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Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge

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Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 21 Oct 2018, 20:43
5
6
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

44% (00:53) correct 56% (00:44) wrong based on 513 sessions

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Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Germania as an ethnographic treatise.


(A) scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Germania as

(B) scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Germania as if

(C) scholars, categorizing of Tacitus’s Germania as

(D) scholars who categorize Tacitus’s Germania as

(E) scholars who categorize Tacitus’s Germania if


Okay, I made this Q incorrect. Why D is not good. Is it because critics are amused by scholars' categorizing and not by scholars.
How do we know what the writer wants to say??

Thanks

Originally posted by zoltan on 14 Nov 2007, 07:39.
Last edited by Bunuel on 21 Oct 2018, 20:43, edited 2 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jan 2008, 05:17
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I think you all have missed the point of this problem. We are trying to talk about ALL early scholars. I'll give you an example:

example 1: Early scholars who categorize.
Meaning: This is not referring to ALL early scholars, but refers only to those early scholars who categorize. Some early scholars categorized, while other early scholars did not categorize.

example 2: Early scholars, who categorize.
meaning: ALL early scholars categorize. The placement of comma created a non-essential sentence that gives some extra unimportant information about ALL early scholars.

The placement of comma makes a huge difference. In our problem, ALL modern critics are amazed by ALL early scholars. Therefore, D and E are out. In option C, "categorizing" seem to refer to "amused" which is wrong. B is out because of "if", therefore A is our correct answer.
hope this helps
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2007, 18:14
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Critics are amused by the "act" of scholars' which seems to disdain them. They are not amused by the scholars' ( unless it's mentioned they are clowns!! )

So A seems allright to me.

B is wrong because of "as if"

C is wrong ..no meaning.

D is wrong.. they are not amused by scholars. They are amused by the act of scholars', which is to categorize X as Y.

E is wrong.... again same error as in D and also "if".
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2008, 14:05
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IMO A.

Modern critics are not amused by early scholars but they are amused by early scholar's categorizing..... hence C,D,E are out. Among A and B. A is the best.
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2008, 23:26
1
OA is A
Agree all the other choices change the meaning
But I read a rule in one of the notes that
possessive+present participle is always wrong
thats the reason I picked D
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 04 Sep 2008, 08:55
2
hibloom wrote:
OA is A
Agree all the other choices change the meaning
But I read a rule in one of the notes that
possessive+present participle is always wrong
thats the reason I picked D



I used the same reasoning. I don't understand what makes the exception here. Can somebody just explain rather than say changing the meaning? It changed the meaning from what to what?

Would someone please explain what meaning got changed in each answer choice?

Originally posted by tarek99 on 04 Sep 2008, 08:36.
Last edited by tarek99 on 04 Sep 2008, 08:55, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2009, 12:43
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I agree with the poster above, A

First of all, B and E are falling out because of "if". Remember that on GMAT when you have an "if" clause you must continue with "then"; and "then" does not show up anywhere.

C falls out because it creates ambiguity. The author intended to say that critics are amused with scholars who did something. Here it is hard to say who categorized Tacitus's Germania

A is correct because that not-underlined "by" means that you need passive voice. "who categorize" is not passive, so that should be it
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2010, 05:04
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My reasoning for A:

A) - weird.. uses possessives.. sounds odd.. but nothing explicitly wrong.. so hold on
B) - 'as if' is used for hypothetical situation.. Hence, changes the meaning
C) - 'categorizing' followed by comma - modifies the whole phrase - giving the impression that Modern critics categorized and not the scholars. That is not the intended meaning. Also, grammatically, 'of' following categorizing is not correct. For example: I wrote a book, listing all the chapters -- is correct but I wrote a book, listing of all the chapters -- doesn't make any sense.
D) - 'early scholar who categorize' -- problem1 -- gives the impression that critics are amused by scholars not the work. Problem2 -- gives the impression that scholars are still there and they usually categorize. The intended meaning is 'early scholar who categorizED'.
E) - same as D.

Hence A: best out of the worst.
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jun 2012, 06:18
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I feel there is no need to get confused here between A and D. Both focus on vastly different factors. .

1. A Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Germania as
2. D Modern critics are amused by early scholars who categorize Tacitus’s Germania as

Let us read them as simple sentences without the paraphrelinia.
Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ --- Is the theme complete? Unless the categorizing is attached, this will simply remain unfinished . So A is concerned about categorizing.

On the contrary, D can survive without the relative clause introduced by who
Therefore, D is concerned about scholars. This is the basic difference between the two.
The original intends to converge on categorizing, while D distorts that intent.

I don't think, we have permission to distort the intention in SC . Therefore, A is correct
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2012, 08:52
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I think both options are having different meanings.

A) scholars' categorizing Bach's Cello Suites as : Means critics are amused by scholars action.
D) scholars who categorize Bach's Cello Suites as : Means critics are amused by scholars. This choice distorts the original meaning.
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Nov 2012, 09:21
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Answer choice is A

"Of" would be used for "categorization OF Bach's Cello Suites".
But the way categorizing is used in the sentence, it's an action verb. Someone is "categorizing" (as a verb) Bach's Cello Suites as artistic masterpieces. Who? It's the scholars. Their "categorizing Bach's Cello Suites as artistic masterpieces" amused modern critics.
Their [something] amused modern critics.
And that [something] is their [categorizing Bach's Cello Suites as artistic masterpieces].
So since we are using action verb categorizING and not the noun of "categorization" - we do not use OF.

The key here is to focus on what the critics are amused by. They are not amused by scholars. Rather, they are amused by scholar's [something].
That [something] is a phrase. That phrase is not just limited to the portion underlined. In this case, it would be [categorizing Bach's Cello Suites as artistic masterpieces.]
So, modern critics are amused by scholars' [categorizing Bach's Cello Suites as artistic masterpieces.]
You can also say they are amused by scholars' categorization - however, the use of categorization is not one of the answer choices. Instead, you have to find another phrase that captures a noun phrase and the above example (A) does that.
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2014, 05:27
linglinrtw wrote:
(A) scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Germania as
(B) scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Germania as if (as if is a bit awkward and changes the meaning slightly)
(C) scholars, categorizing of Tacitus’s Germania as (modifying scholars)
(D) scholars who categorize Tacitus’s Germania as (changes the meaning, amused by the categorization, not the scholars)
(E) scholars who categorize Tacitus’s Germania if (changes the meaning, amused by the categorization, not the scholars)

Good analysis of D and E. However, "categorizing" is not modifying "scholars" in C - instead, "categorizing" is modifying the entire preceding clause "Modern critics are amused by early scholars".

-ing can be one of three things:
1. verb
2. noun
3. present participle modifier

To be a verb, -ing must have a "to be" in front of it (ex. I am typing). That doesn't happen here.
To be a noun, -ing has to be a subject or an object of something (i.e. it has to function as a noun). That also doesn't happen here.
So, "categorizing" is a present participle modifier.

Without a preceding comma, a present participle modifier gives us restrictive (necessary to identify) information about the preceding noun or noun phrase. For example:

"The girl playing the piano is excellent." Here "playing the piano" is giving us information about the girl - information that we need to know in order to identify which girl is excellent.


However, with a preceding comma, a present participle modifier gives us additional information about the entire preceding clause. For exmaple:

"The girl played the piano, striking each key with precision." Here "striking each key with precision" is modifying the entire preceding clause "the girl played the piano" - it is telling us that, while playing the piano, she is striking each key with precision. Notice, and this is the point of all of this, that we are not saying that the immediately preceding noun ("piano") is striking each key, rather we are saying that the subject of the preceding clause ("girl") is striking each key.


By the way, sometimes we see this:

"The girl played the piano, masterfully striking each key with precision." This is the same as before - the addition of "masterfully" doesn't change it because it is just modifying the modifier (telling us how she is striking each key with precision).


Back to the original sentence, C says:

"Modern critics are amused by early scholars, categorizing of Tacitus’s Germania as an ethnographic treatise."

"Categorizing" is modifying the immediately preceding clause "Modern critics are amused by early scholars", meaning that, in their being amused by the scholars, modern critics also categorize Tacitus’s Germania as an ethnographic treatise. Notice here that the present participle modifier preceded by a comma is modifying the subject of the immediately preceding clause ("modern critics"), not the immediately preceding noun ("scholars"). That's a big difference.

This still has a distorted meaning because we actually want the scholars to be the ones doing the categorizing. D and E correctly have the scholars doing the categorizing, but they are wrong because they have the critics being amused by the scholars (and which scholars? the ones who tend to categorize...) when instead we want the critics to be amused by the characterization itself.

I only make this point because present participle modifiers that are set off by commas are somewhat commonly tested on the GMAT, so we need to be really careful about what they modify.
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2017, 01:00
Hi,

Although I understood the explanation given for A, I am not sure how would we know whether one should select A or D.

A looks very awkward while D looks very clear and concise.

Are we rejecting D only because Amused by cannot be followed by Scholar? Please confirm.
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2017, 04:58
abhimahna wrote:
Hi,

Although I understood the explanation given for A, I am not sure how would we know whether one should select A or D.

A looks very awkward while D looks very clear and concise.

Are we rejecting D only because Amused by cannot be followed by Scholar? Please confirm.


D is wrong because of the wrong tense of the verb "categorize". The sentence implies that early scholars categorize in the present.

Yes, options similar to A are generally found among the wrong answers in GMAT.
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Re: Modern critics are amused by early scholars’ categorizing Tacitus’s Ge  [#permalink]

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