GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 08 Jul 2020, 01:54

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
RSM Erasmus Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 26 Mar 2013
Posts: 2472
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
Schools: Erasmus
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jun 2019, 08:17
1
AjiteshArun wrote:
Mo2men wrote:
Hi AjiteshArun

I think I bumped once in OG in same construction (Such + Noun+ as + Nouns-examples of first noun) . I think even generally accepted in English language.
Hi Mo2men,

You're absolutely right. My "yes" was for "can such and as be separated". The official question I linked to is an example of that.


Thanks AjiteshArun for you care. I misunderstood 'yes' in first post.
SVP
SVP
avatar
V
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 1939
GMAT ToolKit User
Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jun 2019, 13:10
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
E. Since the end of the recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs.

This looks good! The verb, pronoun, and meaning errors are all fixed in (E), so this one is the correct answer.

GMATNinja
It seems that E is NOT a sentence at all. Could you help me to figure out the structure of E?
Here is the core after removing the modifier part-->
Quote:
Since the end of the recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs.

The core is:
......have risen to five-year highs. ;)

Here is an example:
Since the end of the hostile relationship, Mr. X has sent a gift to Mr. Y.
Since it is the end of the hostile relationship, Mr. X has sent a gift to Mr. Y.
So, don't you think that the pink one is wrong and the blue one is correct?
With out an introductory "it is" how does the sentence make sense?
With out "it is" after "Since" in the official correct sentence (E), all the parts start with "since" till "cheese" will be modifier parts, won't it?
Thanks__
_________________
CEO
CEO
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 3320
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jun 2019, 17:33
The subject-verb pair in E is:

Since the end of the recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs.
_________________
SVP
SVP
avatar
V
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 1939
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jun 2019, 17:47
What is the role of "recent........recession" for this sentence? Is it modifier? If yes, what types of modifier it is?
AjiteshArun wrote:
The subject-verb pair in E is:

Since the end of the recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs.


Posted from my mobile device
_________________
CEO
CEO
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 3320
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jun 2019, 18:10
Asad wrote:
What is the role of "recent........recession" for this sentence? Is it modifier? If yes, what types of modifier it is?
That part of the sentence is:

Since (preposition) the end (noun) of (preposition) the recent, extended recession (noun) (recent and extended are both adjectives for the noun recession)

Since the end of something...

The end + (of + noun phrase) is just a bigger noun phrase.

Since something...

Another example:
Since yesterday
_________________
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 19 Nov 2018
Posts: 7
Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jan 2020, 07:45
The moment we read word "SINCE", we know it will be followed by present perfect tense.

Only C & E option has present perfect verb.

option C - Price of commodities at bla bla bla...., including that (that refers to price) of such niche...... >>>> two times price word is unnecessary
option E - Price of commodities at bla bla bla....... including bla bla bla

My answer would be E .
Easy question !
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 23 Nov 2018
Posts: 248
GMAT 1: 650 Q49 V28
GPA: 4
Reviews Badge
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Feb 2020, 05:30
souvik101990 wrote:
Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.


A. recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.

B. recently extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

C. recent, extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including that of such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year high levels.

D. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

E. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs.


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 25: Sentence Correction


Subscribe to GMAT Question of the Day: E-mail | RSS
For All QOTD Questions Click Here



what role does ",extended recession," play in this sentence? i'm guessing its an appositive? but usually phrases or terms in a comma pair are meant to be non essential however in this case extended recession is essential--- is the comma pair okay? and when is matter within a comma pair considered non essential or essential?
_________________
.
Director
Director
avatar
P
Joined: 14 Dec 2019
Posts: 673
Location: Poland
GMAT 1: 570 Q41 V27
WE: Engineering (Consumer Electronics)
Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Feb 2020, 06:04
1
sampriya wrote:
souvik101990 wrote:
Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.


A. recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.

B. recently extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

C. recent, extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including that of such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year high levels.

D. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

E. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs.


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 25: Sentence Correction


Subscribe to GMAT Question of the Day: E-mail | RSS
For All QOTD Questions Click Here



what role does ",extended recession," play in this sentence? i'm guessing its an appositive? but usually phrases or terms in a comma pair are meant to be non essential however in this case extended recession is essential--- is the comma pair okay? and when is matter within a comma pair considered non essential or essential?


My views :-

extended recession can not be an appositive here since its not a replacement for anything. Appositives stand for other nouns (touching noun) which can be replaced. There is none in this sentence.

Recent and extended are adjectives for recession; what the sentence means is that it was an extended recession which was recent. Therefore we need recent, extended recession.

in case of recently extended recession, recently will act as an adverb and will mean that recession was recently extended
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 27 Feb 2017
Posts: 12
Location: Spain
Concentration: Finance
Schools: HBS
GMAT 1: 700 Q46 V40
GPA: 3.74
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Feb 2020, 05:52
GMATNinja wrote:
This is fun, we're already seeing some disagreement on this one!

There are a bunch of moving parts on this question, but one of the major issues is the verb tense. "Since the end of the recession..." requires present perfect tense. Other than that, we have some fun stuff with pronouns ("that of") and some little meaning-based issues.

Quote:
A. recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.

The verb tense is OK here, but there are a couple of weird bits. "Recently extended recession" doesn't really make a whole ton of sense, considering that we know that the recession is already over. (Head-nod to this official GMAT question with a similar phrase in it.) "Five-year high levels" isn't necessarily wrong, but it's definitely not ideal: "five-year highs" is much clearer.

If you're not totally certain about these two issues, you could be conservative and hang onto (A) for now, but we'll see that there's a better choice below.

Quote:
B. recently extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

The "recently extended recession" issue is the same as in (A). And more importantly, the verb tense is definitely wrong: "Since the end of the recession... prices rose" doesn't work, since we need present perfect tense here ("have risen") to indicate that the action continues into the present. Eliminate (B).

Notice also that there's no reason to care about the difference between "each" and "all", since those words are not subjects, and therefore do not affect the form of the verb.

Quote:
C. recent, extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including that of such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year high levels.

I'm still not crazy about "five-year high levels", but the bigger issue here is the pronoun phrase "that of." "That" is a singular pronoun here, but it's clearly trying to refer back to the plural noun "prices." Eliminate (C).

Quote:
D. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

(D) has the same verb error as we saw in (B). So we can ditch (D) as well.
Quote:
E. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs.

This looks good! The verb, pronoun, and meaning errors are all fixed in (E), so this one is the correct answer.


Hi GMATNinja,

I went with option A and eliminated option E because I thought there was the following antecedent issue in option E:


… recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs

I thought that prices was the main noun, the pink portion was a modifier to the main noun, and therefore the green portion was modifying prices, not commodities. That is why I thought the green portion was wrong: "the prices […], including such agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese,"

I see that we must accept that the green portion is not modifying Prices, but Commodities. How can we test for this kind of issues?
Thanks!
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 14 Nov 2018
Posts: 21
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Feb 2020, 13:23
Hello sirGMATNinja. Can we eliminate A for verb reasons. Since *since* requires has/have + pp form, is have been rising in A correct?? Thnx in advance for the help.

Posted from my mobile device
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 09 Nov 2016
Posts: 79
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Feb 2020, 13:38
What is the difference between “prices of all commodities” and “ prices for each of the commodities “ ? Doesn’t option e deviates the meaning

Posted from my mobile device
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
V
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3572
Location: United States (CO)
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Feb 2020, 07:44
quantrace wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
This is fun, we're already seeing some disagreement on this one!

There are a bunch of moving parts on this question, but one of the major issues is the verb tense. "Since the end of the recession..." requires present perfect tense. Other than that, we have some fun stuff with pronouns ("that of") and some little meaning-based issues.

Quote:
A. recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.

The verb tense is OK here, but there are a couple of weird bits. "Recently extended recession" doesn't really make a whole ton of sense, considering that we know that the recession is already over. (Head-nod to this official GMAT question with a similar phrase in it.) "Five-year high levels" isn't necessarily wrong, but it's definitely not ideal: "five-year highs" is much clearer.

If you're not totally certain about these two issues, you could be conservative and hang onto (A) for now, but we'll see that there's a better choice below.

Quote:
B. recently extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

The "recently extended recession" issue is the same as in (A). And more importantly, the verb tense is definitely wrong: "Since the end of the recession... prices rose" doesn't work, since we need present perfect tense here ("have risen") to indicate that the action continues into the present. Eliminate (B).

Notice also that there's no reason to care about the difference between "each" and "all", since those words are not subjects, and therefore do not affect the form of the verb.

Quote:
C. recent, extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including that of such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year high levels.

I'm still not crazy about "five-year high levels", but the bigger issue here is the pronoun phrase "that of." "That" is a singular pronoun here, but it's clearly trying to refer back to the plural noun "prices." Eliminate (C).

Quote:
D. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

(D) has the same verb error as we saw in (B). So we can ditch (D) as well.
Quote:
E. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs.

This looks good! The verb, pronoun, and meaning errors are all fixed in (E), so this one is the correct answer.


Hi GMATNinja,

I went with option A and eliminated option E because I thought there was the following antecedent issue in option E:


… recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs

I thought that prices was the main noun, the pink portion was a modifier to the main noun, and therefore the green portion was modifying prices, not commodities. That is why I thought the green portion was wrong: "the prices […], including such agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese,"

I see that we must accept that the green portion is not modifying Prices, but Commodities. How can we test for this kind of issues?
Thanks!

Choice (A) has the exact same "issue". In fact, ALL five choices do! Sure, there's a bit of ambiguity there -- maybe the "including..." phrase could modify "prices". But since all five choices have the same tiny bit of ambiguity, we don't have to worry about it! Also, in this case, it's fairly obvious that the "major commodities", not the "prices", include agricultural goods.

Unfortunately, there are no concrete rules for this sort of thing, and I certainly wouldn't immediately eliminate something just because of mild ambiguity. If you can eliminate choices that break obvious rules (i.e. subject-verb or pronoun agreement), great. Otherwise, you simply have to compare what's left and see if there are any significant meaning differences between the answer choices.

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutors @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | YouTube | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
V
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3572
Location: United States (CO)
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Mar 2020, 09:13
1
abhishek001 wrote:
Hello sirGMATNinja. Can we eliminate A for verb reasons. Since *since* requires has/have + pp form, is have been rising in A correct?? Thnx in advance for the help.

Posted from my mobile device

In a bubble, there's nothing inherently wrong with "have been rising". Stripping out some modifiers and reordering choice (A), we have, "Prices have been rising since the end of the recession." This implies that the prices started to rise at the end of the recession and that the prices are still rising in the present. There's nothing wrong with that.

But "... have been rising to five-year high levels" is a bit confusing. Does that mean that prices are currently at five-year highs? Or are the prices still approaching five-year highs? And choice (A) has some other issues, as described in this post.

aepmk wrote:
What is the difference between “prices of all commodities” and “ prices for each of the commodities “ ? Doesn’t option e deviates the meaning

Posted from my mobile device

There is a subtle distinction between "prices for all commodities" and "prices for each of the commodities". You can argue that "each" is more appropriate because it emphasizes the fact that we are talking about individual prices for each individual commodity (instead of referring to the commodities collectively).

Luckily, as explained in this post, we don't need to worry about that distinction, so I wouldn't worry too much about it. :)
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutors @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | YouTube | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 09 Nov 2016
Posts: 79
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Mar 2020, 09:22
1
GMATNinja wrote:
abhishek001 wrote:
Hello sirGMATNinja. Can we eliminate A for verb reasons. Since *since* requires has/have + pp form, is have been rising in A correct?? Thnx in advance for the help.

Posted from my mobile device

In a bubble, there's nothing inherently wrong with "have been rising". Stripping out some modifiers and reordering choice (A), we have, "Prices have been rising since the end of the recession." This implies that the prices started to rise at the end of the recession and that the prices are still rising in the present. There's nothing wrong with that.

But "... have been rising to five-year high levels" is a bit confusing. Does that mean that prices are currently at five-year highs? Or are the prices still approaching five-year highs? And choice (A) has some other issues, as described in this post.

aepmk wrote:
What is the difference between “prices of all commodities” and “ prices for each of the commodities “ ? Doesn’t option e deviates the meaning

Posted from my mobile device

There is a subtle distinction between "prices for all commodities" and "prices for each of the commodities". You can argue that "each" is more appropriate because it emphasizes the fact that we are talking about individual prices for each individual commodity (instead of referring to the commodities collectively).

Luckily, as explained in this post, we don't need to worry about that distinction, so I wouldn't worry too much about it. :)

Isn’t there a difference in meaning between “have been rising to “ and “ have risen to “ ?
Director
Director
User avatar
P
Joined: 08 Aug 2017
Posts: 751
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Mar 2020, 15:56
GMATNinja!

I have a issue with option E.
I do agree that option E is most perfect choice but don't you think that it should be "price of each of the commodities" instead of "prices for each of the commodities".
Each commodities is referring a singular entity so I need price here.

Please help me clear this issue.

GMATNinja wrote:
abhishek001 wrote:
Hello sirGMATNinja. Can we eliminate A for verb reasons. Since *since* requires has/have + pp form, is have been rising in A correct?? Thnx in advance for the help.

Posted from my mobile device

In a bubble, there's nothing inherently wrong with "have been rising". Stripping out some modifiers and reordering choice (A), we have, "Prices have been rising since the end of the recession." This implies that the prices started to rise at the end of the recession and that the prices are still rising in the present. There's nothing wrong with that.

But "... have been rising to five-year high levels" is a bit confusing. Does that mean that prices are currently at five-year highs? Or are the prices still approaching five-year highs? And choice (A) has some other issues, as described in this post.

aepmk wrote:
What is the difference between “prices of all commodities” and “ prices for each of the commodities “ ? Doesn’t option e deviates the meaning

Posted from my mobile device

There is a subtle distinction between "prices for all commodities" and "prices for each of the commodities". You can argue that "each" is more appropriate because it emphasizes the fact that we are talking about individual prices for each individual commodity (instead of referring to the commodities collectively).

Luckily, as explained in this post, we don't need to worry about that distinction, so I wouldn't worry too much about it. :)
Manager
Manager
User avatar
P
Joined: 18 Jan 2018
Posts: 179
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, International Business
Schools: CBS '22, ISB, Ivey '22
GPA: 3.27
WE: Operations (Other)
CAT Tests
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Mar 2020, 20:52
Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.

The sentence begins with Since, the tense that follows should be have+verb. Eliminate B and D.

A. recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been to five-year high levels. Are the prices still rising? I am not sure. The sentence does not tell me whether the prices are continuing to rise.

B. recently extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

C. recent, extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including that of such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year high levels.

D. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.


E. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs.

_________________
Believe!!
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
V
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3572
Location: United States (CO)
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Mar 2020, 07:43
1
GMATNinja wrote:
abhishek001 wrote:
Hello sirGMATNinja. Can we eliminate A for verb reasons. Since *since* requires has/have + pp form, is have been rising in A correct?? Thnx in advance for the help.

Posted from my mobile device

In a bubble, there's nothing inherently wrong with "have been rising". Stripping out some modifiers and reordering choice (A), we have, "Prices have been rising since the end of the recession." This implies that the prices started to rise at the end of the recession and that the prices are still rising in the present. There's nothing wrong with that.

But "... have been rising to five-year high levels" is a bit confusing. Does that mean that prices are currently at five-year highs? Or are the prices still approaching five-year highs? And choice (A) has some other issues, as described in this post.

aepmk wrote:
What is the difference between “prices of all commodities” and “ prices for each of the commodities “ ? Doesn’t option e deviates the meaning

Posted from my mobile device

There is a subtle distinction between "prices for all commodities" and "prices for each of the commodities". You can argue that "each" is more appropriate because it emphasizes the fact that we are talking about individual prices for each individual commodity (instead of referring to the commodities collectively).

Luckily, as explained in this post, we don't need to worry about that distinction, so I wouldn't worry too much about it. :)

gvij2017 wrote:
GMATNinja!

I have a issue with option E.
I do agree that option E is most perfect choice but don't you think that it should be "price of each of the commodities" instead of "prices for each of the commodities".
Each commodities is referring a singular entity so I need price here.

Please help me clear this issue.

As suggested in my last post, using the plural "prices" instead of "price" makes it clear that EACH of the major commodities has its OWN price (and that the commodities don't all share the SAME price). We are referring to multiple individual prices, so the plural "prices" is okay.

aepmk wrote:
Isn’t there a difference in meaning between “have been rising to “ and “ have risen to “ ?

Yes, there is a subtle meaning difference. Again, if we go with "... have been rising to five-year high levels", does that mean that prices are currently at five-year highs? Or are the prices still approaching five-year highs?

If we use "have risen to five-year high levels", we KNOW that the prices have already hit five-year highs. The meaning is more clear if we use "have risen to", so that's another vote in favor of (E).
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutors @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | YouTube | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th   [#permalink] 25 Mar 2020, 07:43

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 37 posts ] 

Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





cron

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne