-ABL - are relative newcomers to medical terminology, as are a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs, still in early testing, that are aimed at them.

A. medical terminology, as are a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs, still in early testing, that are aimed at them.
B. medical terminology like a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs that are still in early testing, and aimed at them.
C. medical terminology, as are a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs that are still in early testing, aimed at them.
D. medical terminology like a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs, still in early testing, that are aimed at them.
E. medical terminology, as are a majority of the new anti-tumor drugs, still in early testing, and aimed at them.

Meaning - The sentence is doing a comparison between 2 entities (clauses) in terms of their " relative newness"
Clause 1 involves gene flaws and Clause 2 involves anti-tumor drugs

POE:

C & D are out because they use "like" to compare clauses
B - "aimed at them" - it is not clear what this modifies
E - "and aimed at them" is not parallel are relative newcomers .. does not make sense

A is the correct answer



----------------------------------------

like can be used .
both of them(C&D) could not be eliminated by that reason. (C & D are out because they use "like" to compare clauses)
Re: Many of these gene flaws - there are plenty of them, with na   [#permalink] 05 Nov 2017, 21:06

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