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The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes

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The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 11 Sep 2017, 01:36
2
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A
B
C
D
E

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Question Stats:

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The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes resentfully, that he was a small-town Midwesterner who was thrust into a world that was dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than him.

(A) who was thrust into a world that was dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than him a
(B) who had been thrust into a world that was dominated by more wealthy, educated, and polished people than him
(C) who had been thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and people more polished than he was
(D) thrust into a world dominated by more wealthy, educated, and polished people than him
(E) thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than he

Originally posted by hellom3p on 10 Mar 2006, 18:30.
Last edited by broall on 11 Sep 2017, 01:36, edited 1 time in total.
Reformatted question, OAs added
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Dec 2015, 23:49
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This question is skating on very thin ice and hence is unlikely tobe a GMAT candidate.

The debate hinges around than ‘he’ or ‘him’. This is an unending debate that whenever you consider ‘than’ as a preposition, the object pronoun ‘him’ is correct and whenever ‘than’ is used as a conjunction, the subject pronoun ‘he’ is better, as after all, a conjunction joins clauses.

For those who doubt whether ‘he’ is a clause, the argument forwarded is that the actual meaning is ‘he is’ and so good enough. But IMO, I doubt whether GMAT would like to base a question on such a thin difference, as we have seen in so many cases in which GMAC steers clear of controversial issues.

To make life simple, some have suggested that it will be better to write out the full sentence without any ellipsis. So choice C could be an effective answer generally, except that, choice C in this context is using a wrong tense ‘had been’. Why ‘had been’ thrust is wrong here? Because ‘he was a small Midwesterner’, an earlier occurrence than his being thrust into a new world, has been marked by a simple past.

Finally therefore, at gunpoint, perhaps E
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2006, 09:26
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At this point it would be a good idea to discuss the usage of 'than' when making a comparison.

'than' when used to compare two subjects requires a subjective form (he, she, you, they).

e.g. I am taller than she. [she is]

but not always. When comparing objects e.g.

I like him better than she/her.

To use the 'she' form would mean that 'I like him better than she likes him' while 'her' form would mean that 'I like him more than I like her'.

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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2006, 21:21
IMO, usage of "him" is wrong here. It should be "he..."

So we are left with C & E. I'm going with "E".

Nandan,
"...a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and people more polished ..."
This red part coming later is causing uneasiness to me :?
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2006, 04:11
1
vivek123 wrote:
IMO, usage of "him" is wrong here. It should be "he..."

So we are left with C & E. I'm going with "E".

Nandan,
"...a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and people more polished ..."
This red part coming later is causing uneasiness to me :?


If usage of him is incorrect then E is the best option.
But Vivek, could ypu please explain why the usage of him is wrong?
Kindly give me few examples.

Thanks,
Brajesh
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2006, 05:34
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b14kumar wrote:
vivek123 wrote:
IMO, usage of "him" is wrong here. It should be "he..."

So we are left with C & E. I'm going with "E".

Nandan,
"...a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and people more polished ..."
This red part coming later is causing uneasiness to me :?


If usage of him is incorrect then E is the best option.
But Vivek, could ypu please explain why the usage of him is wrong?
Kindly give me few examples.

Thanks,
Brajesh


Hey Brajesh,

Here is an example,

"I am taller than him" -----> Incorrect
"I am taller than he is" -----> Correct


This rule is slightly difficult for non native English speakers (like us) to digest ;)
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2006, 21:31
- the sequence should be 'wealtheir, better-educated and more polished'
We can discard C as it is not parallel.
We can also discard B and D becuase it results in the redundant use of 'more' when a simple wealthier would have done the job

- 'he' is the correct pronoun to use.
We can discard A.

E is the best choice. To read more about whether to use the subject or object pronoun after 'than', read this link: http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/pronoun.asp
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Re: Midwesterner  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2009, 07:15
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hai guys, the answer is E. The explanation is as follows

In comparative expressions (such as "more than" or "better than" or "smarter than") followed by a
pronoun, the case, again, is important. In everyday speech, most people use the objective case
when they should use the subjective case.
Faulty Usage
I liked it better than her.
She does it more than me.
My sisters are smarter than them.
Tip: As a guide to correct usage, in your mind, add the verb that is understood but not stated: I
liked it better than she ["did" is understood]. She does it more than I ["do" is understood]. My
sisters are smarter than they ["are" is understood]
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2012, 08:13
1
alchemist009 wrote:
is it necessary to use past participle in this question. what is the correct form

paula is better shooter than him
or
paula is better shooter than he

this comparison always kills me.....


This is what I do to solve the ambiguity. Put a verb after the pronoun.
1) Paula is a better shooter than he is .... ?
2) Paula is a better shooter than him is .... ?

Which one of the above do you think is correct?

Others might have something better to add.
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jul 2013, 07:59
vivek123 wrote:
b14kumar wrote:
vivek123 wrote:
IMO, usage of "him" is wrong here. It should be "he..."

So we are left with C & E. I'm going with "E".

Nandan,
"...a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and people more polished ..."
This red part coming later is causing uneasiness to me :?


If usage of him is incorrect then E is the best option.
But Vivek, could ypu please explain why the usage of him is wrong?
Kindly give me few examples.

Thanks,
Brajesh


Hey Brajesh,

Here is an example,

"I am taller than him" -----> Incorrect
"I am taller than he is" -----> Correct


This rule is slightly difficult for non native English speakers (like us) to digest ;)


I know this is an old thread but I could not stand a side and not trying to explain this:

the subject in the second clause of the question is "he" so when you compare the subject to someone else it has to be to "he" ex. "he was a small-town ........ dominated by x , y , and more polished than he"
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2013, 16:50
1
galafgon wrote:
vivek123 wrote:
b14kumar wrote:
If usage of him is incorrect then E is the best option.
But Vivek, could ypu please explain why the usage of him is wrong?
Kindly give me few examples.
Hey Brajesh,Here is an example,
"I am taller than him" -----> Incorrect
"I am taller than he is" -----> Correct

This rule is slightly difficult for non native English speakers (like us) to digest ;)
I know this is an old thread but I could not stand a side and not trying to explain this:

the subject in the second clause of the question is "he" so when you compare the subject to someone else it has to be to "he" ex. "he was a small-town ........ dominated by x , y , and more polished than he"
@galafgon,vivek123
If I get rid of extra elements, the sentence to get base sentence
S1:"he was a small-town ........ dominated by x , y , and more polished than he"
S2:"he was a small-town ........ dominated by x , y , andmore polished than he"
S3:"he was more polished than he"
I am really not liking this sentence. It is hard for me to digest that the last "he" in E.

I understand that "I am taller than he" is acceptable owing to ellipsis but as per my perception we are not comparing subjects here.
The comparison is between objects of this sentence(Sub+Verb+obj).
In a parallel eg.: I love chocolates more than candies. Since, here the comparison is happening within objects than subjects.
When I say objects, I mean comparison between more polished people and object version of he(i.e. him).

I would have accepted "he" in sentence: He was better than he [is].
But accepting "he" in sentence is bothersome to me: Small Town Midwestener is was thrust in a world dominated by smarter people than him

Please let me know if I am missing anything here and how to accept this subject version of he than object version of he(him).
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Nov 2013, 21:30
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Hi Joshnit

vis-a vis your request

In essence both usages are correct technically; It all depends upon whether you use than as a conjunction or preposition. If you are using ‘than’ as a subordinate conjunction, joining a main clause and a sub clause, then ‘than he (than he + the elliptical verb) is acceptable.
On the contrary, if you are using ‘than’ as a preposition, then what follows cannot be a clause but simply a noun or pronoun or noun phrase. Now let’s see the topic in question.
The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes resentfully, that he was a small-town Midwesterner who was thrust into a world that was dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than him.

(A) who was thrust into a world that was dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than him
(B) who had been thrust into a world that was dominated by more wealthy, educated, and polished people than him
(C) who had been thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and people more polished than he was
(D) thrust into a world dominated by more wealthy, educated, and polished people than him
(E) thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than he
Here in my opinion, you are comparing wealthier, better and more polished people with some other human being. Now the crux is that wealthier, better educated and more polished people are objects of the preposition ‘by’. So you have to compare wealthier, better educated and more polished with another object namely ‘him’.

Here is yet another way to ascertain this; the reversal test. Let us now interchange both the words and see whether we can get the meaning rightly.

1. dominated by him than by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people
2. dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than he( was)
3. dominated by he ( was ) than by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people
4. dominated by him than by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people

You see choices No 1 and 4 retain the meaning, while 2 and 3 do not

There is yet another view that in sentences, where the verb is originated from the base verb ‘be” such as to be, is, was ,are, were, , will be and the like, and also in the case of verbs such as seem, appear, look, then you use ‘than’ only as a preposition and not as a conjunction

Ex; I am taller than him
I look/ appear/ seem to be taller than him

Hence, by all counts, I would prefer -than him- over other choices.
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Nov 2013, 05:02
There are three choices A, B and D. A can be dropped because the past tense 'was' is not as appropriate as 'had been' to describe something that happened deep in the past.
But D is still better because, it is concise.

By the way, technically I do not see much difference between wealthier or more wealthy except that more wealthy is less common.
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2014, 07:15
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Gnpth wrote:

The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes resentfully, that he was a small-town Midwesterner who was thrust into a world that was dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than him.

(A) who was thrust into a world that was dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than him
(B) who had been thrust into a world that was dominated by more wealthy, educated, and polished people than him
(C) who had been thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and people more polished than he was
(D) thrust into a world dominated by more wealthy, educated, and polished people than him
(E) thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than he


Meaning

The man was always aware of his situation. He knew he was a small town midwesterner thrusted into a world. This world was dominated by people who were wealthier, better educated and more polished than him.

Error analysis
The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes resentfully
that
he was a small-town Midwesterner
who was thrust into a world ---- No error
that
was dominated by wealthier, better-educated- No Error
,and more polished people than him. he /him, In spoken english we always use Him for subject pronouns "He", but in formal english subject pronouns are always to be written as they are

He loves Gmat more than her----Object pronoun her, this creates ambiguity, He loves GMAT vs He loves her, He loves GMAT vs she loves GMAT. The correct formal form would be He love GMAT more than She.

The world is dominated by more polished people than him- The world is dominated by polished people vs the world is dominated by him---This is the ambiguity

POE
(A) who was thrust into a world that was dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than him- As discussed in error analysis
(B) who had been thrust into a world that was dominated by more wealthy, educated, and polished people than him - Same error as A
(C) who had been thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and people more polished than he was - Parallelism error People more polish is not parallel to wealthier, better educated.
(D) thrust into a world dominated by more wealthy, educated, and polished people than him -Same error as A
(E) thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than he- Correct answer choice

I don't think this concept is tested on GMAT but still good to know.
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2016, 00:37
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There is something weird about Choice E.

Quote:
(E) thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than he


First, if than is being used a conjunction, then there should be a clause after He; We might say the verb is elided after the subject he—but the vital question is—what is the elided verb .When you elide, the actual word should be present verbatim earlier. It cannot be ‘dominated’ because ‘dominated’ is not a verb here; it is a past participle.
For that matter, we cannot use an action verb here, after ‘he’ as there is no action verb in the prior part of the clause but for only a linking verb ‘was”
That is the reason we have to surmise that ‘than’ is used as preposition here, in which case, we cannot use ‘he”
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes resentfully  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2017, 12:05
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Mehed iHasan wrote:
The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes resentfully, that he was a small-town Midwesterner who was thrust into a world that was
dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than him
.
(A) who was thrust into a world that was dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than him
(B) who had been thrust into a world that was dominated by more wealthy, educated, and polished people than him
(C) who had been thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and people more polished than he was
(D) thrust into a world dominated by more wealthy, educated, and polished people than him
(E) thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than he


Please explain your answer.....


1. We have a comparison. So it has to be "he", not "him". A, B, D are out.
2. How can we use past perfect here? There are no actions before. C, B are out.
It leaves us with E,the correct option.
Moreover.
3. Why "he was" in C? He is now. In general. C is out.
4. "Wealthy" has 2 syllables and ends with "y" so it will be "wealthier", not "more wealthy". D is out.
5. "who was thrust" seems redundant.
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2018, 12:16
hellom3p wrote:
The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes resentfully, that he was a small-town Midwesterner who was thrust into a world that was dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than him.

(A) who was thrust into a world that was dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than him a
(B) who had been thrust into a world that was dominated by more wealthy, educated, and polished people than him
(C) who had been thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and people more polished than he was
(D) thrust into a world dominated by more wealthy, educated, and polished people than him
(E) thrust into a world dominated by wealthier, better-educated, and more polished people than he


1. There is no action in the past before another action in the past, so past perfect does not fit ---> B, C are out.
2. Too many "was" ---> we can go without it ---> So A is out.
3. "Wealthy" is disyllabic word, that ends in "y" ---> the rule for comparative form is "wealthier".
"More" is not used in this case. D is out.

E
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Re: The man was always aware, sometimes proudly and sometimes &nbs [#permalink] 20 Oct 2018, 12:16
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