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Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th

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Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.


A. recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.

B. recently extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

C. recent, extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including that of such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year high levels.

D. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

E. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs.


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Originally posted by souvik101990 on 02 Jun 2017, 09:18.
Last edited by Bunuel on 16 Oct 2018, 04:17, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2017, 09:19
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This is fun, we're already seeing some disagreement on this one!

There are a bunch of moving parts on this question, but one of the major issues is the verb tense. "Since the end of the recession..." requires present perfect tense. Other than that, we have some fun stuff with pronouns ("that of") and some little meaning-based issues.

Quote:
A. recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.

The verb tense is OK here, but there are a couple of weird bits. "Recently extended recession" doesn't really make a whole ton of sense, considering that we know that the recession is already over. (Head-nod to this official GMAT question with a similar phrase in it.) "Five-year high levels" isn't necessarily wrong, but it's definitely not ideal: "five-year highs" is much clearer.

If you're not totally certain about these two issues, you could be conservative and hang onto (A) for now, but we'll see that there's a better choice below.

Quote:
B. recently extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

The "recently extended recession" issue is the same as in (A). And more importantly, the verb tense is definitely wrong: "Since the end of the recession... prices rose" doesn't work, since we need present perfect tense here ("have risen") to indicate that the action continues into the present. Eliminate (B).

Notice also that there's no reason to care about the difference between "each" and "all", since those words are not subjects, and therefore do not affect the form of the verb.

Quote:
C. recent, extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including that of such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year high levels.

I'm still not crazy about "five-year high levels", but the bigger issue here is the pronoun phrase "that of." "That" is a singular pronoun here, but it's clearly trying to refer back to the plural noun "prices." Eliminate (C).

Quote:
D. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

(D) has the same verb error as we saw in (B). So we can ditch (D) as well.
Quote:
E. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs.

This looks good! The verb, pronoun, and meaning errors are all fixed in (E), so this one is the correct answer.
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2018, 09:18
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Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.

'Recently' modifies the adjective extended. However, the text wants to convey is that the recession was the recent one and that it was an extended one. That is the reason two coordinate adjectives such as recent and extended are required.

'Five-year highs' is a correct financial jargon; 'five-year high levels' implies that there is a special level named 'five -year high level.'



A. recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.--- 'recently extended' is wrong diction in the given context.

B. recently extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.--- 'recently extended' is wrong.

C. recent, extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including that of such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year high level -

1. Including 'those of' should have been used rather than 'that of.'
2. five-year high level is not correct diction.

D. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs------ Past tense 'rose' is a wrong verb when since has been used.

E. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs --- correct.

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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 07:14
daagh wrote:
Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.

'Recently' modifies the adjective extended. However, the text wants to convey is that the recession was the recent one and that it was an extended one. That is the reason two coordinate adjectives such as recent and extended are required.

'Five-year highs' is a correct financial jargon; 'five-year high levels' implies that there is a special level named 'five -year high level.'



A. recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.--- 'recently extended' is wrong diction in the given context.

B. recently extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.--- 'recently extended' is wrong.

C. recent, extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including that of such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year high level -

1. Including 'those of' should have been used rather than 'that of.'
2. five-year high level is not correct diction.

D. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs------ Past tense 'rose' is a wrong verb when since has been used.

E. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs --- correct.


Thanks, this explanation is helpful but when I read "recently extended recession" and "recent, extended recession" I don't see the difference in meaning?
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 07:44
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bpdulog, maybe this can help:

I saw the recently extended version of the movie Gladiator.
--> there was a movie, which was recently extended by adding some archive footage or whatever. I saw that thing.

I saw the recent, extended version of the movie Gladiator.
--> there was a recent and extended version of the movie Gladiator that I saw.

Similarly, in this question,

Since the end of the recently extended recession [bla bla]
since the end of [different modifier] recession
--> there was a recession which was extended recently

Since the end of the recent, extended recession [bla bla]
core: since the end of the [modifier] recession
--> there was a recent and extended recession which came to an end...
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 08:13
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bpdulog

Adverbs being modifiers can modify a verb or an adjective but not a noun. In this case, the adverb 'recently' cannot modify recession but only the adjective extended. On the contrary, an adjective cannot modify another adjective but it can modify only a noun. That is the reason both the adjectives 'recent' and 'extended' individually and jointly modify the recession. This is a big difference.
One may frequently encounter such usages in GMAT
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2018, 11:42
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GMATNinja wrote:
This is fun, we're already seeing some disagreement on this one!

There are a bunch of moving parts on this question, but one of the major issues is the verb tense. "Since the end of the recession..." requires present perfect tense. Other than that, we have some fun stuff with pronouns ("that of") and some little meaning-based issues.

Quote:
A. recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.

The verb tense is OK here, but there are a couple of weird bits. "Recently extended recession" doesn't really make a whole ton of sense, considering that we know that the recession is already over. (Head-nod to this official GMAT question with a similar phrase in it.) "Five-year high levels" isn't necessarily wrong, but it's definitely not ideal: "five-year highs" is much clearer.

If you're not totally certain about these two issues, you could be conservative and hang onto (A) for now, but we'll see that there's a better choice below.

Quote:
B. recently extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

The "recently extended recession" issue is the same as in (A). And more importantly, the verb tense is definitely wrong: "Since the end of the recession... prices rose" doesn't work, since we need present perfect tense here ("have risen") to indicate that the action continues into the present. Eliminate (B).

Notice also that there's no reason to care about the difference between "each" and "all", since those words are not subjects, and therefore do not affect the form of the verb.

Quote:
C. recent, extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including that of such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year high levels.

I'm still not crazy about "five-year high levels", but the bigger issue here is the pronoun phrase "that of." "That" is a singular pronoun here, but it's clearly trying to refer back to the plural noun "prices." Eliminate (C).

Quote:
D. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.

(D) has the same verb error as we saw in (B). So we can ditch (D) as well.
Quote:
E. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs.

This looks good! The verb, pronoun, and meaning errors are all fixed in (E), so this one is the correct answer.


Hello GMATNinja,
Can you please explain why "recent" and "extended' are separated by a comma and not by an "and"?
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2018, 13:18
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GMATNinja wrote:
Hello GMATNinja,
Can you please explain why "recent" and "extended' are separated by a comma and not by an "and"?

No problem! If you have two adjectives describing the same noun, it's typically fine to separate those adjectives with a comma. Take a silly example: "The tired, frustrated father lashed out at his daughter, angrily informing the toddler that sea shells are not funny-looking potato chips."

For all intents and purposes, the comma plays the same role that "and" would. (In fact, the test typically offered to determine whether two adjectives can be separated by a comma is whether "and" would work just as well. Because "the tired and frustrated father" is a logical construction, "the tired, frustrated father" is fine, too.)

I hope that helps!
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Feb 2019, 01:40
A and B can be eliminated because of ‘recently’ . That is not the right adjective to use, as it changes the meaning to ‘the recession was recently extended’. C has a clear SV disagreement , ‘That’ is referring to ‘prices’. D has the wrong verb tense, we need present perfect.

So, as E is the only option left, it must be correct.
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2019, 08:58
I am concerned with the following expression: "such agricoltural goods as ".... shouldn't it be including agricoltural goods such as? can such and as be separated ?
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2019, 10:42
drwin wrote:
I am concerned with the following expression: "such agricoltural goods as ".... shouldn't it be including agricoltural goods such as? can such and as be separated ?

I too have the same problem with " including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese". I belive it would be right if we replace as with like, i.e. " including such niche agricultural goods like orange juice and cheese". For this question I still belive A would be a better option.
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2019, 19:58
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drwin wrote:
I am concerned with the following expression: "such agricoltural goods as ".... shouldn't it be including agricoltural goods such as? can such and as be separated ?
Yes. This official question does the same thing.
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2019, 20:00
krishnabalu wrote:
I too have the same problem with " including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese". I belive it would be right if we replace as with like, i.e. " including such niche agricultural goods like orange juice and cheese". For this question I still belive A would be a better option.
Experts can you help?
No. Such... like is not correct. Take a look at the official question that I linked to in the previous post. This post discusses the issues to look out for in that question.
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 24 May 2019, 02:50
daagh wrote:
Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.

'Recently' modifies the adjective extended. However, the text wants to convey is that the recession was the recent one and that it was an extended one. That is the reason two coordinate adjectives such as recent and extended are required.

'Five-year highs' is a correct financial jargon; 'five-year high levels' implies that there is a special level named 'five -year high level.'



A. recently extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, have been rising to five-year high levels.--- 'recently extended' is wrong diction in the given context.

B. recently extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs.--- 'recently extended' is wrong.

C. recent, extended recession, prices for all of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including that of such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year high level -

1. Including 'those of' should have been used rather than 'that of.'
2. five-year high level is not correct diction.

D. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including niche agricultural goods such as orange juice and cheese, rose to five-year highs------ Past tense 'rose' is a wrong verb when since has been used.

E. recent, extended recession, prices for each of the major commodities sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, including such niche agricultural goods as orange juice and cheese, have risen to five-year highs --- correct.



Here, in option A and B, apart from the meaning difference, is there any difference between the usage 'have been' and 'have' ? What is the general difference between the two?

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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2019, 06:12
techloverforever wrote:
Here, in option A and B, apart from the meaning difference, is there any difference between the usage 'have been' and 'have' ? What is the general difference between the two?

Posted from my mobile device

Have you checked out this post? It might help with A and B; if you still have questions, let us know.
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Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 08 Jun 2019, 06:11
GMATNinja wrote:
afa13 wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
Hello GMATNinja,
Can you please explain why "recent" and "extended' are separated by a comma and not by an "and"?

No problem! If you have two adjectives describing the same noun, it's typically fine to separate those adjectives with a comma. Take a silly example: "The tired, frustrated father lashed out at his daughter, angrily informing the toddler that sea shells are not funny-looking potato chips."

For all intents and purposes, the comma plays the same role that "and" would. (In fact, the test typically offered to determine whether two adjectives can be separated by a comma is whether "and" would work just as well. Because "the tired and frustrated father" is a logical construction, "the tired, frustrated father" is fine, too.)

I hope that helps!


Hi GMATNinja

The example that you just mentioned, shouldn’t it be tired *and* frustrated? What you just said goes against the concept of parallelism. If there is a list of 2 things, those 2 things have to be separated by a comma ie A and B.... if there are 3, we have to say ... A, B and C. That is how we know that the list is of 3 things. The comma denotes the end of a list.


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Originally posted by aditliverpoolfc on 08 Jun 2019, 04:46.
Last edited by aditliverpoolfc on 08 Jun 2019, 06:11, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2019, 05:27
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aditliverpoolfc wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
No problem! If you have two adjectives describing the same noun, it's typically fine to separate those adjectives with a comma. Take a silly example: "The tired, frustrated father lashed out at his daughter, angrily informing the toddler that sea shells are not funny-looking potato chips."

For all intents and purposes, the comma plays the same role that "and" would. (In fact, the test typically offered to determine whether two adjectives can be separated by a comma is whether "and" would work just as well. Because "the tired and frustrated father" is a logical construction, "the tired, frustrated father" is fine, too.)

I hope that helps!


Hi GMATNinja

The example that you just mentioned, shouldn’t it be tired *and* frustrated? What you just said goes against the concept of parallelism. If there is a list of 2 things, those 2 things have to be separated by a comma ie A and B.... if there are 3, we have to say ... A, B and C. That is how we know that the list is of 3 things. The comma denotes the end of a list.

Hi AjiteshArun ... any inputs?

Posted from my mobile device

As stated in my earlier post, there's absolutely nothing wrong with separating two adjectives with EITHER a comma or an "and." So both of these are completely fine:

  • The ambitious, intelligent student achieved a 780 on the GMAT.
  • The ambitious and intelligent student achieved a 780 on the GMAT.

Neither of these violate any rules of parallelism. If you see an "and", then it's true that "and" must connect two (or more) elements in the same form. But if we're just talking about a pair of parallel adjectives, there's no rule that says that we need an "and."

I hope this helps!
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2019, 05:36
GMATNinja wrote:
aditliverpoolfc wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
No problem! If you have two adjectives describing the same noun, it's typically fine to separate those adjectives with a comma. Take a silly example: "The tired, frustrated father lashed out at his daughter, angrily informing the toddler that sea shells are not funny-looking potato chips."

For all intents and purposes, the comma plays the same role that "and" would. (In fact, the test typically offered to determine whether two adjectives can be separated by a comma is whether "and" would work just as well. Because "the tired and frustrated father" is a logical construction, "the tired, frustrated father" is fine, too.)

I hope that helps!


Hi GMATNinja

The example that you just mentioned, shouldn’t it be tired *and* frustrated? What you just said goes against the concept of parallelism. If there is a list of 2 things, those 2 things have to be separated by a comma ie A and B.... if there are 3, we have to say ... A, B and C. That is how we know that the list is of 3 things. The comma denotes the end of a list.

Hi AjiteshArun ... any inputs?

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As stated in my earlier post, there's absolutely nothing wrong with separating two adjectives with EITHER a comma or an "and." So both of these are completely fine:

  • The ambitious, intelligent student achieved a 780 on the GMAT.
  • The ambitious and intelligent student achieved a 780 on the GMAT.

Neither of these violate any rules of parallelism. If you see an "and", then it's true that "and" must connect two (or more) elements in the same form. But if we're just talking about a pair of parallel adjectives, there's no rule that says that we need an "and."

I hope this helps!


GMATNinja understood ... thanks a ton ! :)
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2019, 07:50
AjiteshArun wrote:
drwin wrote:
I am concerned with the following expression: "such agricoltural goods as ".... shouldn't it be including agricoltural goods such as? can such and as be separated ?
Yes. This official question does the same thing.


Hi AjiteshArun

I think I bumped once in OG in same construction (Such + Noun+ as + Nouns-examples of first noun) . I think even generally accepted in English language.
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2019, 09:13
Mo2men wrote:
Hi AjiteshArun

I think I bumped once in OG in same construction (Such + Noun+ as + Nouns-examples of first noun) . I think even generally accepted in English language.
Hi Mo2men,

You're absolutely right. My "yes" was for "can such and as be separated". The official question I linked to is an example of that.
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Re: Since the end of the recently extended recession, prices for all of th   [#permalink] 08 Jun 2019, 09:13

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