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QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea

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QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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Verbal Question of The Day: Day 167: Sentence Correction


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Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels.

(A) comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that

(B) comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they

(C) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and

(D) come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that

(E) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they


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Re: QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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[quote="souvik101990"]

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 167: Sentence Correction


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Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels.

(A) comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that

(B) comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they

(C) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and

(D) come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that

(E) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they


ANSWER OPTION D


OPTION A-Subject Verb Agreement Problem----(BEnefits-come) is right and not benefits-comes, which is wrong.
OPTION B-Subject Verb Agreement Problem----(BEnefits-come) is right and not benefits-comes, which is wrong.
OPTION C-Sub-Verb agreement rectified. Parallelism issue-compounds also found and inhibit not matching.
OPTION D-Sub-Verb agreement rectified.PArallelism issue solved-compounds that are also found and compounds that inhibit.(Relative pronoun used correctly )
OPTION E-They is referring to whom???not clear

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Re: QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2017, 05:03
First eliminate between come and comes so that leaves us with choices C,D,E
Then the pronouns they and that look ambiguous so that leaves with choice C

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Re: QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2017, 05:26
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 167: Sentence Correction


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Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels.

(A) comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that

(B) comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they

(C) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and

(D) come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that

(E) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they


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I think the answer is D because you are looking for the sentence that has the correct parallelism and verb tense. I focused first on the verb tense and eliminated A & B because the subject of the sentence is the health benefits so come needs to be plural, not singular. The use of they in E is ambiguous as it could refer to the health benefits or the antioxidants so eliminate E and C is incorrect because of the placement of and in the sentence.

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QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 167: Sentence Correction


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Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels.

(A) comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that

(B) comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they

(C) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and

(D) come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that

(E) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they


Every question of the day will be followed by an expert reply by GMATNinja in 12-15 hours. Stay tuned! Post your answers and explanations to earn kudos.


Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels.

(A) comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that - SV Error
(B) comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they - SV Error
(C) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and - Meaning Error, benifits can not be subject for inhibit
(D) come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that - Correct choice
(E) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they - Use of pronoun they is incorrect

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Re: QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2017, 09:22
+1 for D, parallelism issue resolved

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QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2017, 10:00
Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels.

(A) comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that
Subject verb error. health benefits are plural so plural verb is required.

(B) comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they
Same as A.

(C) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and
and is linking two verbs here, however the only verb here is come for which the subject is health benefits. it does not make sense to say health benefits inhibit the formation.

(D) come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that
Clear parallelism. two clauses ( that are also found and that inhibit ) are linked via and. Compound here is noun and that is modifying compounds.

(E) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they
They is ambiguous. It is not clear whether they is referring to benefits or to compounds.

Answer: D
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Re: QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2017, 11:29
I'm just repeating what all the other user have already posted but the main issues are:
First, "comes" vs "come" -- the first is singular and the second is plural. As we are referencing "Most of the...", it should be plural. A & B are out
Second, of the remaining 3 answers we can focus on Parallelism. C & E violates parallelism rules, thus leaving us with D.

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QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2017, 14:22
Kchaudhary wrote:
Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels.

(A) comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that - SV Error
(B) comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they - SV Error
(C) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and - Meaning Error, benifits can not be subject for inhibit
(D) come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that - Correct choice
(E) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they - Use of pronoun they is incorrect





Hello Kchaudhary,


I must say you have nailed this question in the head. Perfect analysis. You have eliminated Choice C on the meaning basis and not on the parallelism issues.


This is the point worth noticing. Choice C and Choice E do present grammatical parallelism. But the list that these answer choices present is not at all logical, and hence, these choices are incorrect.


It just does not make any sense to say that most of the health benefits of tea inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels. The antioxidants found in tea do so.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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New post 30 Nov 2017, 00:14
Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels. {SANAM} pronoun -> here =>plural

(A) comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that SV agreement

(B) comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they SV agreement

(C) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and inhibit { inhibit is not in option but It's not parallel to also found

(D) come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that

(E) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they => antioxidants / health benefits of tea ??
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Re: QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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New post 03 Dec 2017, 23:15
So we just filmed a live YouTube webinar on the joys of commas, dashes, colons, and semicolons, and this was one of the questions that we... um, could have covered, but decided not to, because an hour whips by quickly, and we had some better examples. But this particular question has a nice, distracting dash, and much of the webinar emphasized the idea that you don't want to get distracted unnecessarily by punctuation on the GMAT.

And the dash isn't terribly interesting here, anyway. The phrase after the dash is a modifier that tells us more about "antioxidants" -- specifically, everything after the dash is a noun ("compounds") with some modifiers attached to it, and the resulting noun phrase just modifies the noun "antioxidants." It's just that some of the versions of the noun phrase make more sense than others.

And I know that I'm a little bit late to the party (the end of pregnancy is awesome!), but hopefully this will still be useful for a few people!

Quote:
(A) comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that

The most obvious issue here is the subject-verb agreement: the subject "most of the health benefits" is plural, so "comes" is wrong.

The noun phrase after the dash also has a funny flaw. What the heck is the "that" doing there? It seems to modify "vitamin C" only, and that doesn't make any sense: it's the compounds "that inhibit the formation of plaque", not just the vitamin C.

Either way, (A) is gone.

Quote:
(B) comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they

Subject-verb agreement is incorrect again, and that's enough reason to get rid of (B).

Plus, there's really no good reason to end the underlined portion by starting a brand-new clause after the "and." The stuff after the dash is all there as a modifier for "antioxidants", and it's awfully weird to suddenly stick a clause at the end of it. We're much better off if the rest of the sentence just continues to modify "compounds", which is a modifier for "antioxidants."

And even if you don't believe a word I said in that last paragraph, the subject-verb thing is a pretty big deal, so we can ditch (B).

Let's line (C) and (D) up next to each other to make it easier to see which one is better:
Quote:
(C) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and
(D) come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that

OK, so the subject-verb agreement is fixed here, so the only thing we need to think about is the modifier that comes after the dash. In (D), we have some nice parallelism: "compounds that are found in beta carotene... and that inhibit the formation of plaque..." Cool, "compounds" is just modified a couple of times.

But in (C), the end of the sentence is structured in a way that makes it seem like "inhibit" and "found" are verbs: "compounds also found in beta carotene... and inhibit the formation of plaque..." That's not cool: we can use the noun phrase beginning with "compounds" as a modifier for the noun "antioxidants" (which is what happens in D), but we can't stick a whole clause in there after the dash as a modifier for "antioxidants" (which is the story in C).

So (C) is out, and we can keep (D).

Quote:
(E) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they

(E) has exactly the same issue as the last part of (B): there's really no good reason to end the underlined portion by starting a brand-new clause after the "and." The stuff after the dash is all there as a modifier for "antioxidants", and it's awfully weird to suddenly stick a clause at the end of it. We're much better off if the rest of the sentence just continues to modify "compounds", which is a modifier for "antioxidants."

(And yes, I cut and pasted some of the text in (B). My wife is in the early bits of labor, so I'm striving for efficiency between contractions. They aren't dramatic yet. TMI? OK, cool. I'll stop now.)

So (D) is the best we can do.
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Re: QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2017, 01:30
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 167: Sentence Correction


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Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels.

(A) comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that

(B) comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they

(C) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and

(D) come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that

(E) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they


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look at choice e.
first , we need to realize grammatical role of each choice. this phrase refers to which phrase in the sentence. "they" in choice e refers grammatically to "most of benifits", making an illogic sense.
e is gone

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Re: QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2017, 03:28
GMATNinja wrote:
So we just filmed a live YouTube webinar on the joys of commas, dashes, colons, and semicolons, and this was one of the questions that we... um, could have covered, but decided not to, because an hour whips by quickly, and we had some better examples. But this particular question has a nice, distracting dash, and much of the webinar emphasized the idea that you don't want to get distracted unnecessarily by punctuation on the GMAT.

And the dash isn't terribly interesting here, anyway. The phrase after the dash is a modifier that tells us more about "antioxidants" -- specifically, everything after the dash is a noun ("compounds") with some modifiers attached to it, and the resulting noun phrase just modifies the noun "antioxidants." It's just that some of the versions of the noun phrase make more sense than others.

And I know that I'm a little bit late to the party (the end of pregnancy is awesome!), but hopefully this will still be useful for a few people!

Quote:
(A) comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that

The most obvious issue here is the subject-verb agreement: the subject "most of the health benefits" is plural, so "comes" is wrong.

The noun phrase after the dash also has a funny flaw. What the heck is the "that" doing there? It seems to modify "vitamin C" only, and that doesn't make any sense: it's the compounds "that inhibit the formation of plaque", not just the vitamin C.

Either way, (A) is gone.

Quote:
(B) comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they

Subject-verb agreement is incorrect again, and that's enough reason to get rid of (B).

Plus, there's really no good reason to end the underlined portion by starting a brand-new clause after the "and." The stuff after the dash is all there as a modifier for "antioxidants", and it's awfully weird to suddenly stick a clause at the end of it. We're much better off if the rest of the sentence just continues to modify "compounds", which is a modifier for "antioxidants."

And even if you don't believe a word I said in that last paragraph, the subject-verb thing is a pretty big deal, so we can ditch (B).

Let's line (C) and (D) up next to each other to make it easier to see which one is better:
Quote:
(C) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and
(D) come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that

OK, so the subject-verb agreement is fixed here, so the only thing we need to think about is the modifier that comes after the dash. In (D), we have some nice parallelism: "compounds that are found in beta carotene... and that inhibit the formation of plaque..." Cool, "compounds" is just modified a couple of times.

But in (C), the end of the sentence is structured in a way that makes it seem like "inhibit" and "found" are verbs: "compounds also found in beta carotene... and inhibit the formation of plaque..." That's not cool: we can use the noun phrase beginning with "compounds" as a modifier for the noun "antioxidants" (which is what happens in D), but we can't stick a whole clause in there after the dash as a modifier for "antioxidants" (which is the story in C).

So (C) is out, and we can keep (D).

Quote:
(E) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they

(E) has exactly the same issue as the last part of (B): there's really no good reason to end the underlined portion by starting a brand-new clause after the "and." The stuff after the dash is all there as a modifier for "antioxidants", and it's awfully weird to suddenly stick a clause at the end of it. We're much better off if the rest of the sentence just continues to modify "compounds", which is a modifier for "antioxidants."

(And yes, I cut and pasted some of the text in (B). My wife is in the early bits of labor, so I'm striving for efficiency between contractions. They aren't dramatic yet. TMI? OK, cool. I'll stop now.)

So (D) is the best we can do.



Hi GMATNinja.

I am big fan of your explanations.

Could you please help me understand if inhibit is referring to benefits in option C and that would be the correct way to eliminate this answer choice.

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Re: QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2017, 03:57
alokgupta1009 wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
So we just filmed a live YouTube webinar on the joys of commas, dashes, colons, and semicolons, and this was one of the questions that we... um, could have covered, but decided not to, because an hour whips by quickly, and we had some better examples. But this particular question has a nice, distracting dash, and much of the webinar emphasized the idea that you don't want to get distracted unnecessarily by punctuation on the GMAT.

And the dash isn't terribly interesting here, anyway. The phrase after the dash is a modifier that tells us more about "antioxidants" -- specifically, everything after the dash is a noun ("compounds") with some modifiers attached to it, and the resulting noun phrase just modifies the noun "antioxidants." It's just that some of the versions of the noun phrase make more sense than others.

And I know that I'm a little bit late to the party (the end of pregnancy is awesome!), but hopefully this will still be useful for a few people!

Quote:
(A) comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that

The most obvious issue here is the subject-verb agreement: the subject "most of the health benefits" is plural, so "comes" is wrong.

The noun phrase after the dash also has a funny flaw. What the heck is the "that" doing there? It seems to modify "vitamin C" only, and that doesn't make any sense: it's the compounds "that inhibit the formation of plaque", not just the vitamin C.

Either way, (A) is gone.

Quote:
(B) comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they

Subject-verb agreement is incorrect again, and that's enough reason to get rid of (B).

Plus, there's really no good reason to end the underlined portion by starting a brand-new clause after the "and." The stuff after the dash is all there as a modifier for "antioxidants", and it's awfully weird to suddenly stick a clause at the end of it. We're much better off if the rest of the sentence just continues to modify "compounds", which is a modifier for "antioxidants."

And even if you don't believe a word I said in that last paragraph, the subject-verb thing is a pretty big deal, so we can ditch (B).

Let's line (C) and (D) up next to each other to make it easier to see which one is better:
Quote:
(C) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and
(D) come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that

OK, so the subject-verb agreement is fixed here, so the only thing we need to think about is the modifier that comes after the dash. In (D), we have some nice parallelism: "compounds that are found in beta carotene... and that inhibit the formation of plaque..." Cool, "compounds" is just modified a couple of times.

But in (C), the end of the sentence is structured in a way that makes it seem like "inhibit" and "found" are verbs: "compounds also found in beta carotene... and inhibit the formation of plaque..." That's not cool: we can use the noun phrase beginning with "compounds" as a modifier for the noun "antioxidants" (which is what happens in D), but we can't stick a whole clause in there after the dash as a modifier for "antioxidants" (which is the story in C).

So (C) is out, and we can keep (D).

Quote:
(E) come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they

(E) has exactly the same issue as the last part of (B): there's really no good reason to end the underlined portion by starting a brand-new clause after the "and." The stuff after the dash is all there as a modifier for "antioxidants", and it's awfully weird to suddenly stick a clause at the end of it. We're much better off if the rest of the sentence just continues to modify "compounds", which is a modifier for "antioxidants."

(And yes, I cut and pasted some of the text in (B). My wife is in the early bits of labor, so I'm striving for efficiency between contractions. They aren't dramatic yet. TMI? OK, cool. I'll stop now.)

So (D) is the best we can do.



Hi GMATNinja.

I am big fan of your explanations.

Could you please help me understand if inhibit is referring to benefits in option C and that would be the correct way to eliminate this answer choice.


Hi yes inhibit refers to benefits. if you check inhibit is followed by a parallelism marker "and". Since inhibit is a verb it must have another verb parallel to it. In the sentence only verb other than inhibit is come for which subject is benefits. Therefore, IMO your thinking is correct.

I hope it helps.

PS - I am no expert.

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Regards
SandySilva


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Re: QOTD: Most of the purported health benefits of tea   [#permalink] 07 Dec 2017, 03:57
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