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Nanyang MBA Admissions and Related Blogs

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Could Facebook stop you getting hired? [#permalink]

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New post 31 Oct 2017, 03:00
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FROM Nanyang Admissions Blog: Could Facebook stop you getting hired?
In partnership with Michael Page.

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The web now plays a huge role in the recruitment process for both employers and for candidates. With the increasing prevalence of online CV searches, digital portfolios and online job boards, the recruitment process has firmly shifted into the online domain.

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While the internet offers increased visibility and ease of application, it can also come with some risks for unsuspecting job seekers. Most hiring managers and recruiters will routinely carry out an internet search on anyone they might be interested in interviewing, and though many people actively monitor their online presence and are conscientious with their privacy settings, others are much more lax when it comes to their online footprint. Many forget that it’s not just their friends, but also professional contacts who will be looking them up online.

The risks of social media

Most people act differently on the weekends, compared to their Monday to Friday office persona, and in days gone by it was easier to separate your work life from your personal life. But with your personal life now far more searchable online, your behaviour when you’re off the clock can land you in hot water with an employer, or even prevent potential future employers from contacting you for an interview.

While it’s of course completely acceptable to let your hair down when you’re not working, the pictures you post and words you use on Facebook may draw a different picture out of context. In other words, you might think you’re simply posting a few photos of a good night out with friends, but a potential employee who only has limited access to your Facebook account could draw a different conclusion about your reliability.

What are recruiters looking for online?

In their search for the perfect candidate, it’s not surprising that many employers will turn to the internet for help in sourcing and researching candidates. They’ll not only be searching for a CV that fits their particular criteria, but they’ll also want to find a person who fits well with the outlook and the values of their organisation.

This is where your online interactions could let you down and sound alarm bells for a potential employer. No matter how strong your CV is, if an employer finds your online presence inappropriate or offensive, you could be jeopardising your chances of landing the role or even getting an interview. As people continue to record their lives on social networks, it’s very wise to adopt a considered and cautious approach to your online posting – especially when seeking work.

Bolster your security online

To keep your personal life personal, make sure you regularly review your settings on Facebook so that your posts are only visible to friends, and be careful of who you accept as a friend or follower.

It may help to log out of your accounts and run a search for yourself online – you might be surprised to see what comes up. Put yourself in the shoes of a recruiter or hiring manager and think critically about what you find. If it’s anything that would make you question reliability, commitment, professionalism or any other quality you’d want in a new hire, up your security or delete the post.

To check and upgrade your security settings, select the down arrow at the top right of your profile and click on Settings. From there, go through the Privacy, Timeline and Tagging, Blocking and Public Posts tabs to review and tighten your security.

Be selective with your posts

Monitor the photos and other updates you share, particularly on Facebook, as you don’t want photos that could be misunderstood, that might put off a potential employer, or that might reflect badly on an employer, to be findable online. Don’t forget that you can adjust the privacy settings of individual posts on Facebook, so you can make some things viewable only to select people, or if there’s something you want to be visible to everyone, such as a charity fundraiser, you can also make that public (but remember to return your settings to private once the post is uploaded).

You can also adjust your Facebook settings so that you have to approve any photo that anyone else tags you in – that way, you’re in the driver’s seat. Remember, without context, it will be easy for someone who has never met you or who only knows you from a CV to make fast – and negative – judgment calls.

Keep the personal and professional separate

It is wise to keep professional networks, such as LinkedIn, for career-related activity only and not link them up with your personal, more social accounts, such as Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. LinkedIn is designed for professional networking, so casual or personal updates and comments are best kept to a minimum.

You can even go a few steps further by creating a ‘professional’ Facebook account, keeping your personal account separate and harder to find by using a different name – for example, a nickname, your first name with your middle name, or a different surname.

Use language carefully

Though it may be tempting to vent frustrations online, avoid bad-mouthing fellow colleagues, your current/ex-boss or the company you work for. Of course, everyone needs to let off steam once in a while, but an outburst on the web may not be the best option.

Any employer would be wary of someone who airs their work frustrations in this way and you can never be completely sure of who’ll see your posting (via friends of friends, screenshots, and so on).

It goes without saying that foul language, inappropriate remarks or insults that are visible online will not put you in the best light – and remember, what you put online, even if it’s well hidden or later deleted, never really goes away.

For more tips on preparing for a meeting with a new potential employee, read our advice on how to make amemorable first impression in a job interview.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Sawadee Khrup, Ah Loy Thai [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2017, 01:00
FROM Nanyang Admissions Blog: Sawadee Khrup, Ah Loy Thai
Article contributed by Leo Tan, Food and Tours Club Co-Chair

It was just like any other Sunday afternoon in Singapore – hot, humid and crowded. People whisked past us quickly at Bugis station. A small group of us were gathered in front of Guardian pharmacy just outside of the station’s gantry while a few others texted me to inform that they’ll be meeting us at the destination itself.

The anticipation was infectious. This was the Food and Tours club’s third outing. Expectations were high, and they had to be met. I could just tell from the glint in their eyes. “These people came hungry and ready!” I thought. Some skipped breakfast, while others were already discussing about their eating strategies for the meal later. The atmosphere was intense to say the least.

At 12pm sharp, my trusty co-chair and I led these hungry souls to the highlight of the day – Ah Loy Thai restaurant. Not far, it was just a short 5mins walk away from Bugis station if one were to talk the underpass. A well-known restaurant among locals for their authentic Thai food, Ah Loy Thai was previously located at Shaw Towers before relocating to their current spot at 9 Tan Quee Lan Street.

We paused for a little while outside the restaurant as a few others started to arrive. The group was sizeable, but still manageable. It was time to head in.

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You know for sure that you’re stepping into a Thai restaurant when what greets you is that familiar concoction of smells coming from lemongrass, Phad Thai and Tom Yam Soup. The group was super excited, and everyone quickly scurried to their seats. Our Thai classmates were over the moon as they grabbed and started speed-reading through the menu, picking out their favorite dishes as quickly as they can spot them.

Chao Yang and I were trying to get everyone settled down as quickly as possible. More people arrived, and our German classmate Katjya even brought her parents along! “We are going to do this right!” I decided with confidence and determination.

Once everyone was seated, Chao Yang and I started to take orders. We had to order the customary dishes of course. Phad Thai, Tom Yum Soup and Thai Pandan Chicken were obligatory, no questions asked. We topped up with several other dishes too such as Thai Mango Salad, Fried Calamari, Fried Kangkong, Thai Green Curry, Thai “Lemon Grass” Steamed Fish and Thai Milk Tea.

 

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The orders were quickly compiled and Chao Yang headed straight to the cashier to make payment. Then we waited.

The turnout was incredible. We had a total of 25 attendees that day comprising of fellow course mates, girlfriends, wives and even parents. Everyone there was bonded by their love for food, or more specifically – Thai food. Conversations flowed and drinks were served while everybody waited patiently. The air-conditioning in the restaurant was also a good respite from the blistering Singapore heat outside.

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As the Thai Mango Salad arrived, forks and spoons down the table were readied for the dig in. And then came the Pandan Chicken. And then the Fried Kangkong. And thereafter, dish after dish came to the table furiously at such incredible speeds that we needed to tell the staff to slowdown.

The table went silent. Phones were whipped out of their pockets and people were intensely focused on getting that perfect Instagram shot. Others were waiting impatiently with forks and spoons in hand for that perfect Instagram shot to be taken. “The food war is about to commence,” I thought to myself, in a light-hearted way of course.

You know you did something right when the table goes silent and everyone concentrates on the food on the table. Down the table I could see the look of satisfaction and joy on everyone’s face as they ate. Some were even borderline emotional. And that feeling, was priceless.

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Within thirty minutes, the food disappeared and we had to top up. It was incredible. “Will I have enough money to feed these hungry people?” I thought. I was truly worried since the restaurant accepts only cash payment and I underestimated the insatiable appetite of my course mates. The support, though, was amazing. Even Prav, our batch’s president, stepped up to offer cash if we were really strapped. “Bro, I can chip in if there’s not enough cash. Don’t worry about it man.” Thankfully Chao Yang had some extra cash with him and we were able to prevent a crisis from happening.

The meal was rounded up with Thai Mango Sticky Rice but by then, everybody was already full (thankfully!). It was a beautiful conclusion and the consensus was that the food was good. It was another resounding success for the Food and Tours club.

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We ushered everybody out of the restaurant and back under the unforgiving Singapore heat to take the customary group shot outside of the restaurant. “Thank you everybody for coming today and I really hope you enjoyed the food. Thanks for making today’s outing another wonderful success,” I said. “Let’s all look forward to the next outing together and I hope to see everyone again then!”

Like what a close friend of mine tells me all the time, there are three universal languages in this world – music, art and food. And it’s always times like these that I am grateful for getting the chance to showcase to my course mates the incredible variety of food that we have here in the heartlands.

Till the next food outing.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Re: Nanyang MBA Admissions and Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2017, 23:13
Calling all EU Aspirants of the Nanyang MBA C'2019!

The Nanyang EU Scholarship is awarded to outstanding EU citizens applying to the full-time Nanyang MBA starting July 2018 who wish to further their understanding of doing business in Asia.

The 1st round application deadline is coming up on 14th November 2017 and I would like to invite you to apply for this scholarship. Please indicate that you would like to apply for the scholarship in the application form that you fill in for the Nanyang MBA programme.

Feel free to reach out to me at shareenjit@ntu.edu.sg for a further discussion regarding the application process and the scholarship. We could also take this opportunity to discuss your MBA aspirations and see how we can help you achieve your postgraduate dreams. Please send me your CV if you are keen and I would be happy to make recommendations based on your profile and needs.

I look forward to hearing from you.


Regards,
Shareen Kaur
shareenjit@ntu.edu.sg

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Re: Nanyang MBA Admissions and Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2017, 22:52
What do we look out for when we evaluate candidates who submit applications into the Nanyang MBA programme?

The admissions team will review all applications holistically and will look at the following 5 areas (not in order of importance) when deciding if a candidate should be shortlisted for an admissions interview.

1. Application form & Essays
Through the application form, we get to know basic information about yourself and if you meet the minimum admission requirements. There are also 3 mandatory essay questions to answer through which we find out your motivations behind embarking on an MBA programme and your leadership traits. Here, we see if you are clear in your goals and ambitions and how the MBA degree can help you achieve your goals.

There is also a voluntary question on social responsibility - this is an added boost if you are involved in CSR but do not lie if you are not. This will come out in the admissions interview.

Look out for grammatical, spelling & punctuation errors.

2. GMAT score
Aim for a competitive GMAT score to boost your application.

3. CV
Spend some time writing a well written and succinct CV. Highlight your achievements and ensure information is clear and capped to no more than 3 pages.

4. Academic transcripts
An MBA is a rigorous programme so your undergraduate transcripts can be an indicator of how you will fare in graduate school but do not despair if your undergraduate education was not the best.

5. Letters of references
Get people who have supervised you closely so they have firsthand knowledge on your leadership capabilities rather than someone who has very vague information about you and may not write a good reference letter.

Finally, if you are shortlisted for the admissions interview, ensure you are well prepared and dressed appropriately (even if it is over a video call). You will meet with a 2 member panel, usually inclusive of at least 1 faculty. The committee will be looking out for your interpersonal skills, confidence level and ability to think on the spot. It is usually a chat about your postgraduate aspirations and to see if you would be a good fit for our programme and whether our programme can help you achieve your postgraduate aspirations.

Good luck!

Regards,
Shareen

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The Nanyang PMBA experience from a participant’s perspective [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2017, 21:00
FROM Nanyang Admissions Blog: The Nanyang PMBA experience from a participant’s perspective
Article contributed by Aung Lwin Lwin, PMBA class of 2019

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I have been considering an MBA from NTU since 3 years ago.   I reckon  that an MBA will not only be a step but a leap in the pursuit of my career goals – enhancing my business knowledge in adding to stakeholders’ value   as a finance professional, and equipping  myself with the essential skills and knowledge to fulfill my ultimate aim  of managing my own organisation in the future. I wanted a programme that offers a rigourous yet structured learning experience that would bridge me closer to my goal.

After spending a few years focusing on my career I believed it was the right time to embark on an MBA and decided to join the Professional MBA programme offered by Nanyang Business School, NTU Singapore. I wanted to upgrade my skill sets, at the same time expand my network and exchange ideas with like-minded people from diverse industries and backgrounds. The alternate weekend format was ideal for me, as it allowed me to pursue my studies with minimal disruption to my career and personal commitments.

The PMBA courses are very practical and highly applicable. I am responsible for the overall financial affairs in my organisation – my current role not only includes financial reporting, tax planning, internal control, risk assessment, compliance and investor relationships, it also involves business expansion including mergers and acquisitions.  As such, I am required to be involved in business negotiations.   Prior to the “Leading People Globally” (LPG) module, I often focus on attaining a desirable outcome for my organisation, sometimes at the expense of the other organisation. However, going through the LPG class by Professors Valerie Du-Toit Low and Lim-Lum Kit-Wye greatly influenced my approach towards negotiations. The most powerful tool taught to us was “The Principled Negotiation”. The classroom discussions and study materials provided were very insightful and it stressed the importance of working towards a win-win solution that will mutually benefit both parties.

Our organisation was in the midst of negotiating a complicated business deal and we expected the success rate to be very slim. I immediately applied the principles taught and not only did we manage to close the deal smoothly, my supervisor was so impressed that he appointed me to be  in charge of the organisation’s major projects! Although I’m only a few months into the course, I am already reaping the benefits and I believe I will only gain more as I continue my journey with the programme. I am thankful to Professor Douglas Streeter Rolph, Academic Director of the Nanyang PMBA, the remarkable faculty and my cohort that have made my experience wonderful so far.

I believe that anyone who wants to be ready for today’s dynamic and ever-changing business environment should be a part of the Nanyang Professional MBA.

Visit https://www.beyondanmba.com/programme-pmba.aspx to learn more about the programme!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Mid Autumn Festival gathering [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2017, 01:00
FROM Nanyang Admissions Blog: Mid Autumn Festival gathering
Article contributed by Daryl Ong, Nanyang MBA class of 2018.

On a bright and cheery Saturday, students from all parts of the world gathered together for their latest MBA conquest, surviving case competition part #3. Through hours of grueling efforts and hard work, they have finally conquered Vijay’s toughest quest to date and needed an avenue to let their hair down.

Fortunately, the day itself falls on a very important celebrated day of the Chinese calendar that the Social and Cultural group has organised – Mid Autumn Festival .

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With the people, and the food, and the satisfaction of having food, and the comfort of the environment, the stage was set up for some cultural education. First up we have Sid to show us the history behind this festival and the folklore of the Giant Moon/

In the meantime the crowd was enticed and intuitive with the seduction of his voice and he commanded quite a large amount of attention.

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However what we didn’t expect was that the next topic actually captured the audience beyond our imagination. The culture of the wine.

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As you can see below, this really captured the audience! Especially when sample tasting was the next event that was about to happen.

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With the end of the presentation, the bulk of students were left to mingle and enjoy the event as they see fit. Some even took to the floor and play the very popular, traditional game of Mahjong!

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With the success of the event, the night eventually ended and the people, although reluctant, had to bid farewell to the newly established and severely enhanced strong ties with each other as they embark on their next journey in life! Leading People Globally starring Patrick Gibbons.

With that fact, that concludes the blog write-up of the Mid-Autumn Festival. #KThxBye
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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How to negotiate the salary you want. [#permalink]

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New post 27 Nov 2017, 22:00
FROM Nanyang Admissions Blog: How to negotiate the salary you want.
In partnership with Michael Page.

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Many people don’t realise that the salary they’re offered along with a new role isn’t necessarily the final offer, but a starting point to negotiating the salary you want. The idea of asking for a higher figure is daunting, but it’s an expected part of the hiring process.

However, to negotiate your new salary from a position of strength, preparation is crucial. You must have clear and realistic expectations of what your skills and experience are worth and be prepared to ask your potential employer for what you want – graciously.

Use the tips below to help negotiate your new salary with confidence:

Know your worth
It is critical to research what your role is worth before you begin negotiating your salary. Visit the Michael Page Salary Centre to find out the average range for your sector, location and experience. Scan similar jobs on job boards and LinkedIn, and talk to your Michael Page recruitment consultant and industry colleagues for advice on what people are earning in similar positions.

Remember that your role isn’t a ‘cost’ to the business so much as a means of creating value. What value will you bring to your role? How can you prove that you create this value? Consider your unique skillset and why it’s crucial to your new employer’s business objectives.

Research conditions
Make sure you also research the financial performance of the company, its recent staff movements and industry conditions. This will help you to better understand the company’s position and anticipate potential objections when negotiating your salary.

If you can speak to someone who works within the business already, they’ll be a great source of information. For a broader look at the industry, look to press coverage of economic drivers and outlook.

Determine your needs
Balance your research with your personal needs to determine a realistic salary range for negotiation. Decide on a figure that:

·         You need to live on

·         Allows you to save for the future or for a particular goal

·         You would be satisfied with (the minimum you would accept)

·         You would be delighted with (your ultimate goal)

The last two figures comprise the salary range for which you should aim. You should always start negotiations at the higher end to allow room for negotiation.

Watch your timing
Always wait for the potential employer to raise the topic of salary negotiation first, rather than bringing it up during the interview. If you wait until an offer has been made, you are then in the ideal position to negotiate salary when the employer has offered you the role, is hopeful of employing you and has suggested a figure first.

If you are asked about your salary expectations, tell the interviewer you would like to know more about the role first. Avoid divulging your previous salary – your new salary shouldn’t be based on a previous one but on the value that you can bring to the business. Instead, tell them what you believe you are realistically worth based on your research, skills and experience. This may be a different figure to what you were earning in your last job – one of the benefits of moving jobs is to increase your salary package beyond what’s available in your current role.

Consider other options
Think about non-pay alternatives if the opportunity to negotiate salary is limited. Good negotiators will enter a meeting with a range of options.

Support for education and training, a car allowance, more annual leave or flexible working arrangements are potential alternatives to financial incentives. The job might offer a clear promotion path or the opportunity to review pay in three to six months, so make sure you consider these alternatives as part of your salary negotiation.

Increasing your take-home pay may be your ultimate goal, but it helps to be prepared to accept a compromise.

Get the best deal
Employers respect applicants who are hard but fair negotiators. Having the confidence to negotiate well for yourself shows the employer that you could bring these skills to the role, and strengthens their belief that you would be a valuable addition to the team.

However, if the budget simply doesn’t exist to increase the package on offer, it’s important to either gracefully decline the job offer, or to accept – but not to begrudge the lower amount. If the offer doesn’t meet expectations, you should either re-evaluate your expectations or continue your job search.

 

Source from: https://goo.gl/rNmqAX  
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Suntory IT manager brews up new career in international business [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2017, 19:00
FROM Nanyang Admissions Blog: Suntory IT manager brews up new career in international business
Harutaka Ichinoki is making progress in realising his ambition to be a global business leader.

A graduate of the Nanyang Fellows MBA programme in 2012 and an executive at Suntory Beverage and Food, which produces beer and consumer goods, Ichinoki is relocating to Australia to work as the company’s senior corporate planning manager. In his new role, he will formulate and carry out corporate strategy for Suntory’s business operations Down Under. He will also analyse business performance in Australia and report his findings to headquarters in Japan.

Having worked for about seven years as a domestic IT project manager in the early part of his career at Suntory, Ichinoki wanted to change his business role.

“My ambition was to work for global business, to be a global business leader. So now I think I’m on the way to achieve my ambition,” he says.

His desire dovetailed with Suntory’s aim of becoming a global business. As such, the company would need to gather a global team of executives, gain overseas exposure, establish foreign subsidiaries, and produce a new governance structure. In Europe, Suntory acquired several companies with the goal of integrating them and setting up new systems and processes.

In 2011, Ichinoki applied for and was awarded a Suntory sponsorship to pursue MBA studies. He was the only Suntory executive awarded that year. The application process involved writing an essay on what the applicant wanted to achieve with an MBA, and several rounds of interviews.

When asked why he chose the Nanyang Fellows MBA programme instead of business schools in Europe and America that were popular with Japanese students, Ichinoki says he believed that Asia would be an attractive market for Suntory given the region’s economic growth and large populations. Personally, he liked Asia’s culture, its people and the food, having visited Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore.

In addition, Ichinoki got to know several MBA students from Nanyang Business School who were visiting Suntory on a business study mission. After talking with them, he thought the Nanyang Fellows MBA programme was attractive. He was also impressed by its connections to Waseda University in Japan, which Suntory has affiliations with.

“I thought that the connection with Waseda University was important,” Ichinoki says.

Furthermore, Suntory had hired a Frenchman with a Nanyang-Waseda double MBA. Talking to him persuaded Ichinoki of NBS’s merits.

He says his MBA studies developed his strategic thinking and analytical skills. He also learned to communicate with foreigners and better understand other cultures. Before accepting his posting to Australia, Ichinoki had worked on major projects in Britain and Indonesia, which involved business process transformation, post-merger integration and building a value chain.

Of his time at NBS, Ichinoki says he found his MBA classes “interesting and insightful”. He became good friends with his classmates and learned about the importance of diversity and cultural differences. He adds that his business study mission to China “gave me a lot of insights”.

Undoubtedly, his MBA gave him a “huge opportunity” to advance his career, having moved from the IT field into finance and business development and strategy.

“Now I have the opportunity to be located in other countries outside of Japan and work purely for local [foreign] business. So it’s a significant change from domestic IT to global business,” Ichinoki says.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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PMBA Year End Party 2017 [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2017, 19:00
FROM Nanyang Admissions Blog: PMBA Year End Party 2017
Written by Wong Woei Luen, PMBA Candidate, class of 2019

Photo Credit: Gan Pee Wei Keat, PMBA Candidate, Class of 2019

MBA students are “jack of all trades”                     —- (1)

“All work and no play makes Jack a dull Boy”.    —-(2)

Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.

Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.

BOTH statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question asked, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked.

EACH statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked.

Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question asked, and additional data specific to the problem are need

Answer: (C). Reason? You can count on the PMBA students when it comes to having fun! (Pun intended)

After half a year of intense studying while managing our work and family, the inaugural Nanyang Professional MBA class of 2019 organized a year end party last Saturday (25th Nov 2017) at one our classmates’ house to bond, wind down and recharge before the start of new term in January 2018. The night was filled with fun and laughter for the whole night (literally).

The food menu for the night was Roti Prata buffet from the famous Springleaf Prata, as many of our foreign friends have not tried this famous Singaporean supper delicacy. The chef prepared the prata, the way you want it. Imagine mixing the fresh and crispy prata, with traditional Indian curry…. it was heavenly! Who could resist such savory and calories? I decided to leave dieting to other days. You can guess what came next.

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Our Chef making the prata fresh
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What is a party without booze? As mentioned earlier, you can certainly count on the MBA student to be creative and fun even when it comes to drinking. It was Men VS Women in a game of Beer Pong! The Team Captain of the Men’s team was Prof Lewis Lim while the ladies team had Yvonne at the helm. Despite being the minority in the class, the ladies displayed their unity and girl power and dominated the gentlemen by 3-0. The MVP award went to Yvonne as she made most of the gentlemen chugg all the beer by throwing in the ping-pong ball into the cups of the opposite side.

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Since it was near the festive season, the party committee decided to have a gift exchange session but with a twist. Everyone was supposed to buy an item with a minimum value of $10 and we could either choose from the pool or snatch from other people. It was a game of strategy and risk. The hottest item was a Gold Coin from Chow Tai Fook as one of our classmate is working at Chow Tai Fook. Wei Keat was the final owner of the Gold Coin. “No! My Precious!! …. I lamented like Gollum. (Watch the Video to find out more as it happened)

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Oh, and did I forget to mention? Some of us gamely accepted the challenge to dress in cultural costumes… that is right! As we came from various parts of the world, it was interesting to see different cultural dresses.

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4From Left to Right: Class Rep Ritesh, Home Owner Veron, Our Academic Director Dr Douglas
All good things must come to an end and happy times pass quickly. Soon it was time to say goodbye to a night of fun. I must say, through this experience, I have formed closer connection with my classmates and this will forever be an unforgettable experience in my life.  I believe this is so, for the rest of the class too.

Some additional quote from the participants:

Associate Prof Lewis:

“Thanks to Veron the host and the organizing committee, I had a great time catching up with everyone at the party. It was a very nice party to end the year with. Playing pong beer was an unforgettable experience, and the tequila shots afterwards did not affect my fond memories of the event. I wish everyone a joyous Christmas season ahead and a splendid countdown to year 2018!

Dr. Joeri Coppens (PMBA Candidate, Class of 2019, Year End Party Organising Committee):

“The year-end party was a great success. You could tell how, after five months of intense work together, we have evolved from a group of MBA classmates to friends.  The atmosphere at the party was therefore very relaxed, lively and entertaining. It was great to see everyone outside of the usual MBA class environment having fun together. I am already looking forward to our next party!”

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How to maintain a work life balance [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2017, 20:00
FROM Nanyang Admissions Blog: How to maintain a work life balance
In partnership with

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It is important to have a balance between your job and the other areas of your life so you can be productive, healthy and happy both at work and outside of it. To achieve this balance, plan your day around the most important projects, take regular breaks and make use of your annual work leave to successfully strike a balance between your job and the other areas of your life.

Prioritise your work tasks
It is important to determine the most urgent tasks for the day and allocate sufficient time to complete them. If you are unsure about what requires your direct attention, ask your manager for some advice and assistance. Other responsibilities that are not a high priority can be scheduled for a later date or delegated to another colleague. This will help keep you on top of your workload and limit the amount of hours that you spend at work.

Structure time at work
Once you have defined your priorities, structure your day around them. By grouping similar tasks together you can be more efficient in completing all your daily jobs. You will then be able to complete high priority tasks first, medium priority tasks next and so on. This will give you the freedom to allocate breaks during the day, once a segment of work is complete, as well as ensure you can comfortably meet deadlines for various activities.

Take breaks
You should take some personal time during the day for activities that are not related to your job. By taking your lunch break, you can go for a run or engage with colleagues on a social level. Also consider taking shorter breaks throughout the day to run personal errands if you don’t have the time to do them before or after work. This will allow you to achieve goals outside of your career, as well as daily jobs during the work day.

Make use of annual holidays
If you are unable to make time for yourself during the day, consider going on extended leave. You may take time for your hobbies, an overseas holiday or Christmas. Taking this time away from work allows you to dedicate it to your interests and spend some time relaxing and unwinding.

Source from: https://goo.gl/jVAfuE 
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Clean Technology & Energy business club [#permalink]

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New post 06 Dec 2017, 22:00
FROM Nanyang Admissions Blog: Clean Technology & Energy business club
Article contributed by Santiago, MBA class of 2018.

WHAT DOES “CLEAN” MEAN

When looking at clean technology and energy we always think first of renewable energies, such as wind and solar, or at low impact replacements to common technology, such as e-ink. But does a diminution in our carbon footprint also classify as “clean”? Right now, the Singaporean government is looking to reduce the consumption in energy while keeping the current economic benefit; That is, to have the same benefit with less resource consumption. This is where the NEEC comes into play, inviting companies to think about all the unintentional energy wasteful practices being carried out nowadays.

Luckily, there is no lack of interest in Singapore to reduce resource consumption. Companies such as MaxSteel, Lumoni, ETC Group, Teale, PCS and LKH attended the conference to showcase how efficiency can lower the carbon footprint of economic growth.

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On the other side, however, it is still interesting to consider what happens to the inevitable waste from our industrial ability. Well, in that front SCELSE is developing technologies to harvest valuable ray materials, such as hydrogen and pure phosphorus, when treating waste waters for being recycled or discarded with minimal ambient impact.

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From the above examples it can be concluded that those technologies that reduce our carbon footprint or reduce the final amount of waste generated should be considered as clean technologies that will disrupt the way we consume or utilize resources in the future.
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Clean Technology & Energy business club   [#permalink] 06 Dec 2017, 22:00

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