GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 24 Jun 2018, 13:19

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Sentence Correction: Verbs tenses notes

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
6 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 06 Dec 2016
Posts: 10
Location: India
Schools: ISB '18
GMAT 1: 700 Q50 V34
GPA: 3.5
WE: Engineering (Energy and Utilities)
Sentence Correction: Verbs tenses notes [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Apr 2017, 09:16
6
3
After struggling a lot and thoroughly assimilating Verb tenses, I have prepared some bullet points which may be helpful for revising the same.
Tenses

Simple tenses:
1. Simple present tense: Used to describe
* a fact that is still valid today.
* A general practice or habit.
2. Simple past tense: Is used to describe
* Facts that happened in the past but are not valid in the present
* Events that happened in the past
3. Simple future tense: Used to describe
* Facts that will happen in the future
* Events that will happen in the future

Progressive/Continuous tenses:
1. Present Continuous tense: Used to describe
* Events ongoing right now
* If we go and check this event would be happening right now
2. Past continuous tense: Used to describe
* An event that was ongoing/happening in the past till another event in the past interrupted it
3. Future continuous tense: Used to describe
* An event that will be happening in the future till another event occurs
* An ongoing event that is happening now and will continue to happen in the future also. e.g.. Teachers will be taking summer classes throughout the summers.

Perfect tenses:
1. Present prefect tense: Used to describe
* Continues even now: An event that started sometime before present and continue in the current time. e.g. I have practiced yoga for 2 years now.
* Continuing effect: An event that occurred in the past and has its effects in the present till now. e.g. Maid has cleaned the kitchen thoroughly.
* Indefinite time: An event that took place at an indefinite time in the past. e.g. Amy has visited Europe.
* NOTE: “Since” and “Within” when used in time context always, present perfect tense can be used. e.g. Since last year, nobody has seen Amy.
2. Past perfect tense: Used to describe
* Two related events that happened in the past. The one that happened earlier is written in past perfect tense and the one that happened later is written in Simple past tense.
* Past perfect tense is optional if sequence indicators are present such as before, after, etc.
* Past perfect is not to be used when there is no sequencing requirement or there is only one event.
3. Future perfect tense: Used to describe
* Two events that will occur in future at different time
* Simple present/Simple future tense is used to present the event that happens later and future perfect to present the event that happens earlier.
* Future perfect is not to be used when there is no sequencing requirement or there is only one event.

Hope you guys find it helpful.
If you like the post kindly share kudos..!!
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Apr 2017
Posts: 2
Re: Sentence Correction: Verbs tenses notes [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 May 2017, 23:39
A really helpful post for understanding the basics of tenses.

Keep it up.



Ssingh1807 wrote:
After struggling a lot and thoroughly assimilating Verb tenses, I have prepared some bullet points which may be helpful for revising the same.
Tenses

Simple tenses:
1. Simple present tense: Used to describe
* a fact that is still valid today.
* A general practice or habit.
2. Simple past tense: Is used to describe
* Facts that happened in the past but are not valid in the present
* Events that happened in the past
3. Simple future tense: Used to describe
* Facts that will happen in the future
* Events that will happen in the future

Progressive/Continuous tenses:
1. Present Continuous tense: Used to describe
* Events ongoing right now
* If we go and check this event would be happening right now
2. Past continuous tense: Used to describe
* An event that was ongoing/happening in the past till another event in the past interrupted it
3. Future continuous tense: Used to describe
* An event that will be happening in the future till another event occurs
* An ongoing event that is happening now and will continue to happen in the future also. e.g.. Teachers will be taking summer classes throughout the summers.

Perfect tenses:
1. Present prefect tense: Used to describe
* Continues even now: An event that started sometime before present and continue in the current time. e.g. I have practiced yoga for 2 years now.
* Continuing effect: An event that occurred in the past and has its effects in the present till now. e.g. Maid has cleaned the kitchen thoroughly.
* Indefinite time: An event that took place at an indefinite time in the past. e.g. Amy has visited Europe.
* NOTE: “Since” and “Within” when used in time context always, present perfect tense can be used. e.g. Since last year, nobody has seen Amy.
2. Past perfect tense: Used to describe
* Two related events that happened in the past. The one that happened earlier is written in past perfect tense and the one that happened later is written in Simple past tense.
* Past perfect tense is optional if sequence indicators are present such as before, after, etc.
* Past perfect is not to be used when there is no sequencing requirement or there is only one event.
3. Future perfect tense: Used to describe
* Two events that will occur in future at different time
* Simple present/Simple future tense is used to present the event that happens later and future perfect to present the event that happens earlier.
* Future perfect is not to be used when there is no sequencing requirement or there is only one event.

Hope you guys find it helpful.
If you like the post kindly share kudos..!!
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 05 Nov 2016
Posts: 87
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Sentence Correction: Verbs tenses notes [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 May 2017, 13:04
Ssingh1807 wrote:
After struggling a lot and thoroughly assimilating Verb tenses, I have prepared some bullet points which may be helpful for revising the same.
Tenses

Simple tenses:
1. Simple present tense: Used to describe
* a fact that is still valid today.
* A general practice or habit.
2. Simple past tense: Is used to describe
* Facts that happened in the past but are not valid in the present
* Events that happened in the past
3. Simple future tense: Used to describe
* Facts that will happen in the future
* Events that will happen in the future

Progressive/Continuous tenses:
1. Present Continuous tense: Used to describe
* Events ongoing right now
* If we go and check this event would be happening right now
2. Past continuous tense: Used to describe
* An event that was ongoing/happening in the past till another event in the past interrupted it
3. Future continuous tense: Used to describe
* An event that will be happening in the future till another event occurs
* An ongoing event that is happening now and will continue to happen in the future also. e.g.. Teachers will be taking summer classes throughout the summers.

Perfect tenses:
1. Present prefect tense: Used to describe
* Continues even now: An event that started sometime before present and continue in the current time. e.g. I have practiced yoga for 2 years now.
* Continuing effect: An event that occurred in the past and has its effects in the present till now. e.g. Maid has cleaned the kitchen thoroughly.
* Indefinite time: An event that took place at an indefinite time in the past. e.g. Amy has visited Europe.
* NOTE: “Since” and “Within” when used in time context always, present perfect tense can be used. e.g. Since last year, nobody has seen Amy.
2. Past perfect tense: Used to describe
* Two related events that happened in the past. The one that happened earlier is written in past perfect tense and the one that happened later is written in Simple past tense.
* Past perfect tense is optional if sequence indicators are present such as before, after, etc.
* Past perfect is not to be used when there is no sequencing requirement or there is only one event.
3. Future perfect tense: Used to describe
* Two events that will occur in future at different time
* Simple present/Simple future tense is used to present the event that happens later and future perfect to present the event that happens earlier.
* Future perfect is not to be used when there is no sequencing requirement or there is only one event.

Hope you guys find it helpful.
If you like the post kindly share kudos..!!



Thank you and great effort to prepare and to share these.
_________________

Kudos are always welcome ... as well your suggestions

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 06 Dec 2016
Posts: 10
Location: India
Schools: ISB '18
GMAT 1: 700 Q50 V34
GPA: 3.5
WE: Engineering (Energy and Utilities)
Re: Sentence Correction: Verbs tenses notes [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 May 2017, 20:22
Thanks.. Glad to know that u found it helpful


Sent from my iPhone using GMAT Club Forum
Re: Sentence Correction: Verbs tenses notes   [#permalink] 20 May 2017, 20:22
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Sentence Correction: Verbs tenses notes

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.