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None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style

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None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style actually stood on the prairie, though the drawings in the 1910 Wasmuth edition of his work shows the buildings in the vast spaces of an imaginary Wild West.

A. work shows the buildings
B. work shows that the buildings were
C. works show the buildings
D. works show the buildings as being
E. works show the buildings to have been


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 76: Sentence Correction


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Please help explain why D incorrect.

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Please kudos me if this helps. Thank you.

Originally posted by johng2016 on 15 Apr 2016, 03:40.
Last edited by Bunuel on 05 Nov 2018, 08:54, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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QOTD: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2017, 21:59
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In keeping with some of the themes in our beginner’s guide to SC, this is yet another question that plays around with meaning. If you try to get too mechanical, this one will bite you in the butt.

Quote:
A. work shows the buildings

One of my best students just got punked by (A) a few days ago.

Superficially, the subject-verb agreement is great here: “work shows.” But it would be a mistake is to start looking for other issues. Trouble is, “work” isn’t the subject that performs the action “shows” in this sentence: the subject is actually “drawings.” So it should be “drawings… show…” (A) is out.

Quote:
B. work shows that the buildings were

(B) is easy to eliminate for the same reason as (A). If you saw this on an actual exam, you should cross it out and move on.

But there’s more going on here! If we think strictly and literally about the meaning of this sentence, it doesn’t quite work: “the drawings… show that the buildings were in the vast spaces of an imaginary Wild West.” Literally, it sounds like the drawings are somehow proving that those buildings were actually in the vast spaces of the Wild West, and that’s obviously ridiculous. Hold onto that thought – more of this sort of thing is coming in a moment.

Quote:
C. works show the buildings

This looks fine. Subject-verb is good, and we don’t have that goofy bit of “certainty” that appears in (B) (“shows that the buildings were in… the Wild West”). The meaning is OK in (C): the drawings show the buildings in an imaginary Wild West, but without suggesting that the buildings were actually in the Wild West. Keep (C).

Quote:
D. works show the buildings as being

If you want to play the “being sounds funny!” card here, that’s OK, I guess. But the stronger reason to eliminate (D) comes down to meaning again: literally, (D) seems to imply that the drawings somehow show that the buildings were actually in the Wild West, and that’s ridiculous. And at the very least, there’s no reason for the extra words here. (D) is out.

Quote:
E. works show the buildings to have been

The exact same logic we used in (D) applies to (E), except that (E) uses the nicer-sounding “to have been” instead of “as being.” But it’s still wrong, even if it sounds nicer. (And we don’t care about sound, anyway.) So (E) is out, and (C) is correct.
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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2016, 00:40
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johng2016 wrote:
None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style actually stood on the prairie, though the drawings in the 1910 Wasmuth edition of his work shows the buildings in the vast spaces of an imaginary Wild West.

A. work shows the buildings
B. work shows that the buildings were
C. works show the buildings
D. works show the buildings as being
E. works show the buildings to have been


Please help explain why D incorrect.


The subject here is the drawings, which is plural and it should take the plural verb show.
A and B are out because of SVA error.
The statement talks about the past 1910 thus the usage of present perfect have been is incorrect.
Anand in his earlier post has already explained why D is incorrect that leaves us with option C
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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Apr 2016, 07:33
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johnnguyen2016 wrote:
None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style actually stood on the prairie, though the drawings in the 1910 Wasmuth edition of his work shows the buildings in the vast spaces of an imaginary Wild West.

A. work shows the buildings
B. work shows that the buildings were
C. works show the buildings
D. works show the buildings as being
E. works show the buildings to have been


Please help explain why D incorrect.


In GMAT the usage of 'being' is usually considered redundant or usually replaced with simple present verb.

As explained in this article https://e-gmat.com/blog/gmat-verbal/sen ... -questions
'being' is usually used under two conditions
1. as a noun
-> Being an early riser helps to get more things done
2. passive continuous verb tense
-> The goods are being loaded into the truck as we speak

However, in option D the usage of 'as being' doesn't perform any of the above role.

In option C, the meaning is more clear-> 'He didn't build houses on the prairie. However, drawings on his work show buildings in places with prairies.'
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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2016, 23:12
Why is E incorrect? Could someone explain? I am confused between C and E.
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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2016, 00:54
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SupriyaS wrote:
Why is E incorrect? Could someone explain? I am confused between C and E.


'have been' is present perfect progressive - this usage indicates an action which began in past and continues to be true in the present and might continue into the future.

The issue with option 'E' is that the present perfect progressive tense is used to refer to the fact that the 'drawings show the buildings in the vast spaces' - this is more of a fact than a real action -> hence, the simple present tense usage (as in option C).
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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2016, 02:13
SupriyaS wrote:
Why is E incorrect? Could someone explain? I am confused between C and E.


anandkumar88 wrote:
SupriyaS wrote:
Why is E incorrect? Could someone explain? I am confused between C and E.


'have been' is present perfect progressive - this usage indicates an action which began in past and continues to be true in the present and might continue into the future.

The issue with option 'E' is that the present perfect progressive tense is used to refer to the fact that the 'drawings show the buildings in the vast spaces' - this is more of a fact than a real action -> hence, the simple present tense usage (as in option C).


The analysis of Anandkumar is correct except that the tense is present perfect, not present perfect progressive. Nonetheless the reason mentioned is logical.
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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2016, 14:06
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Hi sayantanc2k,

Please have a look on OG 12 , SC Q73
________________________________________________________
Combining enormous physical strength with higher
intelligence, the Neanderthals appear as equipped for
facing any obstacle the environment could put in their
path, but their relatively sudden disappearance during
the Paleolithic era indicates that an inability to adapt
to some environmental change led to their extinction.

(A) appear as equipped for facing any obstacle the
environment could put in their path,

(B) appear to have been equipped to face any
obstacle the environment could put in their path,

(C) appear as equipped to face any obstacle the
environment could put in their paths,

(D) appeared as equipped to face any obstacle the
environment could put in their paths,

(E) appeared to have been equipped for facing any
obstacle the environment could put in their path,

Verb form; Diction
Because Neanderthals “disappeared,” the verb
describing their apparent abilities cannot be
present tense, so as equipped must be changed to to
have been equipped. Th e expression equipped to face
is clearer and more direct than equipped for facing.
A As equipped indicates that Neanderthals still
appear this way; equipped should be followed
by an infi nitive form instead of a
prepositional phrase.
B Correct. Th e verb tense clearly indicates
that the current evidence is about
Neanderthals in the past.
C As equipped does not indicate that
Neanderthals appeared this way in the past;
while individual Neanderthals may well
have followed different paths, this sentence
is about the single evolutionary path taken
by Neanderthals as a species.
D Present-tense appear is needed to parallel
present-tense indicates and to reinforce that
this is current evidence about Neanderthals
in the past; as in C, paths should be singular.
________________________________________________________

As you can see, in this correct option we use present perfect tense "to have been" for Neanderthals. (But Neanderthals became extinct a way back)

If we are making some conclusion AT PRESENT on PAST things than we need to use "to have been"

Therefore, according to me the usage of "to have been" in option E should not be wrong because its present-perfect tense.
Actually, I opted for E but its incorrect.

May be its incorrect because it is wordy.

Whats your opinion.

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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2016, 14:56
PrakharGMAT wrote:
Hi sayantanc2k,

Please have a look on OG 12 , SC Q73
________________________________________________________
Combining enormous physical strength with higher
intelligence, the Neanderthals appear as equipped for
facing any obstacle the environment could put in their
path, but their relatively sudden disappearance during
the Paleolithic era indicates that an inability to adapt
to some environmental change led to their extinction.

(A) appear as equipped for facing any obstacle the
environment could put in their path,

(B) appear to have been equipped to face any
obstacle the environment could put in their path,

(C) appear as equipped to face any obstacle the
environment could put in their paths,

(D) appeared as equipped to face any obstacle the
environment could put in their paths,

(E) appeared to have been equipped for facing any
obstacle the environment could put in their path,

Verb form; Diction
Because Neanderthals “disappeared,” the verb
describing their apparent abilities cannot be
present tense, so as equipped must be changed to to
have been equipped. Th e expression equipped to face
is clearer and more direct than equipped for facing.
A As equipped indicates that Neanderthals still
appear this way; equipped should be followed
by an infi nitive form instead of a
prepositional phrase.
B Correct. Th e verb tense clearly indicates
that the current evidence is about
Neanderthals in the past.
C As equipped does not indicate that
Neanderthals appeared this way in the past;
while individual Neanderthals may well
have followed different paths, this sentence
is about the single evolutionary path taken
by Neanderthals as a species.
D Present-tense appear is needed to parallel
present-tense indicates and to reinforce that
this is current evidence about Neanderthals
in the past; as in C, paths should be singular.
________________________________________________________

As you can see, in this correct option we use present perfect tense "to have been" for Neanderthals. (But Neanderthals became extinct a way back)

If we are making some conclusion AT PRESENT on PAST things than we need to use "to have been"

Therefore, according to me the usage of "to have been" in option E should not be wrong because its present-perfect tense.
Actually, I opted for E but its incorrect.

May be its incorrect because it is wordy.

Whats your opinion.

Thanks


Thank you for pointing out. Yes, I agree with you. While analysing the explanation of anandkumar88, I missed out that the perfect tense occurs within an infinitive. Such constructions, to+participle, are called perfect infinitives and have the peculiarity that they can be used to depict past as well as future event:

1. To depict a past event: Neanderthals appear to have been equipped to face any obstacle.
2. To depict a future event: I expect to have finished my preparation by next Monday.
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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2016, 23:35
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E is wrong for meaning reasons. (I can't think of one SC choice that is wrong merely because it is wordy.) E says that the drawings show the buildings "to have been" in an imaginary place! They can't actually have been in such a place--the drawings merely depict them that way.
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Re: QOTD: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2017, 22:13
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None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style actually stood on the prairie, though the drawings in the 1910 Wasmuth edition of his work shows the buildings in the vast spaces of an imaginary Wild West.

A. work shows the buildings
B. work shows that the buildings were
C. works show the buildings
D. works show the buildings as being
E. works show the buildings to have been


If we ignore the prepositional phrase, then the subject of the dependent clause is drawings. It would need a plural verb (show) so options A and B are eliminated for S-V error (shows).

Among options C, D and E - will like to go for option C.

This is a statement or a fact. We don't need 'have been'. The drawings show them (the buildings) in a particular way.
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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2018, 11:57
GMATNinja wrote:
In keeping with some of the themes in our beginner’s guide to SC, this is yet another question that plays around with meaning. If you try to get too mechanical, this one will bite you in the butt.

Quote:
A. work shows the buildings

One of my best students just got punked by (A) a few days ago.

Superficially, the subject-verb agreement is great here: “work shows.” But it would be a mistake is to start looking for other issues. Trouble is, “work” isn’t the subject that performs the action “shows” in this sentence: the subject is actually “drawings.” So it should be “drawings… show…” (A) is out.

Quote:
B. work shows that the buildings were

(B) is easy to eliminate for the same reason as (A). If you saw this on an actual exam, you should cross it out and move on.

But there’s more going on here! If we think strictly and literally about the meaning of this sentence, it doesn’t quite work: “the drawings… show that the buildings were in the vast spaces of an imaginary Wild West.” Literally, it sounds like the drawings are somehow proving that those buildings were actually in the vast spaces of the Wild West, and that’s obviously ridiculous. Hold onto that thought – more of this sort of thing is coming in a moment.

Quote:
C. works show the buildings

This looks fine. Subject-verb is good, and we don’t have that goofy bit of “certainty” that appears in (B) (“shows that the buildings were in… the Wild West”). The meaning is OK in (C): the drawings show the buildings in an imaginary Wild West, but without suggesting that the buildings were actually in the Wild West. Keep (C).

Quote:
D. works show the buildings as being

If you want to play the “being sounds funny!” card here, that’s OK, I guess. But the stronger reason to eliminate (D) comes down to meaning again: literally, (D) seems to imply that the drawings somehow show that the buildings were actually in the Wild West, and that’s ridiculous. And at the very least, there’s no reason for the extra words here. (D) is out.

Quote:
E. works show the buildings to have been

The exact same logic we used in (D) applies to (E), except that (E) uses the nicer-sounding “to have been” instead of “as being.” But it’s still wrong, even if it sounds nicer. (And we don’t care about sound, anyway.) So (E) is out, and (C) is correct.


Hi,

I still don't undestand what you mean by D changing the meaning? Is "as being" generally incorrect form?
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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2019, 00:09
GMATNinja wrote:
In keeping with some of the themes in our beginner’s guide to SC, this is yet another question that plays around with meaning. If you try to get too mechanical, this one will bite you in the butt.

Quote:
E. works show the buildings to have been

The exact same logic we used in (D) applies to (E), except that (E) uses the nicer-sounding “to have been” instead of “as being.” But it’s still wrong, even if it sounds nicer. (And we don’t care about sound, anyway.) So (E) is out, and (C) is correct.



Hi GMATNinja ,

I know in one of my previous questions you told me not to worry about hypothetical answers, but I really just want to nail down the meaning on this one. Is it because of the word IMAGINARY that makes the meaning illogical? So if the context is not imaginary and there were actual drawings of houses in the wild west, then there wouldn't be a meaning issue here, right?

Please help, I answered E :(

Thanks.
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New post 21 Jul 2019, 05:45
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None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style actually stood on the prairie, though the drawings in the 1910 Wasmuth edition of his work shows the buildings in the vast spaces of an imaginary Wild West.

A. work shows the buildings
B. work shows that the buildings were
C. works show the buildings
D. works show the buildings as being
E. works show the buildings to have been

Let me say that an element of ellipsis has been forgotten in this question. The elided word is ' built" that is required o be placed at the beginning of the free part after the underlined part.

As such, the choices have to be understood as

A. work shows the buildings (built)
B. work shows that the buildings were(built)
C. works show the buildings(built)
D. works show the buildings as being(built)
E. works show the buildings to have been(built).

The elided word 'built' is a past participle and not a past tense verb

Now I think that the picture may be clear. Let us appreciate that in E, the infinitive ('to have been') is a verbal and therefore takes its tense from the main clause, which in the context is 'past'. One cannot envisage a scene in which FLW comes down to earth again to paint them for the future. A simple past tense for a random event would be better than an infinitive that may mislead that the FLW built them with an intention.

Yet another sore point in this question is the casual use of the word 'built' in the early part. The painter never built any house. He only drew them. People may inadvertently think he was also a builder.

That said, therefore C is the best choice.
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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2019, 07:42
johng2016 wrote:
None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style actually stood on the prairie, though the drawings in the 1910 Wasmuth edition of his work shows the buildings in the vast spaces of an imaginary Wild West.

A. work shows the buildings
B. work shows that the buildings were
C. works show the buildings
D. works show the buildings as being
E. works show the buildings to have been


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 76: Sentence Correction


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Please help explain why D incorrect.


choice d is wrong because it is not idiomatic. we have show something as+noun. we do not have "show something as doing". this is purely idiomatic

choice e is wrong logically. choice e mean:
the drawings show that the building was in spaces in the past.
this means now, the building is not in spaces.
this is absurd. the building in the past was in spaces and now are not.
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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2019, 13:43
Diwabag wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
In keeping with some of the themes in our beginner’s guide to SC, this is yet another question that plays around with meaning. If you try to get too mechanical, this one will bite you in the butt.

Quote:
E. works show the buildings to have been

The exact same logic we used in (D) applies to (E), except that (E) uses the nicer-sounding “to have been” instead of “as being.” But it’s still wrong, even if it sounds nicer. (And we don’t care about sound, anyway.) So (E) is out, and (C) is correct.



Hi GMATNinja ,

I know in one of my previous questions you told me not to worry about hypothetical answers, but I really just want to nail down the meaning on this one. Is it because of the word IMAGINARY that makes the meaning illogical? So if the context is not imaginary and there were actual drawings of houses in the wild west, then there wouldn't be a meaning issue here, right?

Please help, I answered E :(

Thanks.

I think you are on the right track here. Yes, the buildings certainly were not actually located in an imaginary Wild West.

Also, the word "though" implies a contradiction between the first part of the sentence and the second: the drawings show the buildings in the vast open spaces of an imaginary Wild West [even] THOUGH none of the houses actually stood on the prairie. Even without the word "imaginary", we can infer that the locations in the drawings do not represent the actual locations of the buildings. The word "imaginary" confirms this interpretation.

(D) and (E) seem to suggest that the drawings somehow show that the buildings were located in places where the buildings never actually stood, and that is what makes the meaning illogical.

I hope that helps!
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Re: None of the houses that Frank Lloyd Wright built in the Prairie Style   [#permalink] 27 Jul 2019, 13:43
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