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Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the

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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2017, 03:41
Two independent clauses without FANBOYS is a run on splice. FANBOYS is required to join them. Option (C) uses the correct form of except.

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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 27 Mar 2017, 22:34
[Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years], - Independent Clause
[excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.] - Independent Clause

Remember FANBOYS acronym? Two independent clauseS must be connected with a conjugation and hence some conjugation is required. Only C and D have conjugation but which sounds good. So, A, B and E out.
A - excepting for
B - except in
C - but except in
D - but excepting for
E - with the exception of

but excepting for sounds awkward and wrong too. Hence answer is C.

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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2017, 02:12
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

we have two complete sentences (Subject + Verb), so we need a FANBOYS (but). --> A, B and E are out.
The right idiom is except, not excepting --> D is out --> C is correct.

A - excepting for
B - except in
C - but except in
D - but excepting for
E - with the exception of
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 16 May 2017, 06:46
sondenso wrote:
snowbirdskier wrote:
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island. (GMAT practice test from mba.com)

A - excepting for
B - except in
C - but except in
D - but excepting for
E - with the exception of


The sentence includes two independent clauses, so a conjuntion should be used to connect two clauses. A, B, E out

"excepting" in D modifies "the English language" --> awkward

C is the winner


A "Excepting for" is not a conjunction.
B "Excepting for" is not a conjunction.
C Correct
D "Excepting for" is not the right idiom.
E "With the exception of" is not a conjunction.

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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2017, 07:25
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.


Meaning:
Mauritius was a British colony for a pretty long time i.e. almost 200 years. The sentence presents a contrast after the comma. Though Mauritius was a British colony, english language was never really spoken on the island except in domains of administration and teaching.


Error:
1) Comma+verb ing is incorrect here and the placement of the modifier does not really make sense.
2) As the sentence presents a contrast, we need a contrast word such as but.


Let's have a look at the choices:
A - excepting for INCORRECT
B - except in INCORRECT (It distorts the meaning of the sentence)
C - but except in CORRECT (But (FANBOYS) after the comma correctly connects two independent clauses)
D - but excepting for INCORRECT
E - with the exception of INCORRECT
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 31 May 2017, 09:41
TommyWallach wrote:
The OA is C on this one (I don't know who said differently). B is a run-on sentence. If you start the clause with "except," it's independent, so you should've had a period or semicolon.

-t

but according to my knowledge independent clause must have subject and verb and i am unable to find subject and verb in this sentence
please help me

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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2017, 11:21
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

A - excepting for - Run on sentence
B - except in - Run on sentence
C - but except in - Correct - conjunction(FANBOYS) needed to join to two independent clauses
D - but excepting for - excepting for is unidiomatic
E - with the exception of - Run on sentence

Answer C
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2017, 11:28
rishabhmishra wrote:
TommyWallach wrote:
The OA is C on this one (I don't know who said differently). B is a run-on sentence. If you start the clause with "except," it's independent, so you should've had a period or semicolon.

-t

but according to my knowledge independent clause must have subject and verb and i am unable to find subject and verb in this sentence
please help me


Hi rishabhmishra ,
The subject and verb in the two independent clauses have been color coded .


Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

Hope this helps!! :)
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2017, 05:35
Skywalker18 wrote:
rishabhmishra wrote:
TommyWallach wrote:
The OA is C on this one (I don't know who said differently). B is a run-on sentence. If you start the clause with "except," it's independent, so you should've had a period or semicolon.

-t

but according to my knowledge independent clause must have subject and verb and i am unable to find subject and verb in this sentence
please help me


Hi rishabhmishra ,
The subject and verb in the two independent clauses have been color coded .


Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

Hope this helps!! :)

thanks bro but after , but dr is no subject and verb if its independent clause dr must be one then it will became clause

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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2017, 05:43
rishabhmishra wrote:
thanks bro but after , but dr is no subject and verb if its independent clause dr must be one then it will became clause

Hi rishabhmishra,

before the but:

i) Subject: Mauritius
ii) Verb: was


after the but:

i) Subject: the English language
ii) Verb: was

Also, it may be useful to note that presence/absence of a verb/subject does not differentiate an independent clause from a dependent clause. Both these types of clauses (independent and dependent) have a subject and a verb.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses types of clauses, their application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2017, 13:17
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and
teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

Meaning : Although Mauritius was a British colony for 200 years, English was never really spoken on the island except in the domains of admin and teaching.

A. excepting for
The preposition “for” is incorrect as we want to say “in the domains of X and Y”..
Also, “excepting” is incorrect we need “except”
Contrast word is NOT present hence changing the meaning…and two Independent clauses cannot be joined by a comma alone..

B. except in
Contrast word is NOT present hence changing the meaning…and two Independent clauses cannot be joined by a comma alone..

C. but except in
Correct

D. but excepting for
As explained in A “excepting” and “for” both are incorrect

E. with the exception of
“except in” is much more precise and succinct…plus lack of contrast word changes the meaning… and two Independent clauses cannot be joined by a comma alone..
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2017, 05:23
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

A - excepting for ==> usage of "excepting" is incorrect, also, instead of "for" the it should have "in" - Furthermore, this is a run on sentence as it is not connected with the help of a FANBOY connector

B - except in ==> Missing the FANBOY connector, ideally a connector that can describe a contrast between two sentences. "but" will be appropriate usage here.

C - but except in ==> CORRECT - Usage of FANBOY correctly connects two independent clauses, and usage of "in" is also correct.

D - but excepting for ==> usage of "excepting for" is incorrect

E - with the exception of ==>Run on sentence as the sentence is not connected with the help of a FANBOY connector. And usage of "with the exception of" is also incorrect.

Hence, Answer is C
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2017, 20:14
snowbirdskier wrote:
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island. (GMAT practice test from mba.com)

A - excepting for
B - except in
C - but except in
D - but excepting for
E - with the exception of

OG16 SC117


Imo C

We need to show contrast that in spite of being a colony for almost 200 years English was not spoken in that country .

Only C and D remain .
D uses verb-ing modifier which is wrong
So C is our answer
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2017, 07:03
carcass wrote:
really really tough answer :(

First of all I saw the list of all idioms on this board in excel format and I didn't find it.

Secondly i have searched on different site and nothing

Yet, i have found this

Use Except Correctly:

Use except as a preposition to mean excluding or but. "Everyone went to the party except Jonathan."

Use as a conjunction to mean only, or with the exception, often followed by the word "that." "The twins are identical except that one has longer hair than the other."

Use as an idiom to mean "if it weren't for" something. "Sandra would go back to college except for lack of time and money."

Use as a verb to mean to exclude or leave out, or to object. "Let's except that item from the list."

I picked B for POE (not so far away, indeed)...........


Except can also be used as a conjunction.
It implies but and except are redundant. So why B is incorrect?

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Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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Paras237 wrote:
Except can also be used as a conjunction.
It implies but and except are redundant. So why B is incorrect?



Hello Paras237,

I will be glad to help you out with one. :-)


When two words having the same meaning is used in a sentence to convey an idea, redundancy error takes place. For example,


1. He annually participates in a marathon every year.

2. Although she is good in English literature, but she could not score well in the exam.

In both the above-mentioned sentence, we spot redundancy error because annually and every year in sentence 1 and although and but in sentence 2 mean the same and present the same idea.


However, in the context of this official sentence, use of but and except together does not lead to redundancy error because both these words have been used to present two different contrasts as follows.

Contrast 1 = Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but the English language was never really spoken on the island.

Contrast 2 = Except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

As you can see, while but presents the contrast with regards to English not being spoken in Mauritius despite it being a British colony for two centuries, use of except tells us that in which areas the language was used.

Remove any of the word from the sentence and you will see that the sentence misses something.

Also, comma + but is required in the sentence to join the two independent clauses -

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years
the English language was never really spoken on the island.



Hope this helps. :-)
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2017, 05:28
C is the winner :)
We need to highlight contrast here.
But, However,Despite are contrast marker and hence that's correct :)

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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2017, 10:36
snowbirdskier wrote:
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

(A) excepting for
(B) except in
(C) but except in
(D) but excepting for
(E) with the exception of

OG16 SC117


Sentence Analysis
The sentence says that Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years. As we read further, we see that there is some exception we’re talking about. The sentence says “excepting for the domains of administration and teaching”. First, “excepting for” is idiomatically incorrect. We don’t use ‘for’ with ‘excepting’. (However, we do use ‘for’ with ‘except’). Second, this exception doesn’t seem to apply to what we have read so far; probably it’ll apply to the latter part of the sentence.

The sentence then says “the English language was never really spoken on the island”. As we read this part, we observe two things:

The exception presented earlier applies to this part of the sentence. The exception means that English was probably spoken in the domains of administration and teaching. Now, having understood the context of this exception, we see that we need ‘in’ as the preposition, not ‘for’, as given in “excepting for”. This part is an independent clause in itself. Thus, we have two independent clauses joined by a comma. We have a punctuation error here.

Option Analysis
(A) Incorrect. For the errors described above.

(B) Incorrect. For the punctuation error: Two independent clauses are joined by a comma.

(C) Correct. The two independent clauses are now correctly joined by comma + but.

(D) Incorrect. As we discussed in the sentence analysis, “excepting for” is incorrect. Besides, we need the preposition “in” in the sentence.

(E) Incorrect. For the below reasons:

Two independent clauses joined by a comma.
“with the exception of” distorts the meaning. Now, it is not clear to which aspect it is presenting an exception.

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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 04 Nov 2017, 08:48
@egmat and @mikemcgarry
Can you please help me splitting up the sentences into clauses. According to the og solution the two clauses here are
1) Mauritius was a British.......200 years
2) expecting...island
Why cant i split it into two clauses this way:
1)Mauritius was...teaching ( being the first clause)
2)the english....island

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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2017, 08:17
anandch1994 wrote:
egmat and mikemcgarry
Can you please help me splitting up the sentences into clauses. According to the og solution the two clauses here are
1) Mauritius was a British.......200 years
2) expecting...island
Why cant i split it into two clauses this way:
1)Mauritius was...teaching ( being the first clause)
2)the english....island


In that case you would be creating a run-on sentence, i.e. two independent clauses separated only by a comma (without a conjunction).

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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2017, 14:10
anandch1994 wrote:
egmat and mikemcgarry
Can you please help me splitting up the sentences into clauses. According to the og solution the two clauses here are
1) Mauritius was a British.......200 years
2) expecting...island
Why cant i split it into two clauses this way:
1)Mauritius was...teaching ( being the first clause)
2)the english....island




Hello anandch1994,

Thank you for the query. I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)

Let's take a good look at the sentence:

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching,

the English language was never really spoken on the island
.


(subjects = blue, verbs = green)

As you can see, the sentence has above-mentioned two clauses. Both the clauses are Independent clauses (ICs) as the phrase excepting for... just acts as a modifier for the second IC. These two ICs are connected by just a comma. This structure is not correct as two ICs need comma + FANBOYS or a semicolon or a dash in between for grammatical connection.

On the basis of this connection in the sentence, we can eliminate Choice A, B, and E.

Now between Choice C and D, C is the correct answer as it uses the correct idiom except in.



Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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