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The cost of 3 chocolates, 5 biscuits, and 5 ice creams is

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The cost of 3 chocolates, 5 biscuits, and 5 ice creams is  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 12 Jul 2013, 09:40
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Question Stats:

25% (02:09) correct 75% (02:19) wrong based on 743 sessions

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The cost of 3 chocolates, 5 biscuits, and 5 ice creams is 195. What is the cost of 7 chocolates, 11 biscuits and 9 ice creams?

(1) The cost of 5 chocolates, 7 biscuits and 3 ice creams is 217.
(2) The cost of 4 chocolates, 1 biscuit and 3 ice creams is 141.

Originally posted by Onell on 20 Mar 2011, 07:56.
Last edited by Bunuel on 12 Jul 2013, 09:40, edited 1 time in total.
Edited the OA.
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Re: The cost  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2011, 08:12
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5
Given: 3C + 5B + 5I = 195---------(a)
7C + 11B + 9I = ?-----------------(b)
So we need to look for 4C + 6B + 4I (b-a)

(1). 5C+ 7B + 3I = 217--------------(c)
(a)+(c) gives 8C + 12B + 8I = 412 which is equal to 4C + 6B + 4I = 206
Thus sufficient.

(2). 4C+1B+3I = 141
Not sufficient.

Answer is A
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Re: The cost  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2011, 08:26
Onell wrote:
The cost of 3 chocolates, 5 biscuits, and 5 ice creams is 195. What is the cost of 7 chocolates, 11 biscuits and 9 ice creams?

(A) The cost of 5 chocolates, 7 biscuits and 3 ice creams is 217.
(B) The cost of 4 chocolates, 1 biscuit and 3 ice creams is 141.


We know that 3C+5B+5I = 195 ........ (1)

We need to find 7C+11B+9I = ? ........ (2)

Statement 1 tells us 5C+7B+3I = 217...... (3). Whatever we do with (1) and (3), we cant get to (2), so insufficient

Statement 2 tells us 4C+1B+3I = 141...... (4). Whatever we do with (1) and (4), we cant get to (2), so insufficient again

Combining the two statements, we have three unique equations and three variables, so we can solve for C, B and I and can find the required value in (2).

So, Answer C.
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Re: The cost  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2011, 10:39
Given 3C+5B+5I = 195

1. Not Sufficient

Not enough to derive the value of expression

2. Not Sufficient

Not enough to derive the value of expression




together, we got 3 different equations and we should be able to find C,B and I and hence enough to find out the asked expression value.
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Re: The cost  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2011, 21:15
Given -> 3C + 5B + 5I = 195

7C + 11B + 9C = ?

From (1) 5C + 7B + 3I = 217, not sufficient

From (2) 4C + B + 3I = 141, not sufficient

But from(1) and (2), 3 variables and 3 different equations, so sufficient.

Answer - C.
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Re: The cost  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2011, 09:12
nimisha wrote:
Given: 3C + 5B + 5I = 195---------(a)
7C + 11B + 9I = ?-----------------(b)
So we need to look for 4C + 6B + 4I (b-a)

(1). 5C+ 7B + 3I = 217--------------(c)
(a)+(c) gives 8C + 12B + 8I = 412 which is equal to 4C + 6B + 4I = 206
Thus sufficient.

(2). 4C+1B+3I = 141
Not sufficient.

Answer is A

Good catch nimisha.
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Re: The cost  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2011, 09:54
nimisha
I see a continuous pattern in GMAT questions and I had this intuition that this is a "lone wolf" - I mean one choice alone is sufficient. Which one I can't guess. So let me ask you - is addition / subtraction the only way to get around the coefficients or is there some other way?? Just add them and see if it works. If not subtract them and see if it works. Any other way??

nimisha wrote:
Given: 3C + 5B + 5I = 195---------(a)
7C + 11B + 9I = ?-----------------(b)
So we need to look for 4C + 6B + 4I (b-a)

(1). 5C+ 7B + 3I = 217--------------(c)
(a)+(c) gives 8C + 12B + 8I = 412 which is equal to 4C + 6B + 4I = 206
Thus sufficient.

(2). 4C+1B+3I = 141
Not sufficient.

Answer is A
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Re: The cost  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2011, 10:23
2
Well, addition/subtraction plus some intuition can help to get down to the solution. while doing the math, we need to have some idea as to what might lead to the possible solution. In this one, we are given one equation and asked for the value for the second one, so here you would want to figure out the value for the difference one. With this knowledge you can start adding/subtracting... I dont know if there is a sure shot way to proceed for such questions (would defintly like to know if there is one)..
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Re: The cost  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2011, 12:28
three variable, we will need 3 equations to solve the question , option A and B not similar to each other or with the given information.

Therefore answer = C
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Re: The cost  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2011, 13:35
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I am with Nimisha. If you are doing really well in GMAT and get this kind of questions, you should start cross-checking it with addition and subtraction.
The answer is A.
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The cost of 3 chocolates, 5 biscuits, and 5 ice creams is  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2014, 01:46
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My approach to this problem:

Given: 3c+ 5b+ 5i = 195(*)
We need to find: 7c+ 11b+ 5i = ?

(1) 5c + 7b + 3i = 217(**) ,
First, (*) - (**) => c+ b+ i = 11(#);
Second, (*) + (**) => 8c + 12b+ 8i = 412 (##);
Finally, (##) - (#) => 7c+ 11b+ 9i = 401

(2) - is obviously insufficient;

The correct answer is A


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Re: The cost of 3 chocolates, 5 biscuits, and 5 ice creams is  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2018, 10:01
just check whether the three are equations are linearly independent or not, by using row transformations on matrix
if LI= insufficient

if LD= sufficient
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Re: The cost of 3 chocolates, 5 biscuits, and 5 ice creams is &nbs [#permalink] 27 Sep 2018, 10:01
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