It is currently 19 Apr 2018, 02:45

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

One report concludes that many schools do not have, or likely to have,

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Director
Director
User avatar
G
Joined: 26 Oct 2016
Posts: 674
Location: United States
Concentration: Marketing, International Business
Schools: HBS '19
GMAT 1: 770 Q51 V44
GPA: 4
WE: Education (Education)
Re: One report concludes that many schools do not have, or likely to have, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Aug 2017, 10:57
anje29 wrote:
LogicGuru1 wrote:
One report concludes that many schools do not have, or likely to have, enough computers to use them effectively.

Simple of coordinating conjunctions :- FANBOYS - for, and, nor, because, or, yet ,so
A Coordinating conjunction introduces 2 independent clauses.
Clauses by definition should have independent subjects. and also independent verb(although not parallel but still a verb is present in the second clause)

Therefore the problem is absence of a PROPER SUBJECT in the second clause.


Only D has the proper subject "THEY". "THEM" in the NON-Underlined part refers back to "THEY"

REST ALL OPTIONS A,B,C,E are missing the subject. "THEM" in the NON-Underlined part has no subject to refer back to.

ANSWER IS D


Hi,
Are you sure 'them' is referring to 'they' here. As per the meaning of the sentence 'them' should refer to the 'computers' .


@Anje

(A) and (B) are incorrect because of their poor parallelism. In this "or" construction, the first half is "do not have", a tensed verb. Therefore, the second half of the construction must also contain a tensed verb.
(A) and (B) don't have a tensed verb ("likely to have" contains only an infinitive - not what we want here).

(option E) contains a double negative, so it's out.

(option C) is, as far as i can tell grammatically correct (although the commas are superfluous in such a construction), but it's simply absurd. The use of "or" here creates a sentence that is weirdly self-contradictory.

The clear point of the sentence is that the schools don't have enough computers, so you need to select the choice that's grammatically correct but also in line with that meaning. (option D) is the only choice that satisfies both criteria.
_________________

Thanks & Regards,
Anaira Mitch

Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: Greatness begins beyond your comfort zone
Joined: 08 Dec 2013
Posts: 1960
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Strategy
Schools: Kelley '20, ISB '19
GPA: 3.2
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: One report concludes that many schools do not have, or likely to have, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Nov 2017, 12:46
egmat wrote:
anje29 wrote:
LogicGuru1 wrote:
One report concludes that many schools do not have, or likely to have, enough computers to use them effectively.

Simple of coordinating conjunctions :- FANBOYS - for, and, nor, because, or, yet ,so
A Coordinating conjunction introduces 2 independent clauses.
Clauses by definition should have independent subjects. and also independent verb(although not parallel but still a verb is present in the second clause)

Therefore the problem is absence of a PROPER SUBJECT in the second clause.


Only D has the proper subject "THEY". "THEM" in the NON-Underlined part refers back to "THEY"

REST ALL OPTIONS A,B,C,E are missing the subject. "THEM" in the NON-Underlined part has no subject to refer back to.

ANSWER IS D


Hi,
Are you sure 'them' is referring to 'they' here. As per the meaning of the sentence 'them' should refer to the 'computers' .



Hello anje29,

I will glad to answer this one.

The plural pronoun them in the non-underlined portion of the sentence refers to plural computers and not to many schools.

It is the computers that are not used effectively.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha


GMATNinja , RonPurewal , sayantanc2k ,mikemcgarry ,daagh ,egmat ,EMPOWERgmatRichC ,AjiteshArun ,ChiranjeevSingh -- is it okay to have plural pronouns refer to two different antecedents?
_________________

When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it. - Henry Ford
The Moment You Think About Giving Up, Think Of The Reason Why You Held On So Long
+1 Kudos if you find this post helpful

Expert Post
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
S
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 2499
Re: One report concludes that many schools do not have, or likely to have, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Nov 2017, 15:45
Skywalker18 wrote:

GMATNinja , RonPurewal , sayantanc2k ,mikemcgarry ,daagh ,egmat ,EMPOWERgmatRichC ,AjiteshArun ,ChiranjeevSingh -- is it okay to have plural pronouns refer to two different antecedents?



Hello Skywalker18,

I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)


A pronoun must have a just one logical antecedent in the sentence.

If a sentence uses multiple pronouns, all of them must have clear logical antecedents.

It is absolutely okay to use two plural pronouns that CLEARLY refer to their respective plural noun antecedents. After all, we have this usage in the correct answer choice of an official sentence. So this usage is absolutely acceptable.


The only logic by which the usage of pronouns is governed is that they must have clear logical antecedents.


In the official sentence in question, the plural pronoun they logically refers only to many schools and plural pronoun them in the non-underlined portion of the sentence refers to plural computers.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________












| '4 out of Top 5' Instructors on gmatclub | 70 point improvement guarantee | www.e-gmat.com

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4675
Re: One report concludes that many schools do not have, or likely to have, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Nov 2017, 18:08
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
Skywalker18 wrote:
is it okay to have plural pronouns refer to two different antecedents?

Dear Skywalker18,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

With all due respect to Shraddha, I will disagree. I will say that, under certain circumstance, it is 100% fine for a single plural pronoun to refer to two different antecedents.
1) John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were bitter political rivals at the beginning of the nineteenth century, but they became the dearest of friends in their old age.
That sentence is 100% correct, and the pronoun "they" clear refers to the two subject nouns in parallel. This would be the most common case: if two single nouns are in parallel, right next to each other, this setup makes it very easy to include them together in a single pronoun.

It's possible, though, that the two nouns would be separated or in different roles. If the two nouns are separate, the pronoun "they" is often followed by the word "both" for clarity.
2) Diamond is the hardest substance in the natural world while graphite is so soft that it's smearable, and yet they both are forms of the element carbon.
3) T.S. Eliot was as much a staunch conservative as e e cummings was a non-conformist liberal, but they both broke substantial new ground in the modernist expansion of the poetic canon.
Both of those sentences are 100% correct. Both of these are of the general logical form "P and Q are different but they're also similar." The grammatical construction of #3 is particularly sophisticated, but it's 100% correct.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Expert Post
GMAT Tutor
User avatar
B
Joined: 15 Nov 2013
Posts: 59
Re: One report concludes that many schools do not have, or likely to have, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Dec 2017, 02:17
Skywalker18 wrote:
-- is it okay to have plural pronouns refer to two different antecedents?


^^ this is an official problem. if something happens in the correct answer to an official problem, then ... well ... you have your answer to "is it okay?".
EVERYTHING in OFFICIALLY correct sentences is correct and acceptable!

__

in fact — in the problem at hand here, these two pronouns MUST refer to different things.
"they" is a subject, and "them" is an object in the same clause / part of the sentence. if both of these were intended to refer to the same noun, then they'd have to be "they" and "themselves", not just "they" and "them".
_________________

Please visit my corners of the web:
http://www.RonPurewal.com
http://www.facebook.com/RonPurewalGMAT
__

Pueden hacerle preguntas a Ron en castellano
Potete fare domande a Ron in italiano
On peut poser des questions à Ron en français
Voit esittää kysymyksiä Ron:lle myös suomeksi
__

Un bon vêtement, c'est un passeport pour le bonheur.
—Yves Saint-Laurent

Expert Post
Verbal Expert
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3226
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
One report concludes that many schools do not have, or likely to have, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Dec 2017, 08:34
Skywalker18 wrote:


GMATNinja , RonPurewal , sayantanc2k ,mikemcgarry ,daagh ,egmat ,EMPOWERgmatRichC ,AjiteshArun ,ChiranjeevSingh -- is it okay to have plural pronouns refer to two different antecedents?


In general no because a pronoun ambiguity would arise, but in case the subject and object are "they" and "them" (as in this case), such ambiguity does not arise, since if the object referred to the same antecedent, it would be the reflexive form "themsleves" rather than "them".
One report concludes that many schools do not have, or likely to have,   [#permalink] 07 Dec 2017, 08:34

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 26 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

One report concludes that many schools do not have, or likely to have,

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.