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QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's

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QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's [#permalink]

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Verbal Question of The Day: Day 111: Sentence Correction


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In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's blending of solar imagery, Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting her range and depth of influences, not the least of which is her African heritage.

(A) the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting
(B) borrowing images from ancient classicism, suggests
(C) she borrowed images from ancient classicism, which suggests
(D) images borrowed from ancient classicism suggests
(E) images that she borrowed from ancient classicism, suggesting

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QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's [#permalink]

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One key to this question is figuring out what, exactly, needs to be parallel. The underlined portion starts immediately after the parallelism trigger "and" -- so we'll focus most our energy there. (For more on parallelism -- including some examples that are much tougher than this one -- check out our YouTube webinar on parallelism and meaning.)

Quote:
(A) the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting

The parallelism in (A) gives us a list of three things: "...Wheatley's blending of solar imagery, Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and the images she borrowed..." That's reasonable enough: she blended those three things together. So I think the parallelism is OK.

Trouble is, we don't really have a legitimate sentence in (A). To have a full sentence, you need an independent clause -- basically, a subject and a verb. The subject is "blending", but there's no verb "performed" by the subject. "Suggesting" isn't a verb here, since it isn't preceded by a form of "to be." (More on "-ing" words here.) So (A) is gone.

Quote:
(B) borrowing images from ancient classicism, suggests

In (B), "and" is followed by "borrowing", so we need to find something that's parallel to "borrowing." It has to be "blending", right? Superficially, that's not bad: "...Wheatley's blending of solar imagery... and borrowing images from ancient classicism..."

But then what the heck is the phrase "Judeo-Christian thought and figures" doing here? I can't make any sense of it at all. It isn't part of a list in (B), and it doesn't logically modify "solar imagery." So on that basis alone, (B) is out.

Quote:
(C) she borrowed images from ancient classicism, which suggests

This one has all sorts of problems. For starters, there's a straightforward, classic modifier error. The phrase "which suggests her range and depth of influences" seems to modify "ancient classicism", and that makes no sense at all. You could argue that the phrase beginning with "which" modifies "images from ancient classicism", but then there's a subject-verb issue. If you're in a hurry, that's enough to wipe out (C).

But there's also a broader structural problem with the sentence. "Phyllis Wheatley's blending of solar imagery, Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and she borrowed images from ancient classicism..." Huh? The subject of the sentence is "Wheatley's blending" again, but it never actually performs a verb.

Quote:
(D) images borrowed from ancient classicism suggests

(D) seems to fix all of our problems. The parallelism works, much as it does in (A): "...Wheatley's blending of solar imagery, Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and images borrowed from ancient classicism..." That's a perfectly legit list of three different things (nouns) that she blended together. And the subject-verb agreement makes sense, too: "... Wheatley's blending [of three things] suggests her depth and range of influences..." So the subject actually has a verb that makes sense in (D). Let's keep it.

Quote:
(E) images that she borrowed from ancient classicism, suggesting

I'd be a little bit happier with (E) if it said "images borrowed from ancient classicism" instead of "images that she borrowed from ancient classicism." It just seems like a waste of words, but that's not necessarily wrong. The parallelism is basically OK: the list still consists of three parallel nouns.

The trouble is, the main subject ("Wheatley's blending") doesn't actually "perform" a verb, since "suggesting" isn't a verb here. It's the same problem as in (A). So (E) can be eliminated, and (D) is the best answer.
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Re: QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2017, 19:19
In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's blending of solar imagery, Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting her range and depth of influences, not the least of which is her African heritage.
(A) the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting Lack of verb leads to a Fragmented sentence. Hence Incorrect.
(B) borrowing images from ancient classicism, suggests
- Blending of X, Y, & Z. X & Y are NOUN, so Z should be noun as well. Parallelism is not maintained among three items. Hence Incorrect
(C) she borrowed images from ancient classicism, which suggests
- Blending of X, Y, & Z. X & Y are NOUN, so Z should be noun as well. Parallelism is not maintained among three items. Lack of verb leads to a Fragmented sentence. Incorrect use of WHICH. Hence Incorrect
(D) images borrowed from ancient classicism suggests - CORRECT
(E) images that she borrowed from ancient classicism, suggesting Lack of verb leads to a Fragmented sentence. Hence Incorrect.
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QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's [#permalink]

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GMATNinja I have 1 doubt in this question. Three things are suggesting something about a person's something, then how can we use a singular "suggests"; shouldn't "suggests" be replaced with "suggest" in all the options?

In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's blending of solar imagery, Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting her range and depth of influences, not the least of which is her African heritage.

"social imagery", "thought and figures" and "images" should be parallel

(A) the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting -the usage of "suggesting" makes this sentence a fragment.
(B) borrowing images from ancient classicism, suggests -"borrowing" is not parallel
(C) she borrowed images from ancient classicism, which suggests -"she" makes the structure unparallel
(D) images borrowed from ancient classicism suggests -Correct maintains parallelism.
(E) images that she borrowed from ancient classicism, suggesting -the usage of "suggesting" makes this sentence a fragment.
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QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2017, 02:02
hi, can someone please explain why we have 'figures , and the images she borrowed...' in the original sentence
how is it different in meaning from a sentence that says 'figures and the images she borrowed..'

it would really help if someone could answer this one.
I am not sure i have come across , and so easily in newspapers etc. Maybe I have not been reading carefully enough, Hence I am not aware of this essential rule.
can some one be kind enough to throw some light on this. :roll: :-D

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QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's [#permalink]

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gmatexam439 wrote:
GMATNinja I have 1 doubt in this question. Three things are suggesting something about a person's something, then how can we use a singular "suggests"; shouldn't "suggests" be replaced with "suggest" in all the options?

In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's blending of solar imagery, Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting her range and depth of influences, not the least of which is her African heritage.

"social imagery", "thought and figures" and "images" should be parallel

(A) the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting -the usage of "suggesting" makes this sentence a fragment.
(B) borrowing images from ancient classicism, suggests -"borrowing" is not parallel
(C) she borrowed images from ancient classicism, which suggests -"she" makes the structure unparallel
(D) images borrowed from ancient classicism suggests -Correct maintains parallelism.
(E) images that she borrowed from ancient classicism, suggesting -the usage of "suggesting" makes this sentence a fragment.



Hello gmatexam439,

I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)

Let's take a look at the structure of correct sentence:

In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's blending of

    solar imagery,
    Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and
    images borrowed from ancient classicism


suggests
her range and depth of influences, not the least of which is her African heritage.


Please note that the subject of the sentence is singular noun blending and hence takes singular verb suggests. The said imagery, the figures, and the images do not act as the subject.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's [#permalink]

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doeadoer wrote:
hi, can someone please explain why we have 'figures , and the images she borrowed...' in the original sentence
how is it different in meaning from a sentence that says 'figures and the images she borrowed..'

it would really help if someone could answer this one.
I am not sure i have come across , and so easily in newspapers etc. Maybe I have not been reading carefully enough, Hence I am not aware of this essential rule.
can some one be kind enough to throw some light on this. :roll: :-D




Hello doeadoer,

I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)


Take a look at my post just above this one to see the structure of the sentence.

Per the sentence, three elements make the parallel list:
    i. solar imagery,
    ii. Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and
    iii. the images she borrowed from ancient classicism



Whenever a parallel list consists of more than two elements, the connector joining all the parallel elements in the list is preceded by a comma. Hence, we see the usage of comma + and in this sentence.

In fact, this is a very common usage across GMAT SC parallelism questions. You can review any SC problem on parallelism containing more than two parallel elements in a list. They all have a comma preceding the connector.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2017, 07:39
In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's blending of solar imagery, Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting her range and depth of influences, not the least of which is her African heritage.

the structure of sentences says Phyllis Wheatley's blending of solar imagery, Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and the images : list of three nouns things : imagery ,thought and figure, and images . so the the subject blending must have a verb

(A) the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting
(B) borrowing images from ancient classicism, suggests : it must be a noun as things in the list are noun
(C) she borrowed images from ancient classicism, which suggests: no verb
(D) images borrowed from ancient classicism suggests correct
(E) images that she borrowed from ancient classicism, suggesting
no verb

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Re: QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2017, 08:47
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egmat wrote:
gmatexam439 wrote:
GMATNinja I have 1 doubt in this question. Three things are suggesting something about a person's something, then how can we use a singular "suggests"; shouldn't "suggests" be replaced with "suggest" in all the options?

In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's blending of solar imagery, Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting her range and depth of influences, not the least of which is her African heritage.

"social imagery", "thought and figures" and "images" should be parallel

(A) the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting -the usage of "suggesting" makes this sentence a fragment.
(B) borrowing images from ancient classicism, suggests -"borrowing" is not parallel
(C) she borrowed images from ancient classicism, which suggests -"she" makes the structure unparallel
(D) images borrowed from ancient classicism suggests -Correct maintains parallelism.
(E) images that she borrowed from ancient classicism, suggesting -the usage of "suggesting" makes this sentence a fragment.



Hello gmatexam439,

I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)

Let's take a look at the structure of correct sentence:

In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's blending of

    solar imagery,
    Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and
    images borrowed from ancient classicism


suggests
her range and depth of influences, not the least of which is her African heritage.


Please note that the subject of the sentence is singular noun blending and hence takes singular verb suggests. The said imagery, the figures, and the images do not act as the subject.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha


Hello Shraddha,

Thanks for the quick reply. That did definitely help me.

Until now I was interpreting the sentence in a wrong way. Though I got the answer, I am more comfortable with the sentence now than was before.

Regards
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Re: QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2017, 13:17
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egmat wrote:
doeadoer wrote:
hi, can someone please explain why we have 'figures , and the images she borrowed...' in the original sentence
how is it different in meaning from a sentence that says 'figures and the images she borrowed..'

it would really help if someone could answer this one.
I am not sure i have come across , and so easily in newspapers etc. Maybe I have not been reading carefully enough, Hence I am not aware of this essential rule.
can some one be kind enough to throw some light on this. :roll: :-D




Hello doeadoer,

I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)


Take a look at my post just above this one to see the structure of the sentence.

Per the sentence, three elements make the parallel list:
    i. solar imagery,
    ii. Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and
    iii. the images she borrowed from ancient classicism



Whenever a parallel list consists of more than two elements, the connector joining all the parallel elements in the list is preceded by a comma. Hence, we see the usage of comma + and in this sentence.

In fact, this is a very common usage across GMAT SC parallelism questions. You can review any SC problem on parallelism containing more than two parallel elements in a list. They all have a comma preceding the connector.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha

Woops. I missed out on that one.
Thanks for helping out.

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Re: QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2017, 03:03
In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's blending of solar imagery, Judeo-Christian thought and figures, and the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting her range and depth of influences, not the least of which is her African heritage.

(A) the images she borrowed from ancient classicism suggesting
(B) borrowing images from ancient classicism, suggests
(C) she borrowed images from ancient classicism, which suggests
(D) images borrowed from ancient classicism suggests {borrowed from.... - modifying images}
(E) images that she borrowed from ancient classicism, suggesting



D
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Re: QOTD: In her later poems, Phyllis Wheatley's   [#permalink] 25 Nov 2017, 03:03
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