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Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the

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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 20 May 2018, 12:17
egmat wrote:
anandch1994 wrote:
egmat and mikemcgarry
Can you please help me splitting up the sentences into clauses. According to the og solution the two clauses here are
1) Mauritius was a British.......200 years
2) expecting...island
Why cant i split it into two clauses this way:
1)Mauritius was...teaching ( being the first clause)
2)the english....island




Hello anandch1994,

Thank you for the query. I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)

Let's take a good look at the sentence:

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching,

the English language was never really spoken on the island
.


(subjects = blue, verbs = green)

As you can see, the sentence has above-mentioned two clauses. Both the clauses are Independent clauses (ICs) as the phrase excepting for... just acts as a modifier for the second IC. These two ICs are connected by just a comma. This structure is not correct as two ICs need comma + FANBOYS or a semicolon or a dash in between for grammatical connection.

On the basis of this connection in the sentence, we can eliminate Choice A, B, and E.

Now between Choice C and D, C is the correct answer as it uses the correct idiom except in.



Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha


1) I was always thinking that if an......... independent clause.......... is followed by a "comma"..... modifier........ "comma" ......another independent clause...... then you don't need FANBOYS to connect
please help me on this
2) how except in domains of administration and teaching is an independent clause?
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2018, 15:15
kunalkhanna wrote:


"except in the domains of administration and teaching" , I want to have clarity on the subject and verb of this clause





Hello kunalkhanna,

This is in response to your PM. I apologize for getting back to this one a bit late.


In the phrase except in the domains of administration and teaching, there is no SV pair. Hence, it is not a clause. This phrase is the modifier for the clause that follows it: the English language (subject) was never really spoken (verb) on the island.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2019, 15:23
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one issue at a time, and narrow it down to the right choice! It's a pretty short sentence, so this should be a quick one to answer! To start, here is the original question with the major differences between the options highlighted in orange:

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

(A) excepting for
(B) except in
(C) but except in
(D) but excepting for
(E) with the exception of

Okay, to be honest, you could highlight everything in each option because they're short and all different. However, if you look at the entire sentence, carefully, a major clue should jump out at you:

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

We have two INDEPENDENT CLAUSES in here with a phrase separating them. Whenever we have two independent clauses in a sentence, what do we need to have to connect them? A conjunction or a semicolon!

Let's take a look at each sentence with the non-underlined parts worked back in. Make sure that there is some way to separate the two independent clauses that is grammatically correct (a conjunction or semicolon):

(A) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is INCORRECT because there is no conjunction to connect the two independent clauses together. It's actually a run-on sentence with a modifier in between to throw you off! A modifier is not good enough to separate two independent clauses - it MUST be a conjunction or semicolon.

(B) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is also INCORRECT because it doesn't have a conjunction to connect our two independent clauses! A modifier in between them isn't good enough!

(C) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is CORRECT! It uses the coordinating conjunction "but" to combine the two independent clauses together to create one complete sentence.

(D) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is INCORRECT. While it does use the conjunction "but" to combine the two clauses, we have an idiom problem. The phrase "excepting for" is not an acceptable idiom in English. "Except in" or "with the exception of" are the correct forms of this idiom.

(E) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, with the exception of the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is INCORRECT because it doesn't use a conjunction to connect the two independent clauses. It's one long run-on sentence with a modifier in between, which isn't good enough to work.


There you have it - option C is the correct choice! It's the only one that uses a conjunction to connect two independent clauses together AND doesn't have any idiom issues.


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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2019, 08:55
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

"Administration" is a noun & "Teaching" here is acting like a activity so, it's a gerund
Noun and Gerund


Is there no mistake of parallelism here ?
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2019, 13:01
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Smitc007 wrote:
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

"Administration" is a noun & "Teaching" here is acting like a activity so, it's a gerund
Noun and Gerund


Is there no mistake of parallelism here ?
egmat AjiteshArun


Hello Smitc007!

In this sentence, both "administration" and "teaching" are referring to two different career fields - and it's okay that they're worded differently. Teaching is not considered an action verb here - it's how we refer to the career field that teachers work in. If this was your own writing, and you wanted to make it sound more parallel, you could certainly change "teaching" to "education," but the meaning there is a little less clear. Education encompasses a lot more than just teachers and their work, so "teaching" is the clearer term here.

When it comes to how we refer to career fields, they have a variety of endings:

Accounting / Construction / Management / Writing / Communication / Logistics

I hope this helps!
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2019, 13:32
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one issue at a time, and narrow it down to the right choice! It's a pretty short sentence, so this should be a quick one to answer! To start, here is the original question with the major differences between the options highlighted in orange:

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

(A) excepting for
(B) except in
(C) but except in
(D) but excepting for
(E) with the exception of

Okay, to be honest, you could highlight everything in each option because they're short and all different. However, if you look at the entire sentence, carefully, a major clue should jump out at you:

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

We have two INDEPENDENT CLAUSES in here with a phrase separating them. Whenever we have two independent clauses in a sentence, what do we need to have to connect them? A conjunction or a semicolon!

Let's take a look at each sentence with the non-underlined parts worked back in. Make sure that there is some way to separate the two independent clauses that is grammatically correct (a conjunction or semicolon):

(A) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is INCORRECT because there is no conjunction to connect the two independent clauses together. It's actually a run-on sentence with a modifier in between to throw you off! A modifier is not good enough to separate two independent clauses - it MUST be a conjunction or semicolon.

(B) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is also INCORRECT because it doesn't have a conjunction to connect our two independent clauses! A modifier in between them isn't good enough!

(C) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is CORRECT! It uses the coordinating conjunction "but" to combine the two independent clauses together to create one complete sentence.

(D) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is INCORRECT. While it does use the conjunction "but" to combine the two clauses, we have an idiom problem. The phrase "excepting for" is not an acceptable idiom in English. "Except in" or "with the exception of" are the correct forms of this idiom.

(E) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, with the exception of the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is INCORRECT because it doesn't use a conjunction to connect the two independent clauses. It's one long run-on sentence with a modifier in between, which isn't good enough to work.


There you have it - option C is the correct choice! It's the only one that uses a conjunction to connect two independent clauses together AND doesn't have any idiom issues.


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.


Hi,

I have a doubt. I get the whole reasoning why A and B are run-on sentences but I am just confused about option C.

In the main sentence except in the domains of administration and teaching acts as a modifier

But in option C what do the below highlighted parts act as?

except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island - Do they act as 1 independent clause or is the first part still a modifier ? how can teaching, the engish language......... make sense?
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2019, 10:47
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Sanjeetgujrall wrote:
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one issue at a time, and narrow it down to the right choice! It's a pretty short sentence, so this should be a quick one to answer! To start, here is the original question with the major differences between the options highlighted in orange:

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

(A) excepting for
(B) except in
(C) but except in
(D) but excepting for
(E) with the exception of

Okay, to be honest, you could highlight everything in each option because they're short and all different. However, if you look at the entire sentence, carefully, a major clue should jump out at you:

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

We have two INDEPENDENT CLAUSES in here with a phrase separating them. Whenever we have two independent clauses in a sentence, what do we need to have to connect them? A conjunction or a semicolon!

Let's take a look at each sentence with the non-underlined parts worked back in. Make sure that there is some way to separate the two independent clauses that is grammatically correct (a conjunction or semicolon):

(A) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is INCORRECT because there is no conjunction to connect the two independent clauses together. It's actually a run-on sentence with a modifier in between to throw you off! A modifier is not good enough to separate two independent clauses - it MUST be a conjunction or semicolon.

(B) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is also INCORRECT because it doesn't have a conjunction to connect our two independent clauses! A modifier in between them isn't good enough!

(C) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is CORRECT! It uses the coordinating conjunction "but" to combine the two independent clauses together to create one complete sentence.

(D) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is INCORRECT. While it does use the conjunction "but" to combine the two clauses, we have an idiom problem. The phrase "excepting for" is not an acceptable idiom in English. "Except in" or "with the exception of" are the correct forms of this idiom.

(E) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, with the exception of the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is INCORRECT because it doesn't use a conjunction to connect the two independent clauses. It's one long run-on sentence with a modifier in between, which isn't good enough to work.


There you have it - option C is the correct choice! It's the only one that uses a conjunction to connect two independent clauses together AND doesn't have any idiom issues.


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.


Hi,

I have a doubt. I get the whole reasoning why A and B are run-on sentences but I am just confused about option C.

In the main sentence except in the domains of administration and teaching acts as a modifier

But in option C what do the below highlighted parts act as?

except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island - Do they act as 1 independent clause or is the first part still a modifier ? how can teaching, the engish language......... make sense?


Hello Sanjeetgujrall!

Thank you for your question. Let's take a look at option C to break down each part's function:

(C) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years = INDEPENDENT CLAUSE
except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island. = INDEPENDENT CLAUSE
but = COORDINATING CONJUNCTION (what we use to connect 2 independent clauses together)

The phrase "except in the domains of administration and teaching" is still a modifier here - it's modifying "the English language." This would still be the case if you split these 2 independent clauses into 2 separate sentences. We just needed to make sure that there was a conjunction to join the 2 independent clauses together, otherwise the modifier sounds confusing and unclear. Here is how the options break down:

Options A, B, & E are run-on sentences because there is no conjunction joining the 2 independent clauses together.
Option D uses a conjunction, but the phrase "excepting for" isn't idiomatically correct, so we rule that out.
This leaves us with option C - the only one that uses the right idiom and a conjunction.

I hope this helps!
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Oct 2019, 01:52
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!


This is INCORRECT. While it does use the conjunction "but" to combine the two clauses, we have an idiom problem. The phrase "excepting for" is not an acceptable idiom in English. "Except in" or "with the exception of" are the correct forms of this idiom.

(E) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, with the exception of the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.


Hi,

I understand "excepting for" is not an acceptable idiom, but how about "except for"? As a matter of fact that GMAC does use the phrase "except for" (eg,Except for a concert performance that the composer himself staged in 1911, Scott Joplin's ragtime opera Treemonisha was not produced until 1972, sixty-one years after its completion.).

Can you please explain the difference between "except in" and "except for"?

Thanks!
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2019, 11:53
el1234 wrote:
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!


This is INCORRECT. While it does use the conjunction "but" to combine the two clauses, we have an idiom problem. The phrase "excepting for" is not an acceptable idiom in English. "Except in" or "with the exception of" are the correct forms of this idiom.

(E) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, with the exception of the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.


Hi,

I understand "excepting for" is not an acceptable idiom, but how about "except for"? As a matter of fact that GMAC does use the phrase "except for" (eg,Except for a concert performance that the composer himself staged in 1911, Scott Joplin's ragtime opera Treemonisha was not produced until 1972, sixty-one years after its completion.).

Can you please explain the difference between "except in" and "except for"?

Thanks!


Hi el1234!

First, "except for" is idiomatically correct, but "excepting for" is not.

There really isn't much difference between "except in" and "except for." Which one you choose depends on the context of the sentence you're adding it to:

I like all Halloween candy, except for the ones that contain caramel.
The character shows up throughout the book, except in chapters 2 and 3.

I hope this helps!
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the   [#permalink] 15 Oct 2019, 11:53

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