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Pedigreed dogs, including those officially classified as working dogs

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Pedigreed dogs, including those officially classified as working dogs [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2017, 00:01
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Question Stats:

52% (01:25) correct 48% (01:35) wrong based on 92 sessions

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Pedigreed dogs, including those officially classified as working dogs, must conform to standards set by organizations that issue pedigrees. Those standards generally specify the physical appearance necessary for a dog to be recognized as belonging to a breed but stipulate nothing about other genetic traits, such as those that enable breeds originally developed as working dogs to perform the work for which they were developed. Since dog breeders try to maintain only those traits specified by pedigree organizations, and traits that breeders do not try to maintain risk being lost, certain traits like herding ability risk being lost among pedigreed dogs. Therefore, pedigree organizations should set standards requiring working ability in pedigreed dogs classified as working dogs.

The boldface portion plays which one of the following roles in the argument?

A. It is a claim on which the argument depends but for which no support is given.
B. It is a subsidiary conclusion used in support of the main conclusion.
C. It acknowledges a possible objection to the proposal put forth in the argument.
D. It summarizes the position that the argument as a whole is directed toward discrediting.
E. It provides evidence necessary to support a claim stated earlier in the argument.

This question was adapted from the June 1995 LSAT, Logical Reasoning, Section 2, Q #14.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by mikemcgarry on 09 Mar 2017, 11:16, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Pedigreed dogs, including those officially classified as working dogs [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2017, 16:01
BPHASDEU wrote:
Pedigreed dogs, including those officially classified as working dogs, must conform to standards set by organizations that issue pedigrees. Those standards generally specify the physical appearance necessary for a dog to be recognized as belonging to a breed but stipulate nothing about other genetic traits, such as those that enable breeds originally developed as working dogs to perform the work for which they were developed. Since dog breeders try to maintain only those traits specified by pedigree organizations, and traits that breeders do not try to maintain risk being lost, certain traits like herding ability risk being lost among pedigreed dogs. Therefore, pedigree organizations should set standards requiring working ability in pedigreed dogs classified as working dogs.

The boldface portion plays which one of the following roles in the argument?

A. It is a claim on which the argument depends but for which no support is given.
B. It is a subsidiary conclusion used in support of the main conclusion.
C. It acknowledges a possible objection to the proposal put forth in the argument.
D. It summarizes the position that the argument as a whole is directed toward discrediting.
E. It provides evidence necessary to support a claim stated earlier in the argument.

Dear BPHASDEU

I'm happy to help. :-)

I don't know the source. They have a grammar mistake in the prompt, right in the BF section:
. . . certain traits like herding ability . . .
Of course, by GMAT SC standards, this should be:
. . . certain traits such as herding ability . . .
Every once in a while, an official question makes this sort of mistake, but it is unusual that it's right in the BF section, the most highlighted part of the prompt.

This BF section is a speculation, a prediction for what may take place in the future. It is NOT evidence. It is not the main conclusion, but it supports the main conclusion.

A. It is a claim on which the argument depends but for which no support is given.
The BF section is an argument, a claim, and the conclusion does seem to depend on it to some extent, but it's extreme to say "no support" is given to it. In fact the first half of the sentence, before the BF, gives plenty of support to the BF section. This is incorrect.

B. It is a subsidiary conclusion used in support of the main conclusion.
Yes, the BF is a secondary conclusion, a subsidiary conclusion, and it does support the main conclusion. This looks promising.

C. It acknowledges a possible objection to the proposal put forth in the argument.
No, the BF supports the main conclusion. There are no objections in this argument. This is 100% wrong.

D. It summarizes the position that the argument as a whole is directed toward discrediting.
No, it is totally in line with the argument's main conclusion. It is not opposed to the argument in any way. This is 100% wrong.

E. It provides evidence necessary to support a claim stated earlier in the argument.
It is NOT evidence. It is a claim, an argument. This is incorrect.

The only possible answer is (B).

Here are a few more practice questions.
GMAT Critical Reasoning: Boldface Structure Questions

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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Re: Pedigreed dogs, including those officially classified as working dogs [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2017, 18:57
mikemcgarry wrote:
BPHASDEU wrote:
Pedigreed dogs, including those officially classified as working dogs, must conform to standards set by organizations that issue pedigrees. Those standards generally specify the physical appearance necessary for a dog to be recognized as belonging to a breed but stipulate nothing about other genetic traits, such as those that enable breeds originally developed as working dogs to perform the work for which they were developed. Since dog breeders try to maintain only those traits specified by pedigree organizations, and traits that breeders do not try to maintain risk being lost, certain traits like herding ability risk being lost among pedigreed dogs. Therefore, pedigree organizations should set standards requiring working ability in pedigreed dogs classified as working dogs.

The boldface portion plays which one of the following roles in the argument?

A. It is a claim on which the argument depends but for which no support is given.
B. It is a subsidiary conclusion used in support of the main conclusion.
C. It acknowledges a possible objection to the proposal put forth in the argument.
D. It summarizes the position that the argument as a whole is directed toward discrediting.
E. It provides evidence necessary to support a claim stated earlier in the argument.

Dear BPHASDEU

I'm happy to help. :-)

I don't know the source. They have a grammar mistake in the prompt, right in the BF section:
. . . certain traits like herding ability . . .
Of course, by GMAT SC standards, this should be:
. . . certain traits such as herding ability . . .
Every once in a while, an official question makes this sort of mistake, but it is unusual that it's right in the BF section, the most highlighted part of the prompt.

This BF section is a speculation, a prediction for what may take place in the future. It is NOT evidence. It is not the main conclusion, but it supports the main conclusion.

A. It is a claim on which the argument depends but for which no support is given.
The BF section is an argument, a claim, and the conclusion does seem to depend on it to some extent, but it's extreme to say "no support" is given to it. In fact the first half of the sentence, before the BF, gives plenty of support to the BF section. This is incorrect.

B. It is a subsidiary conclusion used in support of the main conclusion.
Yes, the BF is a secondary conclusion, a subsidiary conclusion, and it does support the main conclusion. This looks promising.

C. It acknowledges a possible objection to the proposal put forth in the argument.
No, the BF supports the main conclusion. There are no objections in this argument. This is 100% wrong.

D. It summarizes the position that the argument as a whole is directed toward discrediting.
No, it is totally in line with the argument's main conclusion. It is not opposed to the argument in any way. This is 100% wrong.

E. It provides evidence necessary to support a claim stated earlier in the argument.
It is NOT evidence. It is a claim, an argument. This is incorrect.

The only possible answer is (B).

Here are a few more practice questions.
GMAT Critical Reasoning: Boldface Structure Questions

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)




Hello Mike,


Isn't BF part an example/evidence of previous sentence '' and traits that breeders do not try to maintain risk being lost'', which is supporting the argument???.
Also, we can call ''ánd traits that breeders do not try to maintain risk being lost'' as subsidiary conclusion, rather than the example used which is ''certain traits like.....''.
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Re: Pedigreed dogs, including those officially classified as working dogs [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2017, 11:31
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anurag16589 wrote:
Hello Mike,
Isn't BF part an example/evidence of previous sentence '' and traits that breeders do not try to maintain risk being lost'', which is supporting the argument???.
Also, we can call ''and traits that breeders do not try to maintain risk being lost'' as subsidiary conclusion, rather than the example used which is ''certain traits like.....''.

Dear anurag16589,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

I hunted down the source: this is a question from a real LSAT in June 1995. No wonder there's a grammar mistake not consistent with the GMAT SC: lawyers don't have SC questions on the LSAT, so apparently they don't need to know grammar as much as do folks in the business world! :-)

I would say that, at best, it's debatable whether we could the BF clause evidence. On the GMAT SC, evidence is something definite that has happened or something definite that has been the case. Evidence is unambiguously factual in its presentation. The way this BF clause is phrased is as a kind of prediction. Perhaps this is part of a scientific pattern that has been observed for a while, in which case it definitely would be evidence, but the phrasing makes that unclear. Because this BF clause is presented as the consequence of a clause beginning with "since," it has more the feel of an argument than of evidence.

Let's say, for the sake of argument, that we could call this BF clause evidence. Then what? Clearly, (E) is still not correct--there are not claims "earlier in the argument," because everything before that sentence clearly is evidence. Even if we grant that this phrase could count as evidence, this doesn't change the answer at all.

In my view, since the BF clause is the direct consequence of a clause beginning with "since," it is the claim or conclusion of an argument. It's not the main conclusion, but it supports the main conclusion, so it's a subsidiary conclusion.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Re: Pedigreed dogs, including those officially classified as working dogs   [#permalink] 09 Mar 2017, 11:31
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