GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 20 Nov 2018, 22:29

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in November
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
28293031123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
2526272829301
Open Detailed Calendar
  • All GMAT Club Tests are Free and open on November 22nd in celebration of Thanksgiving Day!

     November 22, 2018

     November 22, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Mark your calendars - All GMAT Club Tests are free and open November 22nd to celebrate Thanksgiving Day! Access will be available from 0:01 AM to 11:59 PM, Pacific Time (USA)
  • Free lesson on number properties

     November 23, 2018

     November 23, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Practice the one most important Quant section - Integer properties, and rapidly improve your skills.

Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 16 Jan 2013
Posts: 146
Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 08 Jun 2017, 16:47
2
23
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

38% (02:20) correct 62% (02:05) wrong based on 818 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of nuances of the languages people speak, their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices provides clues to the mental state or social status.

A. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of nuances of the languages people speaks, their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices provides clues to the mental state or social status.

B. Though we are seldom if ever aware of them, Molly Ireland argues, the nuances of one's language — such as the use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices — provide clues to one's mental state or social status.

C. Although we are never aware of the nuances, people's language — Molly Ireland argues — provide clues to their mental state or social status through the linguistic choices such as the usage of personal pronouns, articles or contractions.

D. If we are ever aware of the nuances of people's language, their usage of personal pronouns, articles and contractions, we would have understood one's mental state or social status — as argued by Molly Ireland.

E. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of it, nuances of one's language — such as its use of personal pronouns, articles as well as contractions, among few other linguistic choices — provides clues to his or her mental state or social status.

_________________

Read my posts...
What are modifiers ??


Originally posted by sivasanjeev on 28 Dec 2013, 01:17.
Last edited by broall on 08 Jun 2017, 16:47, edited 2 times in total.
Fixed typo
Most Helpful Expert Reply
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4488
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Dec 2013, 09:00
4
1
sivasanjeev wrote:
Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of nuances of the languages people speak, their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices provides clues to the mental state or social status.

Dear sivasanjeev,
I am happy to help. :-)


A. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of nuances of the languages people speak, their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices provides clues to the mental state or social status.
The parallelism of the list is faulty here --- it's unclear where the objects of the preposition "of" end and the subject of the verb "provides" begins. Furthermore, why is this very singular, if the subject appears plural. This one has fatal flaws and cannot be correct.

B. Though we are seldom if ever aware of it, Molly Ireland argues, nuances of people's language — such as their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices — provide clues to their mental state or social status.
This one offsets the list of nuances with dashes: a clever structure. Good SV agreement. Good parallelism. This one is promising. The only problem is the use of the pronoun, referring to an antecedent in the possessive. Can we use a noun in the possessive as the antecedent for a pronoun in the possessive? This is a controversial point of grammar: grammatical conservatives (myself included) would say "no," but grammatical liberals would say "yes." The GMAT SC tends to be very conservative in its choices, and I have never seen this structure as part of a correct answer on the GMAT SC. This is, in my opinion, the only un-GMAT-like aspect of this otherwise strong question.

C. Although we are never aware of the nuances, people's language — Molly Ireland argues — provide clues to their mental state or social status through the linguistic choices such as the usage of personal pronouns, articles or contractions.
What's awkward about this is --- it's now unclear what the "nuances" are, and it's unclear whether the list at the end of the sentence constitutes them. Furthermore, this one has a very roundabout structure --- "through the choice of ..." = very passive and indirect. This one is incorrect.

D. If we are ever aware of the nuances of people's language, their usage of personal pronouns, articles and contractions, we would have understood their mental state or social status — as argued by Molly Ireland.
Hmm. A logical mistake. If we aren't aware of the nuances, then we won't understand their mental state, but from there, it's a large leap to say that understanding the nuances would be enough to understand their mental state. Because of this logical leap, a change in meaning from the original, this is wrong.

E. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of it, nuances of people's language — such as its use of personal pronouns, articles as well as contractions, among few other linguistic choices — provides clues to the people's mental state or social status.
This is another logical mistake, and the mistake concerns the pronoun within the dashes. The "use of personal pronouns, etc. ..." that "provides clues" is not the general language itself, the abstract rules that everyone shares. That doesn't provide any clues about anyone. What provide clues are the way that one person makes one choice and another person makes another choice. In other words, the pronoun modifying "use" has to be the plural pronoun referring to "people". This is wrong.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

General Discussion
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 15 Jun 2012
Posts: 1028
Location: United States
Premium Member
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Dec 2013, 12:11
4
Hello Mike & sivasanjeev.

I do not agree fully with the OA. "it" in B (Though we are seldom if ever aware of it,......) refers to what? I immediately crossed out B because of an unclear pronoun. B, however, blinked as OA.....How can B is the OA? Is this a good question to practice or should we ignore it?

Please advise.

Best!
_________________

Please +1 KUDO if my post helps. Thank you.

"Designing cars consumes you; it has a hold on your spirit which is incredibly powerful. It's not something you can do part time, you have do it with all your heart and soul or you're going to get it wrong."

Chris Bangle - Former BMW Chief of Design.

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4488
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Dec 2013, 13:03
2
pqhai wrote:
Hello Mike & sivasanjeev.

I do not agree fully with the OA. "it" in B (Though we are seldom if ever aware of it,......) refers to what? I immediately crossed out B because of an unclear pronoun. B, however, blinked as OA.....How can B is the OA? Is this a good question to practice or should we ignore it?

Please advise.

Best!

Dear pqhai,
My friend, I completely agree with you. I hadn't noticed it, but that "it" is problematic --- it's not clear whether is has a proper referent in this sentence. I don't know what the source of this question is. It's very hard to write a good tight GMAT-like SC question, especially one in which the whole sentence is underlined.
Good eye for detail, my friend.
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 15 Jun 2012
Posts: 1028
Location: United States
Premium Member
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Dec 2013, 14:06
mikemcgarry wrote:
pqhai wrote:
Hello Mike & sivasanjeev.

I do not agree fully with the OA. "it" in B (Though we are seldom if ever aware of it,......) refers to what? I immediately crossed out B because of an unclear pronoun. B, however, blinked as OA.....How can B is the OA? Is this a good question to practice or should we ignore it?

Please advise.

Best!

Dear pqhai,
My friend, I completely agree with you. I hadn't noticed it, but that "it" is problematic --- it's not clear whether is has a proper referent in this sentence. I don't know what the source of this question is. It's very hard to write a good tight GMAT-like SC question, especially one in which the whole sentence is underlined.
Good eye for detail, my friend.
Mike :-)


Dear Mike.
Thank you for your clarification. :)
_________________

Please +1 KUDO if my post helps. Thank you.

"Designing cars consumes you; it has a hold on your spirit which is incredibly powerful. It's not something you can do part time, you have do it with all your heart and soul or you're going to get it wrong."

Chris Bangle - Former BMW Chief of Design.

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 16 Jan 2013
Posts: 146
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Dec 2013, 20:27
pqhai wrote:
mikemcgarry wrote:
pqhai wrote:
Hello Mike & sivasanjeev.

I do not agree fully with the OA. "it" in B (Though we are seldom if ever aware of it,......) refers to what? I immediately crossed out B because of an unclear pronoun. B, however, blinked as OA.....How can B is the OA? Is this a good question to practice or should we ignore it?

Please advise.

Best!

Dear pqhai,
My friend, I completely agree with you. I hadn't noticed it, but that "it" is problematic --- it's not clear whether is has a proper referent in this sentence. I don't know what the source of this question is. It's very hard to write a good tight GMAT-like SC question, especially one in which the whole sentence is underlined.
Good eye for detail, my friend.
Mike :-)


Dear Mike.
Thank you for your clarification. :)


Hi Mike & Pqhai,
'It' can act as a placeholder and not have any antecedent. Can it not? Like the one in the below question?
california-s-innovation-culture-and-abundance-of-engineering-165147.html
_________________

Read my posts...
What are modifiers ??

Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 15 Jun 2012
Posts: 1028
Location: United States
Premium Member
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Dec 2013, 01:03
1
sivasanjeev wrote:
Hi Mike & Pqhai,
'It' can act as a placeholder and not have any antecedent. Can it not? Like the one in the below question?
california-s-innovation-culture-and-abundance-of-engineering-165147.html


Hi sivasanjeev

Your link is about "placeholder it" and I picked D without any hesitation (of course, D is OA). But that's not the case in your question. There are three cases we can use "placeholder it": postpone infinitive subject, postpone That-clause subject and postpone infinitive or that-clause object. Option B in your question, actually, does not refer to any one of the three cases mentioned previous.

Regards,
_________________

Please +1 KUDO if my post helps. Thank you.

"Designing cars consumes you; it has a hold on your spirit which is incredibly powerful. It's not something you can do part time, you have do it with all your heart and soul or you're going to get it wrong."

Chris Bangle - Former BMW Chief of Design.

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 16 Jan 2013
Posts: 146
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Dec 2013, 01:15
1
pqhai wrote:
sivasanjeev wrote:
Hi Mike & Pqhai,
'It' can act as a placeholder and not have any antecedent. Can it not? Like the one in the below question?
california-s-innovation-culture-and-abundance-of-engineering-165147.html


Hi sivasanjeev

Your link is about "placeholder it" and I picked D without any hesitation (of course, D is OA). But that's not the case in your question. There are three cases we can use "placeholder it": postpone infinitive subject, postpone That-clause subject and postpone infinitive or that-clause object. Option B in your question, actually, does not refer to any one of the three cases mentioned previous.

Regards,


Thanks pqhai. Atleast I learnt when to use the placeholder. The question was given to me by a friend. Googling for the same, I found that the question is picked from an article from discovermagazine. Probably, this "it" refers to something from a previous sentence.

Nice catch, and I appreciate your time.
_________________

Read my posts...
What are modifiers ??

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4488
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Dec 2013, 06:59
2
sivasanjeev wrote:
pqhai wrote:
sivasanjeev wrote:
Hi Mike & Pqhai,
'It' can act as a placeholder and not have any antecedent. Can it not? Like the one in the below question?
california-s-innovation-culture-and-abundance-of-engineering-165147.html


Hi sivasanjeev

Your link is about "placeholder it" and I picked D without any hesitation (of course, D is OA). But that's not the case in your question. There are three cases we can use "placeholder it": postpone infinitive subject, postpone That-clause subject and postpone infinitive or that-clause object. Option B in your question, actually, does not refer to any one of the three cases mentioned previous.

Regards,


Thanks pqhai. Atleast I learnt when to use the placeholder. The question was given to me by a friend. Googling for the same, I found that the question is picked from an article from discovermagazine. Probably, this "it" refers to something from a previous sentence.

Nice catch, and I appreciate your time.

Dear sivasanjeev,
I see pqhai gave an excellent description of the placeholder "it." The "it" in the OA does not refer to the previous sentence: instead, it makes a simple pronoun mistake. Here's (B), the OA:
Though we are seldom if ever aware of it, Molly Ireland argues, nuances of people's language — such as their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices — provide clues to their mental state or social status.
The contrast, beginning with "though," ties the sentence together, so it acts as a self-contained whole. Of what are we not aware, according to Molly Ireland? We are not aware of the "nuances of people's language." The nuances are there, but (according to Ms. Ireland) typically we are not aware of them. We need the plural pronoun, not the singular pronoun. This version has no pronoun error:
Though we are seldom if ever aware of them, Molly Ireland argues, nuances of people's language — such as their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices — provide clues to their mental state or social status.
On the GMAT, the verb "argue" still needs a "that," so on this score, the OA sentence with the new pronoun is still not up to GMAT standards. Beware of any material from sources not adhering to the high standards of the GMAT. It's extraordinarily easy to write atrociously low quality SC practice questions, and the web is full of them. Doing low quality questions will not prepare you for the GMAT: in fact, they will confuse you. Here's a high quality SC practice question:
http://gmat.magoosh.com/questions/3586
Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 25 Apr 2012
Posts: 688
Location: India
GPA: 3.21
WE: Business Development (Other)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Dec 2013, 03:54
pqhai wrote:
sivasanjeev wrote:
Hi Mike & Pqhai,
'It' can act as a placeholder and not have any antecedent. Can it not? Like the one in the below question?
california-s-innovation-culture-and-abundance-of-engineering-165147.html


Hi sivasanjeev

Your link is about "placeholder it" and I picked D without any hesitation (of course, D is OA). But that's not the case in your question. There are three cases we can use "placeholder it": postpone infinitive subject, postpone That-clause subject and postpone infinitive or that-clause object. Option B in your question, actually, does not refer to any one of the three cases mentioned previous.

Regards,


Hello pqhai,

Can you share more information on placeholder it if you have or point to the relevant link. I did eliminate B because of no antecedent for it...


Thanks
Wounded
_________________


“If you can't fly then run, if you can't run then walk, if you can't walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.”

Current Student
User avatar
V
Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 4426
Location: India
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
GPA: 3.8
WE: Marketing (Non-Profit and Government)
#Top150 SC: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 08 Jun 2017, 16:47
1
1
Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of nuances of the languages people speak, their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices provides clues to the mental state or social status.

A. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of nuances of the languages people speaks, their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices provides clues to the mental state or social status.

B. Though we are seldom if ever aware of them, Molly Ireland argues, the nuances of one's language — such as the use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices — provide clues to one's mental state or social status.

C. Although we are never aware of the nuances, people's language — Molly Ireland argues — provide clues to their mental state or social status through the linguistic choices such as the usage of personal pronouns, articles or contractions.

D. If we are ever aware of the nuances of people's language, their usage of personal pronouns, articles and contractions, we would have understood one's mental state or social status — as argued by Molly Ireland.

E. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of it, nuances of one's language — such as its use of personal pronouns, articles as well as contractions, among few other linguistic choices — provides clues to his or her mental state or social status.
_________________

Have an MBA application Question? ASK ME ANYTHING!

My Stuff: Four Years to 760 | MBA Trends for Indian Applicants

My GMAT Resources
V30-V40: How to do it! | GMATPrep SC | GMATPrep CR | GMATPrep RC | Critical Reasoning Megathread | CR: Numbers and Statistics | CR: Weaken | CR: Strengthen | CR: Assumption | SC: Modifier | SC: Meaning | SC: SV Agreement | RC: Primary Purpose | PS/DS: Numbers and Inequalities | PS/DS: Combinatorics and Coordinates

My MBA Resources
Everything about the MBA Application | Over-Represented MBA woes | Fit Vs Rankings | Low GPA: What you can do | Letter of Recommendation: The Guide | Indian B Schools accepting GMAT score | Why MBA?

My Reviews
How I got into five schools from zero - Applicant Lab Review
Veritas Prep Live Online


Originally posted by souvik101990 on 04 Dec 2015, 08:59.
Last edited by broall on 08 Jun 2017, 16:47, edited 1 time in total.
Fixed typo
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 10 Apr 2014
Posts: 17
Location: United States
Concentration: Finance, General Management
GPA: 3.3
WE: Other (Retail Banking)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: #Top150 SC: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Dec 2015, 20:34
Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4526
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: #Top150 SC: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Dec 2015, 01:03
A. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of nuances of the languages one speaks, their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices provides clues to the mental state or social status. –plural ‘their’ refers to the singular ‘one’

B. Though we are seldom if ever aware of them, Molly Ireland argues, the nuances of one's language — such as the use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices — provide clues to one's mental state or social status. – nuances ….. provide – SV error amended; correct choice.

C. Although we are never aware of the nuances, people's language — Molly Ireland argues — provide clues to their mental state or social status through the linguistic choices such as the usage of personal pronouns, articles or contractions. – ‘language’….provide – SV error.

D. If we are ever aware of the nuances of people's language, their usage of personal pronouns, articles and contractions, we would have understood one's mental state or social status — as argued by Molly Ireland.--- the possessive pronoun ‘one’s’ has no referent.

E. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of it, nuances of one's language — such as its use of personal pronouns, articles as well as contractions, among few other linguistic choices — provides clues to his or her mental state or social status. --- ‘Nuances …provides’--- SV error.

_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Status: Always try to face your worst fear because nothing GOOD comes easy. You must be UNCOMFORTABLE to get to your COMFORT ZONE
Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Posts: 291
Concentration: Marketing, Technology
GMAT 1: 570 Q44 V25
GMAT 2: 600 Q48 V25
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Mar 2016, 09:09
WoundedTiger wrote:
pqhai wrote:
sivasanjeev wrote:
Hi Mike & Pqhai,
'It' can act as a placeholder and not have any antecedent. Can it not? Like the one in the below question?
california-s-innovation-culture-and-abundance-of-engineering-165147.html


Hi sivasanjeev

Your link is about "placeholder it" and I picked D without any hesitation (of course, D is OA). But that's not the case in your question. There are three cases we can use "placeholder it": postpone infinitive subject, postpone That-clause subject and postpone infinitive or that-clause object. Option B in your question, actually, does not refer to any one of the three cases mentioned previous.

Regards,


Hello pqhai,

Can you share more information on placeholder it if you have or point to the relevant link. I did eliminate B because of no antecedent for it...


Thanks
Wounded


1. Postpone infinitive subjects
It is futile to resist temptation.

2. Postpone That-clause subjects
It gave us encouragement that we scored at all.

3. Postpone infinitive or That-clause objects

She made it possible for us to attend the movie.
She made possible our attendance at the movie.
She made our attendance at the movie possible.
_________________

"When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you’ll be successful.” - Eric Thomas

I need to work on timing badly!!

Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: The best is yet to come.....
Joined: 10 Mar 2013
Posts: 506
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: #Top150 SC: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jun 2017, 10:43
daagh wrote:
A. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of nuances of the languages one speaks, their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices provides clues to the mental state or social status. –plural ‘their’ refers to the singular ‘one’

B. Though we are seldom if ever aware of them, Molly Ireland argues, the nuances of one's language — such as the use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices — provide clues to one's mental state or social status. – nuances ….. provide – SV error amended; correct choice.

C. Although we are never aware of the nuances, people's language — Molly Ireland argues — provide clues to their mental state or social status through the linguistic choices such as the usage of personal pronouns, articles or contractions. – ‘language’….provide – SV error.

D. If we are ever aware of the nuances of people's language, their usage of personal pronouns, articles and contractions, we would have understood one's mental state or social status — as argued by Molly Ireland.--- the possessive pronoun ‘one’s’ has no referent.

E. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of it, nuances of one's language — such as its use of personal pronouns, articles as well as contractions, among few other linguistic choices — provides clues to his or her mental state or social status. --- ‘Nuances …provides’--- SV error.


In b, what does possesive pronoun one's refer? Moreover, it introduces a condition which was not present in question stem.

Option A is different from question stem.

Posted from my mobile device
_________________

Hasan Mahmud

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 269
Location: Viet Nam
Concentration: Finance, Economics
GMAT 1: 730 Q51 V36
GPA: 3.56
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jun 2017, 00:31
Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of nuances of the languages people speak, their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices provides clues to the mental state or social status.

A. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of nuances of the languages people speaks, their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices provides clues to the mental state or social status.

B. Though we are seldom if ever aware of them, Molly Ireland argues, the nuances of one's language — such as the use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices — provide clues to one's mental state or social status.
--> correct.

C. Although we are never aware of the nuances, people's language — Molly Ireland argues — provide clues to their mental state or social status through the linguistic choices such as the usage of personal pronouns, articles or contractions.

D. If we are ever aware of the nuances of people's language, their usage of personal pronouns, articles and contractions, we would have understood one's mental state or social status — as argued by Molly Ireland.

E. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of it, nuances of one's language — such as its use of personal pronouns, articles as well as contractions, among few other linguistic choices — provides clues to his or her mental state or social status.
_________________

Do not pray for an easy life, pray for the strength to endure a difficult one - Bruce Lee

Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4526
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Jun 2017, 23:53
Top Contributor
Mahmud6 wrote
Quote:
In b, what does possesive pronoun one's refer? Moreover, it introduces a condition which was not present in question stem.


As far as I see, 'if ever' in B is just a filler without conveying any sense of a conditional. It does not impact the sentence in any manner.


'One's' refers to a person's -- one is an indefinite and unspecified pronoun in this context. 'One's' does not refer to possessive form of the cardinal number 'one'

Option A is different from question stem. -- I agree.
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 01 Jun 2015
Posts: 219
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, International Business
GMAT 1: 620 Q48 V26
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Jun 2017, 07:51
daagh wrote:
A. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of nuances of the languages one speaks, their use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices provides clues to the mental state or social status. –plural ‘their’ refers to the singular ‘one’

B. Though we are seldom if ever aware of them, Molly Ireland argues, the nuances of one's language — such as the use of personal pronouns, articles or contractions, among many other linguistic choices — provide clues to one's mental state or social status. – nuances ….. provide – SV error amended; correct choice.

C. Although we are never aware of the nuances, people's language — Molly Ireland argues — provide clues to their mental state or social status through the linguistic choices such as the usage of personal pronouns, articles or contractions. – ‘language’….provide – SV error.

D. If we are ever aware of the nuances of people's language, their usage of personal pronouns, articles and contractions, we would have understood one's mental state or social status — as argued by Molly Ireland.--- the possessive pronoun ‘one’s’ has no referent.

E. Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of it, nuances of one's language — such as its use of personal pronouns, articles as well as contractions, among few other linguistic choices — provides clues to his or her mental state or social status. --- ‘Nuances …provides’--- SV error.


Sir,

In B,what "them" is refferring to? to nuances or to linguistic choices....
Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4526
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Jun 2017, 08:08
Top Contributor
Techie
Certainly to nuances. That one may not be aware of the fine points of one's language is reasonable. However, to say that one does not even know the use of personal pronouns, articles, or contractions is illogical. Then, how can he or she deal with so much of that language?
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 10 Apr 2018
Posts: 5
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Jul 2018, 12:31
B Correct -
A-nuances of the languages people speaks
SPEAKS is wrong.
B-correct

C-people's language — Molly Ireland argues — provide
SV issue
should be provides
D-weird sounding to me= if we are ever aware"
E-nuances of one's language — such as its use of personal pronouns
ITS use? its refers to language's use rather than people's usage of the language.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of &nbs [#permalink] 24 Jul 2018, 12:31
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Molly Ireland argues that though we are seldom aware of

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.