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Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended

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Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended sales slump in women's apparel, the seven-store retailer said it would start a three-month liquidation sale in all of its stores.


(A) its many problems had been the recent

(B) its many problems has been the recently

(C) its many problems is the recently

(D) their many problems is the recent

(E) their many problems had been the recent


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 242: Sentence Correction


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Spoiler: :: nytimes article
https://www.nytimes.com/1989/06/09/business/cohoes-stores-in-bankruptcy.html

Reporting that one problem had been the recent, extended sales slump in women's apparel, the five-store retailer said it would start a three-month liquidation sale next week in its flagship store in Cohoes, just north of Albany, and in the East Windsor, Conn., branch store. Its three other stores - in Rochester; Cranston, R.I., and Princeton, N.J. - have already closed.

Originally posted by Sameer on 23 May 2003, 01:43.
Last edited by Bunuel on 16 Oct 2018, 20:41, edited 2 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: QOTD: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Mar 2018, 03:33
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This one is an absolute classic. One key to the question is that “the seven-store retailer” is singular, so “its” definitely works better than “they.” Most people catch that part, though.

The more common mistake is with the verb tenses. Hopefully, you immediately notice the verb tense in the phrase “one of its many problems had been the recent... sales slump." "Had been" is past perfect tense, and for that to be acceptable, there has to another past action somewhere in the sentence that occurs AFTER the recent sales slump. The tricky part is noticing that "said" is actually in simple past tense, and that actually makes sense: the recent sales slump had been a problem before the retailer said that it would begin liquidation.

So with that in mind…
Quote:
(A) its many problems had been the recent

This looks pretty good. The pronoun is correct, and the past perfect makes sense, as described above. So let’s keep (A).

Quote:
(B) its many problems has been the recently

Now the verb tense doesn’t work: “has been” (present perfect, if you like jargon) indicates an action that started in the past and continues into the present. So the sequencing doesn’t really make sense in its current form: literally, it’s saying that the retailer said -- in the past – that it would start a liquidation sale (implying that the retailer is closing down), but somehow it reported an ongoing sales slump that continues into the present? Seems odd to me. We’re trying to say that one of the retailer’s many problems included a sales slump, and THEN the retailer announced the liquidation. So the present perfect tense isn’t ideal in (B).

And if you don’t believe that, we also have a problem with the adverb “recently”:
  • ”recent extended sales slump” → Both “recent” and “extended” are adjectives that describe the “sales slump.” And that makes sense: the sales slump is extended (a synonym for “long” in this case), and it also is recent. Fine.
  • ”recently extended sales slump” → Now “recently” is an adverb that modifies “extended.” That warps the meaning: now the sales slump was recently extended, meaning that the sales slump was just – in the last few days or weeks – somehow lengthened. And there’s no reason why we would say that here: the sentence is trying to say that the sales slump itself was recent, not that it was lengthened recently.

So we have a couple of not-terribly-easy reasons to eliminate (B).

Quote:
(C) its many problems is the recently

(C) basically has some of the same problems as (B). For starters, the present tense is definitely wrong here: the retailer – in the past tense – said that it would start a liquidation sale, so it doesn’t make sense to say that one of its many problems is the sales slump. How could the sales slump happen AFTER the announcement to liquidate?

And “recently” is still a problem, too. See the explanation for (B) for more on this issue.

So (C) is out.

Quote:
(D) their many problems is the recent

The present tense still doesn’t make sense – see the explanation for (C) for more on that issue. And “their” is plural, and can’t logically refer to the (singular) “seven-store retailer.”

So we can eliminate (D).

Quote:
(E) their many problems had been the recent

I’m good with the verb tense (see the explanation at the very top of this post for more), but “their” once again can’t refer to the (singular) “seven-store retailer.”

We can eliminate (E), and we’re left with (A).
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2011, 08:33
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Ron Purewal of MGMAT addressed this issue on a different forum! Just for everybody's benefit...this is what he exactly said -

"recent" is an adjective; as such, it modifies a noun.
"recently" is an adverb; as such, it modifies an action, adjective, or other adverb.

the difference here is meaning-based: if the INTENDED MEANING of the sentence is that the noun itself is recent, then you use "recent" to describe that noun.
on the other hand, if the INTENDED MEANING of the sentence is that an action, adjective, or other adverb is recent, then you should use "recently".

examples: (note that "mastering" a sound recording means to improve the quality of the sound after initially recording it)

* recently mastered recordings
--> here, "recently" is an adverb, and so it modifies "mastered".
therefore, this phrase refers to recordings that have been mastered recently -- regardless of the time at which they were originally recorded. so, for instance, if i have a 1947 recording of arturo toscanini's orchestra that was just mastered last year, then that's a recently mastered recording.

* recent mastered recordings
--> here, "recent" is an adjective, and so it modifies "(mastered) recordings".
therefore, this phrase refers to recent recordings that also happen to have been mastered. so, for instance, the aforementioned toscanini recording would *not* be one of these, because it's not a recent recording.
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2004, 00:32
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108. Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended sales slump in women's apparel, the seven-store retailer said it would start a three-month liquidation sale in all of its stores.
(A) its many problems had been the recent This sounds right(B) its many problems has been the recentlythis is wrong because, the exteded sales alump in women's aparralle acts like a noun clause. We cannot modify a noun or a noun clause with an adverb as in this choice. Secondly the choice has been does not sound right to me because there was a sale slump before the problem and therefore, this choice does not properly establish the sequence of events events.C) its many problems is the recently This must be eliminated
(D) their many problems is the recent this must be eliminated
(E) their many problems had been the recent. this must be eliminated
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2010, 13:57
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* Recent is the adjective form; adjective always modify nouns and hence recent modifies extended sale slump (noun form)
* Recently is an adverb form; adverbs modify verbs, adjective or another adverb and hence recently modifies only extended (which is an adjective for sales slump)

Besides that, I think the question is of using "had been" vs "is". With the verb "said" (past tense), "had been" is appropriate since sales slump happened before the retailer said and it happened in the past. So perfect tense is used rather than simple present.

Hope this helps.

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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2012, 23:01
i have a clear understanding why had been tense should be used. But really i dont understand is there any problem why recently(adverb) cant modify the verb extended sales slump? or it can modify????
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2012, 14:12
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skamal7 wrote:
i have a clear understanding why had been tense should be used. But really i dont understand is there any problem why recently(adverb) cant modify the verb extended sales slump? or it can modify????


Hi there,

Let's take an example and explain:

Currently the date is Dec 20.
Picture that there is a discount offer going on in a store for Christmas.
Now this discount offer is extended beyond Dec 25 till 31 Dec.
So this becomes extended discount offer.

Now imagine if similar thing happened during Thanksgiving weekend (Nov 22) as well.
The discount offer was initially supposed to be only for 3 days.
But it was extended for 3 more days.
So that was also an extended discount offer.

So if today is Dec 20, then there is one extended discount offer going on right now through Dec 31. This extended sale is recent
But the one that happened in the end of November is not recent anymore.

Hopefully this helps explain why recent and extended are mutually exclusive. One is not dependent on the other. They are both individual adjectives of sales slump.

However, in choice B, you actually make "recently" modify extended, implying that the sales slump was recently extended.

Hope this helps. :)
Thanks.
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2013, 03:23
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umeshpatil wrote:
Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended sales slump in women's apparel, the seven store retailer said it would start a three-month liquidation sale in all of its stores.

A. its many problems had been the recent
B. its many problems has been the recently
C. its many problems is the recently
D. their many problems is the recent
E. their many problems had been the recent

Can you please explain what is wrong with Options B & C ?
I also want to know how recent extended and recently extended are different?


Hii Umesh.
First understand the meaning of the sentence in question.
Two things are taking place here.
i) The retailer is reporting that he has been facing problems because of the recent extended sales slump.
ii) The retailer said that he would start a three month liquidation sales.
Now, since you to strictly mention the sequence of events, henceforth you have to use had been.
Without this, it would seem that retailer would start a three month liquidation sales and will then report. That will distort the meaning as well as be an illogical choice too.

Now to your second question:
Recent extended sales slump- It implies that among several extended sales slump, you are more concerned with the recent one. Recent is an adjective and describes the noun-extended sales slump.
Recently extended sales slump-It implies that among several sales slumps, you are more concerned with the recently extend one. Recently is an adverb here and modifies only "extended".

These are the problems with B and C.
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2014, 03:34
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IMO A,

1) since the seven retailer is singular, therefore usage of plural their is incorrect. hence option d and e are out.
2) usage of past perfect tense is correct as reporting of problems happened earlier and the retailer's decision of liquidation happened later.
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2014, 03:40
manpreetsingh86 wrote:
IMO A,

1) since the seven retailer is singular, therefore usage of plural their is incorrect. hence option d and e are out.
2) usage of past perfect tense is correct as reporting of problems happened earlier and the retailer's decision of liquidation happened later.


I am still unable to understand the use of past perfect tense!
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2014, 07:06
@honchos
Obviously you are thinking of the present perfect or simple present tense. If you see deeply, both of them don’t work; a present tense or present perfect is used for something that is still persisting. In this case, the recent slump was extended but the issue is a thing of past now. So to describe it with a present tense or present perfect will be unsuitable. Of course in B, the ‘recently’ is an yet another pin prick
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2014, 07:13
manpreetsingh86 wrote:
IMO A,

1) since the seven retailer is singular, therefore usage of plural their is incorrect. hence option d and e are out.
2) usage of past perfect tense is correct as reporting of problems happened earlier and the retailer's decision of liquidation happened later.


decision of liquidation happened later: this decision is happening in present not in past.

For past perfect two comparing even should happen in past time Line.

In our case one event is in past and one in present. Thats my point Boss.
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2014, 08:08
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The recent extended sales slump was in the past; the retailer’s saying was in the past; that the company would start a three-month liquidation was in the modal past; all of these later events are described in past tense, and are not underlined. So we have to take them per se.
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2014, 06:58
In option 'B',...recently extended sales slump..",verb 'recently' modifies the adjective 'extended' and 'extended' modifies 'sales slump' right?

What is the difference between recent extended sales slump and recently extended sales slump?

Please help me out on this distinction.

Thanks.
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Dec 2014, 08:41
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mvrravikanth wrote:
In option 'B',...recently extended sales slump..",verb 'recently' modifies the adjective 'extended' and 'extended' modifies 'sales slump' right?

What is the difference between recent extended sales slump and recently extended sales slump?

Please help me out on this distinction.

Thanks.



First of all it all depends on the context and meaning of the sentence.

"Recently extended sales" is of the form Adverb - Adjective - Noun.
"Recent extended sales" is of the form Adjective - Adjective - Noun.

We have to understand the meaning here.

If we go by the Second statement then recent modifies sales slump. Though technically "Recent sales slump" is correct but here in this case "Recently" needs to modify "Extended".

There is really no other distinguishing parameter here other than understanding the meaning.

In GMAT, Adjective - Adjective - Noun is correct and Adverb - Adjective - Noun is also correct. But which to use when depends on the context.

Also, other things to look at in the above sentence.

Present + Future -------------------- is correct.
Past + Conditional ---------------------is correct.


Only above conditions are possible.
Present + Conditional---------------------------- is wrong.
Past + Future ------------------------------------ is wrong.


Use of their vs it/its

Here we have to look at the non - underlined part.

The non underlined part " the seven-store retailer said it would start a three-month liquidation sale in all of its stores"
uses it /its, hence we have to use it in the underlined part. This is the basic rule of pronoun agreement.

Pronoun must refer to the same subject. Here subject is "Seven Store Retailer"
Pronoun must agree in number. It is singular and their is plural. both cant refer to same antecedent "Seven Store Retailer".


Hence, correct OA is A.
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2016, 22:39
Correct me if i'm wrong.

But the reason why i chose A for this Question :

The singular pronoun "its" correctly refers to singular subject "Retailer". "their" is plural , hence we can eliminate D,E
"Recently " is an adverb and cannot modify noun "slump" . Eliminate B, C.

Now my question is would the following sent be correct :
Reporting that one of its many problems "has" been the recent extended sales slump in women's apparel, the seven-store retailer said it would start a three-month liquidation sale in all of its stores.

is it necessary to have the "had been" structure in the following sentence.?
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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2016, 07:59
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cmpunk1990 wrote:
Correct me if i'm wrong.

But the reason why i chose A for this Question :

The singular pronoun "its" correctly refers to singular subject "Retailer". "their" is plural , hence we can eliminate D,E
"Recently " is an adverb and cannot modify noun "slump" . Eliminate B, C.

Now my question is would the following sent be correct :
Reporting that one of its many problems "has" been the recent extended sales slump in women's apparel, the seven-store retailer said it would start a three-month liquidation sale in all of its stores.

is it necessary to have the "had been" structure in the following sentence.?


The verb "had been" is within a statement ("said") that happened in the past. This implies that the verb "had been" occurred prior to another verb in the past "said". Hence past perfect is mandatory.

For example:

1. I say that I was happy, but I will be sad.... correct
2. I said that I had been happy, but I would be sad.. correct
3. I said that I was happy, but I will be sad... wrong

Whenever a verb is within a statement in past, we need to take the verb one step back, i.e. simple past would become past perfect, future (will) would become conditional tense (would).
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Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Feb 2017, 11:16
Saw the below clear response by ManhattanGMAT Staff. Thought I should repost it. Because the answers here weren't very clear for me on why it should be "had" and not "has". See original thread here: https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/foru ... -t763.html

*******************************************************************
The perfect tenses, though used infrequently on the GMAT, often induce this type of confusion. Remember, the present perfect is used when an event began at some time in the past and continues to the present moment, while the past perfect indicates a completed past event that happened before a second completed past event. In the cited example, the verb "said" in the non-underlined section of the sentence is a past tense verb. In order to indicate that the sales slump occurred prior to this past announcement, the past perfect tense is necessary.

A second approach would have been to focus on the recent/recently split. It is nonsensical that a retailer would INTENTIONALLY extend a sales slump. However, this is exactly what is suggested by the adverb "recently," which modifies the adjective "extended." The sentence should instead include the adjective "recent," which correctly describes the slump. Thus, answer choices B and C are eliminated. From there, the its/their pronoun split is relatively straightforward. Since the subject of the sentence is the singular "retailer," the singular pronoun "its" is correct.

The credited response is A.

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Re: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Feb 2017, 04:41
Sameer wrote:
Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended sales slump in women's apparel, the seven-store retailer said it would start a three-month liquidation sale in all of its stores.

(A) its many problems had been the recent
(B) its many problems has been the recently
(C) its many problems is the recently
(D) their many problems is the recent
(E) their many problems had been the recent


Responding to a pm:

Quote:
Please explain how come 'recent' is correct in modifying an adverb and not 'recently'

Also is 'has' more appropriate here than 'had' since if the problem is ended then liquidation is happening because the problem is presently being a problem not in the past


"recent" is modifying "extended sales slump", that is, a kind of sales slump. Basically, it is modifying "slump" i.e. a noun. So you will use an adjective.

Look at the skeleton of the sentence:

Reporting that ..., the seven-store retailer said ...

The main verb is "said" which is in past tense. Hence, the extended sales slump had been a problem before they reported it. So the use of past perfect is appropriate here. You will use "had".
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Re: QOTD: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Mar 2018, 04:03
Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended sales slump in women's apparel, the seven-store retailer said it would start a three-month liquidation sale in all of its stores.

(A) its many problems had been the recent -Correct. Said is past so usage of had is correct
(B) its many problems has been the recently - Has is wrong;we need had. Recently is wrong; we need recent (adj) to modify sales.
(C) its many problems is the recently - is is wrong. Recently is wrong
(D) their many problems is the recent - their is wrong. Is is wrong.
(E) their many problems had been the recent -their is wrong
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1. Useful Formulae, Concepts and Tricks-Quant | 2. e-GMAT's ALL SC Compilation | 3. LSAT RC compilation | 4. Actual LSAT CR collection by Broal | 5. QOTD RC (Carcass) | 6. Challange OG RC | 7. GMAT Prep Challenge RC

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Re: QOTD: Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent &nbs [#permalink] 13 Mar 2018, 04:03
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Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent extended

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