Last visit was: 13 Jul 2024, 22:43 It is currently 13 Jul 2024, 22:43
Close
GMAT Club Daily Prep
Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History
Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.
Close
Request Expert Reply
Confirm Cancel
SORT BY:
Date
Tags:
Poor Quality,       
Show Tags
Hide Tags
User avatar
Retired Moderator
Joined: 20 Dec 2010
Posts: 1108
Own Kudos [?]: 4751 [110]
Given Kudos: 376
Send PM
Most Helpful Reply
Math Expert
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 94341
Own Kudos [?]: 640563 [25]
Given Kudos: 85005
Send PM
Math Expert
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 94341
Own Kudos [?]: 640563 [12]
Given Kudos: 85005
Send PM
General Discussion
User avatar
Retired Moderator
Joined: 20 Dec 2010
Posts: 1108
Own Kudos [?]: 4751 [0]
Given Kudos: 376
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
Bunuel wrote:
fluke wrote:
For what range of values of 'x' will the inequality 15x - (2/x) > 1?

Not a good question.


It's not a good question because it is not formed correctly or because it is subpar or both?

What if the question read, "Which of the following represents the complete range of x over which 15x - (2/x) > 1"?
Then; D would be the only choice, right?

More important question is:
How x<-1/3, -1/3<x<0, 0<x<2/5 and x>2/5; get reduced to -1/3<x<0, x>2/5.

Is there any comprehensive material available for these types of inequalities and ranges apart from the shortcut method suggested by gurpreetsingh?
User avatar
Manager
Manager
Joined: 08 Nov 2010
Posts: 202
Own Kudos [?]: 502 [0]
Given Kudos: 161
 Q50  V41
GPA: 3.9
WE 1: Business Development
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
can someone plz explain me how u go from
15x^2-x-2
into
(3x+1)(5x-2)

can u show me how u do it fast?

thanks.
Math Expert
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 94341
Own Kudos [?]: 640563 [8]
Given Kudos: 85005
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
5
Kudos
3
Bookmarks
Expert Reply
144144 wrote:
can someone plz explain me how u go from
15x^2-x-2
into
(3x+1)(5x-2)

can u show me how u do it fast?

thanks.


Factoring Quadratics: https://www.purplemath.com/modules/factquad.htm

Solving Quadratic Equations: https://www.purplemath.com/modules/solvquad.htm

Good links with several different approaches.

Hope it helps.
Tutor
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 15108
Own Kudos [?]: 66609 [1]
Given Kudos: 436
Location: Pune, India
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
1
Kudos
Expert Reply
144144 wrote:
can someone plz explain me how u go from
15x^2-x-2
into
(3x+1)(5x-2)

can u show me how u do it fast?

thanks.


You factorize by splitting the middle term.
Check out a discussion on this concept:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/hard-factoring-question-109006.html#p870223
User avatar
Manager
Manager
Joined: 04 Apr 2010
Posts: 91
Own Kudos [?]: 635 [0]
Given Kudos: 31
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
Why this way doesn't work?
When X is +ve
15 x^2 - 2 > x OR 15x^2-x-2 >0
OR (5x-2) (3x+1) >0 ==> x>2/5, x>-1/3 ====> X>2/5
When X is -ve (everything stays same only inequality sign changes)
(5x-2) (3x+1) <0 ==> x<2/5, x<-1/3 ====> X< - 1/3
So E.
Math Expert
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 94341
Own Kudos [?]: 640563 [7]
Given Kudos: 85005
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
4
Kudos
3
Bookmarks
Expert Reply
bhandariavi wrote:
Why this way doesn't work?
When X is +ve
15 x^2 - 2 > x OR 15x^2-x-2 >0
OR (5x-2) (3x+1) >0 ==> x>2/5, x>-1/3 ====> X>2/5
When X is -ve (everything stays same only inequality sign changes)
(5x-2) (3x+1) <0 ==> x<2/5, x<-1/3 ====> X< - 1/3
So E.


The red parts are not correct/

\(x>0\) --> \((3x+1)(5x-2)>0\) --> roots are -1/3 and 2/5 --> ">" sign indicates that the solution lies to the left of a smaller root and to the right of the larger root: \(x<-\frac{1}{3}\) and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\) --> since we consider \(x>0\) range then the solution for this range is: \(x>\frac{2}{5}\);

\(x<0\) --> \((3x+1)(5x-2)>0\) --> the same roots: -1/3 and 2/5 --> "<" sign indicates that the solution lies between the roots: \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<\frac{2}{5}\) --> since we consider \(x<0\) range then the solution for this range is: \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\).

Thus \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) holds true for \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\) and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\).

See my 1st and 2nd posts for alternate approach and the links there for theory on this kind of questions.

Hope it helps.
User avatar
Manager
Manager
Joined: 27 Feb 2012
Posts: 91
Own Kudos [?]: 29 [1]
Given Kudos: 42
Concentration: General Management, Nonprofit
GMAT 1: 700 Q47 V39
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
1
Kudos
Bunuel wrote:
\(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) ---> \(\frac{15x^2-x-2}{x}>0\)


I've been looking at this for 20 minutes, but if someone could explain this particular step a little more thoroughly I would appreciate it. I get the rest of the problem. I'm not understanding why there is an x in the denominator. :(
avatar
Intern
Intern
Joined: 03 Feb 2012
Posts: 6
Own Kudos [?]: 4 [2]
Given Kudos: 2
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
2
Kudos
ohsballer wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
\(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) ---> \(\frac{15x^2-x-2}{x}>0\)


I've been looking at this for 20 minutes, but if someone could explain this particular step a little more thoroughly I would appreciate it. I get the rest of the problem. I'm not understanding why there is an x in the denominator. :(


Basically he moved the 1 over to the LHS, then used x as the common denominator for the LHS
User avatar
Intern
Intern
Joined: 07 Jul 2012
Posts: 10
Own Kudos [?]: 1 [0]
Given Kudos: 1
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
Bunuel wrote:
fluke wrote:
For what range of values of 'x' will the inequality 15x - (2/x) > 1?

A. x > 0.4
B. x < 1/3
C. -1/3 < x < 0.4, x > 15/2
D. -1/3 < x < 0, x > 2/5
E. x < -1/3 and x > 2/5


\(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) ---> \(\frac{15x^2-x-2}{x}>0\) --> \(\frac{(3x+1)(5x-2)}{x}>0\) -->3 expressions change their signs at: -1/3, 0, 2/5, so 4 ranges: \(x<-\frac{1}{3}\), \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), \(0<x<\frac{2}{5}\) and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\) --> in rightmost range expression is positive: so -+-+ --> \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\).

Now, two options offer the ranges for which given inequality holds true: A (offers the part of the range, but for x>0.4=2/5 given inequality holds true) and D (covers all possible values of x for which the inequality holds true). So if the question asks to solve \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) for the true ranges then the answer is D but if the question asks for which of the following ranges inequality \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) holds true than the answer could be D as well as A.

P.S. You can eliminate options B an C right away as they include zero and in our expression x is in denominator thus it can not be zero.

Check for more about the approach used here: everything-is-less-than-zero-108884.html?hilit=extreme#p868863, here: inequalities-trick-91482.html and here: xy-plane-71492.html?hilit=solving%20quadratic#p841486

Not a good question.


Could anyone please explain why 0 is a root? I thought that if 0 was in the denominator then the result would be undefined?
Tutor
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 15108
Own Kudos [?]: 66609 [1]
Given Kudos: 436
Location: Pune, India
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
1
Kudos
Expert Reply
arnivorous wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
fluke wrote:
For what range of values of 'x' will the inequality 15x - (2/x) > 1?

A. x > 0.4
B. x < 1/3
C. -1/3 < x < 0.4, x > 15/2
D. -1/3 < x < 0, x > 2/5
E. x < -1/3 and x > 2/5


\(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) ---> \(\frac{15x^2-x-2}{x}>0\) --> \(\frac{(3x+1)(5x-2)}{x}>0\) -->3 expressions change their signs at: -1/3, 0, 2/5, so 4 ranges: \(x<-\frac{1}{3}\), \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), \(0<x<\frac{2}{5}\) and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\) --> in rightmost range expression is positive: so -+-+ --> \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\).

Now, two options offer the ranges for which given inequality holds true: A (offers the part of the range, but for x>0.4=2/5 given inequality holds true) and D (covers all possible values of x for which the inequality holds true). So if the question asks to solve \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) for the true ranges then the answer is D but if the question asks for which of the following ranges inequality \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) holds true than the answer could be D as well as A.

P.S. You can eliminate options B an C right away as they include zero and in our expression x is in denominator thus it can not be zero.

Check for more about the approach used here: everything-is-less-than-zero-108884.html?hilit=extreme#p868863, here: inequalities-trick-91482.html and here: xy-plane-71492.html?hilit=solving%20quadratic#p841486

Not a good question.


Could anyone please explain why 0 is a root? I thought that if 0 was in the denominator then the result would be undefined?


As shown by Bunuel, the range for which the inequality works is -1/3 < x < 0 and x > 2/5. Notice that x cannot be 0 here.

0 is not a root here. Note that the term 'root' is generally used for equations (the value which when substituted for the unknown satisfies the equation). When working with inequalities, you deal with the range of values that work.

The inequality is undefined at 0 but it changes sign around it. So you include it while working on finding the ranges where the expression is positive/negative. To understand how and why you do this, check out the inequalities trick link given by Bunuel above or my post: https://www.gmatclub.com/forum/veritas-prep-resource-links-no-longer-available-399979.html#/2012/06 ... e-factors/
User avatar
Manager
Manager
Joined: 16 Feb 2012
Posts: 126
Own Kudos [?]: 2113 [0]
Given Kudos: 121
Concentration: Finance, Economics
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
Bunuel wrote:
fluke wrote:
For what range of values of 'x' will the inequality 15x - (2/x) > 1?

A. x > 0.4
B. x < 1/3
C. -1/3 < x < 0.4, x > 15/2
D. -1/3 < x < 0, x > 2/5
E. x < -1/3 and x > 2/5


\(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) ---> \(\frac{15x^2-x-2}{x}>0\) --> \(\frac{(3x+1)(5x-2)}{x}>0\) -->3 expressions change their signs at: -1/3, 0, 2/5, so 4 ranges: \(x<-\frac{1}{3}\), \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), \(0<x<\frac{2}{5}\) and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\) --> in rightmost range expression is positive: so -+-+ --> \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\).

Now, two options offer the ranges for which given inequality holds true: A (offers the part of the range, but for x>0.4=2/5 given inequality holds true) and D (covers all possible values of x for which the inequality holds true). So if the question asks to solve \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) for the true ranges then the answer is D but if the question asks for which of the following ranges inequality \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) holds true than the answer could be D as well as A.

P.S. You can eliminate options B an C right away as they include zero and in our expression x is in denominator thus it can not be zero.

Check for more about the approach used here: everything-is-less-than-zero-108884.html?hilit=extreme#p868863, here: inequalities-trick-91482.html and here: xy-plane-71492.html?hilit=solving%20quadratic#p841486

Not a good question.



If someone could explain why we cannot multiply the whole equation with x? 15x - (2/x) > 1 when multiplied with x we get 15x^2 - x - 2 > 0
I see that is is wrong, but don't understand why... Why is x in the denominator important?
Math Expert
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 94341
Own Kudos [?]: 640563 [9]
Given Kudos: 85005
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
5
Kudos
4
Bookmarks
Expert Reply
Stiv wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
fluke wrote:
For what range of values of 'x' will the inequality 15x - (2/x) > 1?

A. x > 0.4
B. x < 1/3
C. -1/3 < x < 0.4, x > 15/2
D. -1/3 < x < 0, x > 2/5
E. x < -1/3 and x > 2/5


\(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) ---> \(\frac{15x^2-x-2}{x}>0\) --> \(\frac{(3x+1)(5x-2)}{x}>0\) -->3 expressions change their signs at: -1/3, 0, 2/5, so 4 ranges: \(x<-\frac{1}{3}\), \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), \(0<x<\frac{2}{5}\) and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\) --> in rightmost range expression is positive: so -+-+ --> \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\).

Now, two options offer the ranges for which given inequality holds true: A (offers the part of the range, but for x>0.4=2/5 given inequality holds true) and D (covers all possible values of x for which the inequality holds true). So if the question asks to solve \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) for the true ranges then the answer is D but if the question asks for which of the following ranges inequality \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) holds true than the answer could be D as well as A.

P.S. You can eliminate options B an C right away as they include zero and in our expression x is in denominator thus it can not be zero.

Check for more about the approach used here: everything-is-less-than-zero-108884.html?hilit=extreme#p868863, here: inequalities-trick-91482.html and here: xy-plane-71492.html?hilit=solving%20quadratic#p841486

Not a good question.



If someone could explain why we cannot multiply the whole equation with x? 15x - (2/x) > 1 when multiplied with x we get 15x^2 - x - 2 > 0
I see that is is wrong, but don't understand why... Why is x in the denominator important?


Never multiply (or reduce) an inequality by variable (or by an expression with variable) if you don't know its sign.

So you cannot multiply both parts of inequality 15x - (2/x) > 1 by x as you don't know the sign of this unknown: if x>0 you should write 15x^2 - x - 2 > 0 BUT if x<0 you should write 15x^2 - x - 2 < 0 (flip the sign).

Hope it helps.
Verbal Forum Moderator
Joined: 10 Oct 2012
Posts: 485
Own Kudos [?]: 3134 [2]
Given Kudos: 141
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
1
Kudos
1
Bookmarks
Stiv wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
fluke wrote:
For what range of values of 'x' will the inequality 15x - (2/x) > 1?

A. x > 0.4
B. x < 1/3
C. -1/3 < x < 0.4, x > 15/2
D. -1/3 < x < 0, x > 2/5
E. x < -1/3 and x > 2/5


\(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) ---> \(\frac{15x^2-x-2}{x}>0\) --> \(\frac{(3x+1)(5x-2)}{x}>0\) -->3 expressions change their signs at: -1/3, 0, 2/5, so 4 ranges: \(x<-\frac{1}{3}\), \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), \(0<x<\frac{2}{5}\) and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\) --> in rightmost range expression is positive: so -+-+ --> \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\).

Now, two options offer the ranges for which given inequality holds true: A (offers the part of the range, but for x>0.4=2/5 given inequality holds true) and D (covers all possible values of x for which the inequality holds true). So if the question asks to solve \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) for the true ranges then the answer is D but if the question asks for which of the following ranges inequality \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) holds true than the answer could be D as well as A.

P.S. You can eliminate options B an C right away as they include zero and in our expression x is in denominator thus it can not be zero.

Check for more about the approach used here: everything-is-less-than-zero-108884.html?hilit=extreme#p868863, here: inequalities-trick-91482.html and here: xy-plane-71492.html?hilit=solving%20quadratic#p841486

Not a good question.



If someone could explain why we cannot multiply the whole equation with x? 15x - (2/x) > 1 when multiplied with x we get 15x^2 - x - 2 > 0
I see that is is wrong, but don't understand why... Why is x in the denominator important?


You can not multiply by x because you don't know about the sign of x. Take this example,

x+\(\frac{1}{x}\)>-2. If we multiply across by x, we get x^2+1>-2x or --> (x+1)^2>0. As the square of any real number is always positive, thus the solution of the given inequality : for all real values of x. But, we can see that for x=-5, the inequality doesn't hold good. So where is the mistake? It is in the fact that we multiplied it by x, without knowing the sign of x. Instead , if we multiply by x^2 throughout, we get x^3+x>-2x^2 --> or x(x^2+2x+1)>0 --> x(x+1)^2>0.Thus, as (x+1)^2 is always positive, this boils down to x>0. Thus the ACTUAL solution of the given inequality is : for any value of x>0.
So, basically, even if you WANT to multiply, do it by multiplying by x^2, or x^4. Basically, any power that makes the factor that you are multiplying across positive.
User avatar
Intern
Intern
Joined: 04 Nov 2012
Status:Tougher times ...
Posts: 32
Own Kudos [?]: 163 [1]
Given Kudos: 44
Location: India
GMAT 1: 480 Q32 V25
WE:General Management (Manufacturing)
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
Bunuel wrote:
fluke wrote:
For what range of values of 'x' will the inequality 15x - (2/x) > 1?

A. x > 0.4
B. x < 1/3
C. -1/3 < x < 0.4, x > 15/2
D. -1/3 < x < 0, x > 2/5
E. x < -1/3 and x > 2/5


\(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) ---> \(\frac{15x^2-x-2}{x}>0\) --> \(\frac{(3x+1)(5x-2)}{x}>0\) -->3 expressions change their signs at: -1/3, 0, 2/5, so 4 ranges: \(x<-\frac{1}{3}\), \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), \(0<x<\frac{2}{5}\) and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\) --> in rightmost range expression is positive: so -+-+ --> \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\).

Now, two options offer the ranges for which given inequality holds true: A (offers the part of the range, but for x>0.4=2/5 given inequality holds true) and D (covers all possible values of x for which the inequality holds true). So if the question asks to solve \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) for the true ranges then the answer is D but if the question asks for which of the following ranges inequality \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) holds true than the answer could be D as well as A.

P.S. You can eliminate options B an C right away as they include zero and in our expression x is in denominator thus it can not be zero.

Check for more about the approach used here: everything-is-less-than-zero-108884.html?hilit=extreme#p868863, here: inequalities-trick-91482.html and here: xy-plane-71492.html?hilit=solving%20quadratic#p841486

Not a good question.


Hi Banuel,

When i factorsie 15x^2 - X-2 =0 i got only only 2 roots : -1/3 and 2/5. ( I cross multiplied the denominator x so it become "0" on the RHS.)

So i got only 3 intervals. How did you got 3 roots , especially 0 as a root. please provide me the insight and tell me where did i went wrong.

By the way thank you very much for your links to learn inequalities concepts. It's very useful.

Thanks in advance.

Regards
Math Expert
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 94341
Own Kudos [?]: 640563 [0]
Given Kudos: 85005
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
Expert Reply
kabilank87 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
fluke wrote:
For what range of values of 'x' will the inequality 15x - (2/x) > 1?

A. x > 0.4
B. x < 1/3
C. -1/3 < x < 0.4, x > 15/2
D. -1/3 < x < 0, x > 2/5
E. x < -1/3 and x > 2/5


\(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) ---> \(\frac{15x^2-x-2}{x}>0\) --> \(\frac{(3x+1)(5x-2)}{x}>0\) -->3 expressions change their signs at: -1/3, 0, 2/5, so 4 ranges: \(x<-\frac{1}{3}\), \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), \(0<x<\frac{2}{5}\) and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\) --> in rightmost range expression is positive: so -+-+ --> \(-\frac{1}{3}<x<0\), and \(x>\frac{2}{5}\).

Now, two options offer the ranges for which given inequality holds true: A (offers the part of the range, but for x>0.4=2/5 given inequality holds true) and D (covers all possible values of x for which the inequality holds true). So if the question asks to solve \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) for the true ranges then the answer is D but if the question asks for which of the following ranges inequality \(15x-\frac{2}{x}>1\) holds true than the answer could be D as well as A.

P.S. You can eliminate options B an C right away as they include zero and in our expression x is in denominator thus it can not be zero.

Check for more about the approach used here: everything-is-less-than-zero-108884.html?hilit=extreme#p868863, here: inequalities-trick-91482.html and here: xy-plane-71492.html?hilit=solving%20quadratic#p841486

Not a good question.


Hi Banuel,

When i factorsie 15x^2 - X-2 =0 i got only only 2 roots : -1/3 and 2/5. ( I cross multiplied the denominator x so it become "0" on the RHS.)

So i got only 3 intervals. How did you got 3 roots , especially 0 as a root. please provide me the insight and tell me where did i went wrong.

By the way thank you very much for your links to learn inequalities concepts. It's very useful.

Thanks in advance.

Regards


Check here: range-for-variable-x-in-a-given-inequality-109468.html#p1131289 and here: range-for-variable-x-in-a-given-inequality-109468.html#p1208802

Hope it helps.
User avatar
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 13 May 2013
Posts: 311
Own Kudos [?]: 570 [0]
Given Kudos: 134
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
I understand the way to solve this problem, but I'm still not sure as to why d. is correct and not a. Is is because d is a more "complete" range of correct values?

Thanks!
Tutor
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 15108
Own Kudos [?]: 66609 [1]
Given Kudos: 436
Location: Pune, India
Send PM
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
1
Kudos
Expert Reply
WholeLottaLove wrote:
I understand the way to solve this problem, but I'm still not sure as to why d. is correct and not a. Is is because d is a more "complete" range of correct values?

Thanks!



The question asks you for the range of values for which the inequality holds. So basically, you need to give all values of x for which the inequality holds. Since -1/3 < x< 0 is also a part of this solution, (D) includes all value. (A) is only a part of this solution.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: For what range of values of x will the inequality [#permalink]
 1   2   
Moderator:
Math Expert
94341 posts