Last visit was: 25 Jul 2024, 08:12 It is currently 25 Jul 2024, 08:12
Close
GMAT Club Daily Prep
Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History
Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.
Close
Request Expert Reply
Confirm Cancel
SORT BY:
Date
User avatar
Manager
Manager
Joined: 23 Jan 2013
Posts: 99
Own Kudos [?]: 172 [0]
Given Kudos: 41
Concentration: Technology, Other
Schools: Berkeley Haas
GMAT Date: 01-14-2015
WE:Information Technology (Computer Software)
Send PM
User avatar
Manager
Manager
Joined: 10 Sep 2014
Posts: 58
Own Kudos [?]: 268 [0]
Given Kudos: 102
Send PM
Intern
Intern
Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 4
Own Kudos [?]: [0]
Given Kudos: 7
GMAT 1: 600 Q46 V27
Send PM
Manhattan Prep Instructor
Joined: 22 Mar 2011
Posts: 2701
Own Kudos [?]: 7863 [1]
Given Kudos: 56
GMAT 2: 780  Q50  V50
Send PM
Re: The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high [#permalink]
1
Kudos
Expert Reply
josepiusn, it's very dangerous to pull out a few words from a sentence and say that they sound awkward. While this can occasionally help us to find portions with errors, if we can't name an actual error, we should defer judgment and try to find another way to eliminate.

In this case, "could well list" is just fine. "Could well" is just a modifier saying that something very well may happen. In this case, what very well may happen? The service may list the frog as endangered. Here are a few uses of this idiom:

This book is so exciting that it could well become a best-seller.
The criminals were nervous, figuring that the new recruit could well turn out to be an undercover officer.
Another Supreme Court justice could well retire before the next president takes office.
Director
Director
Joined: 09 Jun 2010
Posts: 526
Own Kudos [?]: 525 [0]
Given Kudos: 916
Send PM
Re: The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high [#permalink]
stevegt wrote:
The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high reaches of the Sierra Nevada has become severe enough for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service quite possibly to list it as an endangered species in the near future.

(A) severe enough for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service quite possibly to list it
(B) severe enough so that the United States Fish and Wildlife Service could well list them
(C) severe enough for it quite possibly to be listed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service
(D) so severe that the United States Fish and Wildlife Service could well list it
(E) so severe that they could well be listed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service


this is official question, so we should study it carefully.

i think we can see the pattern in choice A in formal english in newspaper. but the fact that A is wrong suggest that this pattern in choice A is not acceptable in gmat land. we have to take patern in choice D instead.

do you agree with me?
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Status: enjoying
Posts: 5264
Own Kudos [?]: 42145 [1]
Given Kudos: 422
Location: India
WE:Education (Education)
Send PM
Re: The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high [#permalink]
1
Kudos
Expert Reply
Top Contributor
Quote:
The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high reaches of the Sierra Nevada has become severe enough for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service quite possibly to list it as an endangered species in the near future.

'Severe' is an adjective, and 'enough' ( meaning sufficient) is also an adjective; While 'severe' modifies the noun 'decline,' 'enough' modifies 'severe.' An adjective modifying another adjective is technically incorrect. Second, in A, the decline seems to be severing for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and not in general.
Manager
Manager
Joined: 15 Apr 2020
Posts: 182
Own Kudos [?]: 19 [0]
Given Kudos: 2218
GMAT 1: 620 Q45 V30
Send PM
Re: The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high [#permalink]
What "it" in A modify decline or frog??
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
Joined: 03 Oct 2013
Affiliations: CrackVerbal
Posts: 4915
Own Kudos [?]: 7820 [1]
Given Kudos: 221
Location: India
Send PM
Re: The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high [#permalink]
1
Kudos
Top Contributor
AbhishekDhanraJ72 wrote:
What "it" in A modify decline or frog??


Hi Abhishek

Let us put the "it" in the context in which it appears. Reading on, we are told:

...list it as an endangered species...

Clearly, from a logical consistency perspective, "it" being referred to here must refer to a "species", since as per the sentence, "it" could be listed as an endangered "species". From among the possibilities that appear in the sentence earlier, "it" could only refer to the "yellow-legged frog".

"It" here cannot refer to "decline" since "decline" cannot be listed as an endangered species.

Hope this clarifies.
Director
Director
Joined: 29 Jun 2017
Posts: 776
Own Kudos [?]: 401 [0]
Given Kudos: 2198
Send PM
Re: The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high [#permalink]
soneone already have explained the difference between "enough to" and "so... that"
the first mean something goes beyond a definite level
the latter means something reached a definite level

the correct meaning is decline reaches a definite level but not pass a definite level.
Manager
Manager
Joined: 11 May 2020
Posts: 126
Own Kudos [?]: 17 [0]
Given Kudos: 146
Send PM
Re: The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high [#permalink]
KarishmaB GMATNinja

I really wanted to go with D because it seemed like the absolute correct answer, but I eventually did not go with it because if felt the D (and E) brought in new information, saying "SO severe". I have always learned that we cannot change the meaning of the original sentence.

My question for you guys is what do we do in situations exactly like in this question, when the correct answer (D) might be misleading because it brings in new information that was not stated in the sentence (no one said it was SO severe) yet it really looks and feels like the right answer?

The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high reaches of the Sierra Nevada has become severe enough for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service quite possibly to list it as an endangered species in the near future.

(A) severe enough for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service quite possibly to list it
(B) severe enough so that the United States Fish and Wildlife Service could well list them
(C) severe enough for it quite possibly to be listed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service
(D) so severe that the United States Fish and Wildlife Service could well list it
(E) so severe that they could well be listed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Thanks in advance!
Tutor
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 15153
Own Kudos [?]: 66872 [2]
Given Kudos: 436
Location: Pune, India
Send PM
Re: The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high [#permalink]
2
Kudos
Expert Reply
HWPO wrote:
KarishmaB GMATNinja

I really wanted to go with D because it seemed like the absolute correct answer, but I eventually did not go with it because if felt the D (and E) brought in new information, saying "SO severe". I have always learned that we cannot change the meaning of the original sentence.

My question for you guys is what do we do in situations exactly like in this question, when the correct answer (D) might be misleading because it brings in new information that was not stated in the sentence (no one said it was SO severe) yet it really looks and feels like the right answer?

The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high reaches of the Sierra Nevada has become severe enough for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service quite possibly to list it as an endangered species in the near future.

(A) severe enough for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service quite possibly to list it
(B) severe enough so that the United States Fish and Wildlife Service could well list them
(C) severe enough for it quite possibly to be listed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service
(D) so severe that the United States Fish and Wildlife Service could well list it
(E) so severe that they could well be listed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Thanks in advance!


HWPO - There is no reason to think that option (A) is the "original meaning" and if another gives something slightly different, the meaning has changed. Option (A) is just one of the options and has a 20% chance of being correct. There is absolutely nothing special about option (A). There will be one best sentence with meaning that makes sense. That is your answer.

Also "severe enough for" and "so severe that" are similar in meaning. They both give the degree of severity. How severe is it...
"Enough" may "feel" mild and "so severe" may "feel" extremely severe but objectively speaking, they both give the degree of severity = "severe enough for A" or "so severe that A should happen".
CEO
CEO
Joined: 27 Mar 2010
Posts: 3730
Own Kudos [?]: 3541 [1]
Given Kudos: 152
Location: India
Schools: ISB
GPA: 3.31
Send PM
The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high [#permalink]
1
Kudos
Expert Reply
HWPO wrote:
I really wanted to go with D because it seemed like the absolute correct answer, but I eventually did not go with it because if felt the D (and E) brought in new information, saying "SO severe". I have always learned that we cannot change the meaning of the original sentence.

As KarishmaB has already mentioned, so severe isn't really changing the meaning of the original sentence, at least not substantially.

In fact, this pattern is so common (not common enough :) ) on GMAT that you might want to just remember that "so + adjective" is almost always preferable to "adjective + enough". You might want to refer to example-1, example-2, and example-3.
Experts' Global Representative
Joined: 10 Jul 2017
Posts: 5128
Own Kudos [?]: 4694 [0]
Given Kudos: 38
Location: India
GMAT Date: 11-01-2019
Send PM
Re: The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high [#permalink]
Expert Reply
HWPO wrote:
KarishmaB GMATNinja

I really wanted to go with D because it seemed like the absolute correct answer, but I eventually did not go with it because if felt the D (and E) brought in new information, saying "SO severe". I have always learned that we cannot change the meaning of the original sentence.

My question for you guys is what do we do in situations exactly like in this question, when the correct answer (D) might be misleading because it brings in new information that was not stated in the sentence (no one said it was SO severe) yet it really looks and feels like the right answer?

The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high reaches of the Sierra Nevada has become severe enough for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service quite possibly to list it as an endangered species in the near future.

(A) severe enough for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service quite possibly to list it
(B) severe enough so that the United States Fish and Wildlife Service could well list them
(C) severe enough for it quite possibly to be listed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service
(D) so severe that the United States Fish and Wildlife Service could well list it
(E) so severe that they could well be listed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Thanks in advance!


Hello HWPO,

We hope this finds you well.

To answer your query, this sentence is meant to convey a cause-effect relationship between the severity of the frog's decline and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service possibly listing it as an endangered species in the near future, so the answer choices that use "enough" are inferior. This is because “enough” is used to show “adequacy” and generally not used to show a cause-effect relationship; rather, “so + cause + that + effect” or “so + cause + as to + effect” are some of the preferred constructions for conveying a cause-effect relationship.

We hope this helps.
All the best!
Experts' Global Team
User avatar
Non-Human User
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 17527
Own Kudos [?]: 870 [0]
Given Kudos: 0
Send PM
Re: The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high [#permalink]
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: The decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog in the high [#permalink]
   1   2 
Moderators:
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
6985 posts
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
236 posts