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The high cost of productions is severely limiting which operas are

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The high cost of productions is severely limiting which operas are  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2017, 23:47
1
1
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  75% (hard)

Question Stats:

58% (01:55) correct 42% (02:02) wrong based on 304 sessions

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The high cost of productions is severely limiting which operas are available to the public. These costs necessitate reliance on large corporate sponsors, who in return demand that only the most famous operas be produced. Determining which operas will be produced should rest only with ticket purchasers at the box office, not with large corporate sponsors. If we reduce production budgets so that operas can be supported exclusively by box-office receipts and donations from individuals, then the public will be able to see less famous operas.

Which one of the following, if true, would weaken the argument?

(A) A few ticket purchasers go to the opera for the sake of going to the opera, not to see specific operatic productions.

(B) The reduction of opera production budgets would not reduce the desire of large corporate sponsors to support operas.

(C) Without the support of large corporate sponsors, opera companies could not afford to produce any but the most famous of operas.

(D) Large corporate sponsors will stop supporting opera productions if they are denied control over which operas will be produced.

(E) The combination of individual donations and box-office receipts cannot match the amounts of money obtained through sponsorship by large corporations.

Source: LSAT

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Re: The high cost of productions is severely limiting which operas are  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2017, 19:40
I am up for E ...................As per E without those big guys the opera production cannot happen.So E weakens.
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Re: The high cost of productions is severely limiting which operas are  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2017, 15:02
C
Pattern: Catch 22
IMHO, although a very interesting problem, it is not a very "GMAT like" problem.
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Re: The high cost of productions is severely limiting which operas are  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2017, 17:10
Please post your explanations or use the request verbal experts' reply button to ask specific questions.

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Re: The high cost of productions is severely limiting which operas are  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Dec 2017, 21:07
broall wrote:
The high cost of productions is severely limiting which operas are available to the public. These costs necessitate reliance on large corporate sponsors, who in return demand that only the most famous operas be produced. Determining which operas will be produced should rest only with ticket purchasers at the box office, not with large corporate sponsors. If we reduce production budgets so that operas can be supported exclusively by box-office receipts and donations from individuals, then the public will be able to see less famous operas.

Which one of the following, if true, would weaken the argument?

(A) A few ticket purchasers go to the opera for the sake of going to the opera, not to see specific operatic productions.

(B) The reduction of opera production budgets would not reduce the desire of large corporate sponsors to support operas.

(C) Without the support of large corporate sponsors, opera companies could not afford to produce any but the most famous of operas.

(D) Large corporate sponsors will stop supporting opera productions if they are denied control over which operas will be produced.

(E) The combination of individual donations and box-office receipts cannot match the amounts of money obtained through sponsorship by large corporations.

Source: LSAT


(A) We don't care about the preferences of a FEW opera purchasers

The justification for getting rid of (B) that we don't care whether large corporate sponsors still have a DESIRE to sponsor. We evaluating whether denying them the ABILITY to sponsor would result in the public seeing less famous operas.

I agree that (C) at first feels like cheating ... are we just denying the IF condition from the conclusion?

Not really. The IF condition from the conclusion is that production budgets would be lowered so that box-office and private donations can cover it. Let's say, to make this more concrete, that we only take in $50,000 per show from box-office and private donations.

Fine, then our production budget is set at $50,000. Will we now be staging less famous operas?

No, according to (C). The only operas we could afford without corporate sponsors will be the most famous of operas. So, according to (C) our $50,000 budget will only help us to produce the most famous of operas.

What's hard about interpreting this answer choice correctly is how counterintuitive it seems to me: it's essentially implying that the most famous operas are cheaper to produce than less famous operas are.

(I tend to assume the opposite, even though there's no reason more famous has to mean more expensive.)

As a more general rule of thumb, if you're trying to weaken an argument that's expressed in conditional form ...
IF we do this thing, THEN we get this result

... the test will almost always weaken it with an answer that shows "even if you do this thing, you still WON'T get the result you're seeking".

So I was reading answers looking for, "Which one tells me that, following our plan, we WON'T get less famous operas?"

Seen in this light, only (C) is relevant. None of the others even discuss how famous the operas will be.

(D) We don't care whether large corporate sponsors will or will not support opera productions. The conclusion is conditional, IF budgets can be reduced to the point where there is no need to rely on large corporate sponsors THEN ...
(E) Makes the same mistake as (D). Even if individuals can't match the donations of corporate sponsors, individuals might be able to cover all costs IF production budgets are reduced.
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Re: The high cost of productions is severely limiting which operas are  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2018, 15:02
The high cost of productions is severely limiting which operas are available to the public. These costs necessitate reliance on large corporate sponsors, who in return demand that only the most famous operas be produced. Determining which operas will be produced should rest only with ticket purchasers at the box office, not with large corporate sponsors. If we reduce production budgets so that operas can be supported exclusively by box-office receipts and donations from individuals, then the public will be able to see less famous operas.

Which one of the following, if true, would weaken the argument?
------------------------

Prethinking gives us assumpion that in order to weaken the argument we have to find an option, that says that this
(" operas can be supported exclusively by box-office receipts and donations from individuals") will be not enough.
It is one of the few questions where the right answer just jumps in fron of you.



(A) A few ticket purchasers go to the opera for the sake of going to the opera, not to see specific operatic productions.
Out of scope. It does not say anything about he link between individual donations an production of operas

(B) The reduction of opera production budgets would not reduce the desire of large corporate sponsors to support operas.
Ok, maybe. Still nothing about the link. Moreover. If production's costs are reduced, people will likely see more operas (so it is a strenghethener)

(C) Without the support of large corporate sponsors, opera companies could not afford to produce any but the most famous of operas.
That is it. The righr answer, that jumps at us.
Corporate sponsors are out. So we have only individual sponsors. And money from them will not be enough for less famous operas and even for some of the most famous operas. So peeople will see fewer operas. Weakening.

(D) Large corporate sponsors will stop supporting opera productions if they are denied control over which operas will be produced.
Gives uds nothing. Ok, they will stop, but maybe there will be enough financial support from individual sponcors

(E) The combination of individual donations and box-office receipts cannot match the amounts of money obtained through sponsorship by large corporations.
Sounds like it true. But again - it gives us nothing about the link. Maybe there will be enough financial support from individual sponcors

Source: LSAT
Re: The high cost of productions is severely limiting which operas are &nbs [#permalink] 27 Jul 2018, 15:02
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