GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 13 Oct 2019, 19:08

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement tha

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Senior PS Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: It always seems impossible until it's done.
Joined: 16 Sep 2016
Posts: 737
GMAT 1: 740 Q50 V40
GMAT 2: 770 Q51 V42
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement tha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 16 Sep 2019, 06:12
2
5
Question 1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 115 sessions

66% (03:25) correct 34% (03:31) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 151 sessions

71% (01:01) correct 29% (01:17) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 160 sessions

64% (01:03) correct 36% (01:12) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 4
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 168 sessions

22% (01:18) correct 78% (01:17) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 5
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 153 sessions

51% (01:14) correct 49% (01:23) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 6
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 143 sessions

64% (00:37) correct 36% (00:42) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 7
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 135 sessions

46% (01:36) correct 54% (01:38) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 8
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 131 sessions

51% (01:03) correct 49% (00:51) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

New Project RC Butler 2019 - Practice 2 RC Passages Everyday
Passage # 184, Date : 03-Jul-2019
This post is a part of New Project RC Butler 2019. Click here for Details


The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement that incorporated commonplace objects and commercial-art techniques into paintings— by paraphrasing the style of comic books in his work. His merger of a popular genre with the forms and intentions of fine art generated a complex result: while poking fun at the pretensions of the art world, Lichtenstein’s work also managed to convey a seriousness of theme that enabled it to transcend mere parody.

That Lichtenstein’s images were fine art was at first difficult to see, because, with their word balloons and highly stylized figures, they looked like nothing more than the comic book panels from which they were copied. Standard art history holds that pop art emerged as an impersonal alternative to the histrionics of abstract expressionism, a movement in which painters conveyed their private attitudes and emotions using nonrepresentational techniques. The truth is that by the time pop art first appeared in the early 1960s, abstract expressionism had already lost much of its force. Pop art painters weren’t quarreling with the powerful early abstract expressionist work of the late 1940s but with a second generation of abstract expressionists whose work seemed airy, high-minded, and overly lyrical. Pop art paintings were full of simple black lines and large areas of primary color. Lichtenstein’s work was part of a general rebellion against the fading emotional power of abstract expressionism, rather than an aloof attempt to ignore it.

But if rebellion against previous art by means of the careful imitation of a popular genre were all that characterized Lichtenstein’s work, it would possess only the reflective power that parodies have in relation to their subjects. Beneath its cartoonish methods, his work displayed an impulse toward realism, an urge to say that what was missing from contemporary painting was the depiction of contemporary life. The stilted romances and war stories portrayed in the comic books on which he based his canvases, the stylized automobiles, hot dogs, and table lamps that appeared in his pictures, were reflections of the culture Lichtenstein inhabited. But, in contrast to some pop art, Lichtenstein’s work exuded not a jaded cynicism about consumer culture, but a kind of deliberate naivete, intended as a response to the excess of sophistication he observed not only in the later abstract expressionists but in some other pop artists.With the comics— typically the domain of youth and innocence—as his reference point, a nostalgia fills his paintings that gives them, for all their surface bravado, an inner sweetness. His persistent use of comic-art conventions demonstrates a faith in reconciliation, not only between cartoons and fine art, but between parody and true feeling.
1. Which one of the following most accurately states the main point of the passage?

(A) Lichtenstein’s use of comic book elements in his paintings, considered simply a parodic reaction to the high-mindedness of later abstract expressionism, is also an attempt to re-create the emotionally powerful work of earlier abstract expressionists.
(B) Lichtenstein’s use of comic book elements is not solely a parodic reaction to the highmindedness of later abstract expressionism but also demonstrates an attempt to achieve realistic and nostalgic effects simultaneously in his paintings.
(C) Lichtenstein’s use of comic book elements obscures the emotional complexity contained in his paintings, a situation that has prevented his work from being recognized as fine art in the expressionist tradition.
(D) Lichtenstein’s use of comic book elements appears to mark his paintings as parodic reactions to the whole of abstract expressionism when they are instead a rebellion against the high-mindedness of the later abstract expressionists.
(E) Lichtenstein’s use of comic book elements in his paintings, though a response to the excessive sophistication of the art world, is itself highly sophisticated in that it manages to reconcile pop art and fine art.


2. Which one of the following best captures the author’s attitude toward Lichtenstein’s work?

(A) enthusiasm for its more rebellious aspects
(B) respect for its successful parody of youth and innocence
(C) pleasure in its blatant rejection of abstract expressionism
(D) admiration for its subtle critique of contemporary culture
(E) appreciation for its ability to incorporate both realism and naivete


3. The author most likely lists some of the themes and objects influencing and appearing in Lichtenstein’s paintings (lines 38–43) primarily to

(A) show that the paintings depict aspects of contemporary life
(B) support the claim that Lichtenstein’s work was parodic in intent
(C) contrast Lichtenstein’s approach to art with that of abstract expressionism
(D) suggest the emotions that lie at the heart of Lichtenstein’s work
(E) endorse Lichtenstein’s attitude toward consumer culture


4. Based on the passage, which one of the following would be an example of pop art that is most in keeping with the spirit of Lichtenstein’s work?

(A) a painting that uses realistic techniques to represent several simple objects arranged on a table
(B) a painting that parodies human figures by depicting them as stick figures
(C) a painting that conveys its creator’s inner turmoil through the use of bold lines and primary colors
(D) a painting that employs vague shapes and images to make a statement about consumer culture
(E) a painting that depicts products as they appear in magazine advertisements to comment on society’s values


5. Which one of the following, if true, would most challenge the author’s characterization of Lichtenstein?

(A) Lichtenstein frequently attended exhibitions by abstract expressionist painters in the 1960s.
(B) Lichtenstein praised a contemporary abstract expressionist in the 1960s for producing an atypically emotional painting.
(C) Lichtenstein praised an early abstract expressionist for producing emotional paintings.
(D) Lichtenstein criticized a pop artist in the 1960s for producing emotional paintings.
(E) Lichtenstein criticized a pop artist in the 1960s for producing paintings void of emotion.


6. The primary purpose of the passage is most likely to

(A) express curiosity about an artist’s work
(B) clarify the motivation behind an artist’s work
(C) contrast two opposing theories about an artist’s work
(D) describe the evolution of an artist’s work
(E) refute a previous overestimation of an artist’s work


7. Based on the passage, which one of the following does the author appear to believe about the rebellious aspect of Lichtenstein’s work?

(A) It was directed less against abstract expressionism exclusively than against overly sophisticated art.
(B) It was directed less against later abstract expressionism than against commercial art.
(C) It was directed less against later abstract expressionism exclusively than against abstract expressionism in general.
(D) It was an objection to the consumerism of the culture.
(E) It was an objection to the simplicity of line and color used by pop artists.


8. Based on the passage, which one of the following can most reasonably be inferred about abstract expressionism?

(A) Over time, it moved from abstraction to realism.
(B) Over time, it moved from intensity to lyricism.
(C) Over time, it moved from intellectualism to emotionalism.
(D) Over time, it moved from obscurity to clarity.
(E) Over time, it moved from density to sparseness.



  • Source: LSAT Official PrepTest 42 (December 2003)
  • Difficulty Level: 700

_________________
Regards,
Gladi



“Do. Or do not. There is no try.” - Yoda (The Empire Strikes Back)

Originally posted by Gladiator59 on 23 Jan 2019, 12:23.
Last edited by SajjadAhmad on 16 Sep 2019, 06:12, edited 3 times in total.
Updated - Complete topic (549).
Senior RC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 4055
GPA: 3.39
Re: The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement tha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jul 2019, 07:32
4
Hello akanshaxo and ssaamm Here is the explanation

Explanation


Road map

Para 1: Roy L.—comics + seriousness

Para 2: Pop art rebels against abstract impressionism

Para 3: Roy L. sincere, not cynical


2. Which one of the following best captures the author’s attitude toward Lichtenstein’s work?

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

Keep the Scope in mind during every question. Scope is a key factor in this Attitude question because all five choices are basically supportive of Lichtenstein. But on what grounds? (E) gets it right by echoing the successful merger of fun and seriousness with which the passage both begins and ends.

(A) Paragraph 3 begins by implying that if Lichtenstein were only about rebelliousness, as (A) would have it, he would be a fairly marginal figure.

(B) Likewise, the author’s interest in Lichtenstein transcends mere parody.

(C) Any “blatant rejection” or rebellion was against late abstract expressionism only, not the entire movement; and again, the author is interested in much more than sheer rebellion.

(D) Lichtenstein’s art was “cartoonish” and filled with “surface bravado,” terms that hardly convey the idea of a “subtle critique.”

Answer: E


4. Based on the passage, which one of the following would be an example of pop art that is most in keeping with the spirit of Lichtenstein’s work?

Difficulty Level: 750

Explanation

“The spirit of Lichtenstein’s work” is a pretty broad area of interest so it’s tough, if not impossible, to predict where the right answer will be going. After reviewing the gist of each paragraph, we should attack each choice in turn.

(A) Careful! While Lichtenstein had “an impulse toward realism,” we’re explicitly told that his art contained “word balloons and highly stylized figures” (lines 9-10).

(B) Lichtenstein was parodying the high-mindedness of a genre, late abstract expressionism, not human beings per se. And “stick figures” (not withstanding the “simple black lines”) don’t seem to go along with the comic book genre and the “large areas of primary color.”

(D) The “simple black lines,” however, certainly don’t suggest (D)’s “vague shapes and images.” Lichtenstein dealt with consumer culture (paragraph 3) using recognizable images, not vague ones.

(E) The only one left has to be the winner, and it is. The “comment on society’s values” echoes the “reflections of the culture” reference in line 35

Answer: E


5. Which one of the following, if true, would most challenge the author’s characterization of Lichtenstein?

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

Weakening a Reading Comprehension argument is trickier than doing so in Logical Reasoning, because the latter consists of only one conclusion and support, while a reading passage can contain several arguments. Be sure to tie your choice specifically to something in the text.

(A) That Lichtenstein may have gone to abstract expressionism exhibitions neither marks him as a hypocrite nor is inconsistent with the author’s assertions. Surely Lichtenstein needed to see the genre in order to rebel against it.

(B),(C) Praise for an abstract expressionist of any period, early or late, who manages to get some emotion into his art is very much in character for Lichtenstein; remember, he was rebelling against “fading emotional power” (lines 23–26).

(D) The very reason that (B) and (C) are in character for Lichtenstein, makes (D) the right answer. For Lichtenstein to criticize emotionality in a painting— especially in a fellow pop artist—would contradict his quarrel with “airy, high-minded,…lyrical” abstract art.

(E) The other side of (B)’s and (C)’s coin. It’s quite in keeping for Lichtenstein, a man who merged “parody and true feeling,” to bash an artist for pushing emotion out.

Answer: D


8. Based on the passage, which one of the following can most reasonably be inferred about abstract expressionism?

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

When all five choices look remarkably similar, don’t let that distract you. Seek out their explicit differences.

Abstract expressionism is—again—paragraph 2 only, and while the early stage is described as “powerful” (line 18) the later stage is “airy, high-minded, and overly lyrical” ([b]line 21). That’s (B),[/b] pretty straightforwardly.

(A) Lichtenstein employed realism; the abstract expressionists (as the name implies) evidently never did.

(C) Has it exactly backward. 180.

(D) Abstract expressionism is described as always having been “nonrepresentational,” so on the evidence it never reached a point of “clarity.”

(E) However “dense” early abstract expressionism may have been, “airy” and “lyrical,” the adjectives that the author ascribes to the late stage of the movement, hardly sound like “sparseness.”

Answer: B


Hope It helps
_________________
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2019
Posts: 1
Re: The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement tha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Jul 2019, 03:28
Please explain the 7th question's solution
Senior RC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 4055
GPA: 3.39
Re: The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement tha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Jul 2019, 08:06
2
Explanation


7. Based on the passage, which one of the following does the author appear to believe about the rebellious aspect of Lichtenstein’s work?

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

This is an inference question, “Rebellious” is paragraph 2, so search there. Lines 22–24 tie in with lines 17–21 to lead to (A): Lichtenstein and his fellow pop artists appreciated “the powerful early” abstract expressionists, but disdained the intellectual and airy later offshoots.

(B) The bashing of “commercial art” comes out of nowhere. Moreover, (B) reduces late abstract expressionism as a Lichtenstein target, when in fact that was precisely what Lichtenstein was rebelling against.

(C) 180; gets it exactly backward.

(D) Lichtenstein’s treatment of consumerism—which was more nuanced than a mere “objection”—is in any case not part of the rebellion paragraph, paragraph 2.

(E) A huge distortion. Why would Lichtenstein object to techniques that he himself used ?(lines 20–21)

Answer: A


Hope it helps

AmruthaMV wrote:
Please explain the 7th question's solution

_________________
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 11 Jun 2018
Posts: 49
Re: The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement tha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Jul 2019, 08:54
why not c is correct in question 4
Senior RC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 4055
GPA: 3.39
Re: The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement tha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Jul 2019, 09:08
First read line 35 in the passage.

The “comment on society’s values” echoes the “reflections of the culture”.

Now compare the both E and C.

(C) a painting that conveys its creator’s inner turmoil through the use of bold lines and primary colors

(E) a painting that depicts products as they appear in magazine advertisements to comment on society’s values

So C is wrong.

Hope it heps

Kanvi wrote:
why not c is correct in question 4

_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2856
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement tha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Jul 2019, 20:08
1
AmruthaMV wrote:
Please explain the 7th question's solution

We are told that "Lichtenstein’s work was part of a general rebellion against the fading emotional power of abstract expressionism." Backing up a couple sentences, we have, "Pop art painters weren’t quarreling with the powerful early abstract expressionist work of the late 1940s but with a second generation of abstract expressionists whose work seemed airy, high-minded, and overly lyrical."

As a pop art painter, Lichtenstein did NOT quarrel (have a disagreement) with early abstract expressionism. So we can infer that Lichtenstein did not necessarily have a problem with abstract expressionism in general. In fact, Lichtenstein viewed early abstract expressionism as "powerful". On the other hand, Lichtenstein, DID quarrel with a second generation of abstract expressionists.

Now we come to the most important bit: "But, in contrast to some pop art, Lichtenstein’s work exuded not a jaded cynicism about consumer culture, but a kind of deliberate naivete, intended as a response to the excess of sophistication he observed not only in the later abstract expressionists but in some other pop artists."

Lichtenstein's work did NOT display jaded cynicism about consumer culture. His work did, however, did display a deliberate naivete (lack of sophistication) in response to the excessive sophistication of later (i.e. second generation) abstract expressionists AND of some other pop artists.

So Lichtenstein did not rebel against ALL abstract expressionism, and his rebellion was not limited to abstract expressionism. Instead, Lichtenstein rebelled against excessive sophistication, regardless of the type of art (i.e. abstract expressionism or pop art).

Hopefully that helps with #7! If not, please let us know what you are thinking -- the more specific your questions, the better we can help.
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
Senior PS Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: It always seems impossible until it's done.
Joined: 16 Sep 2016
Posts: 737
GMAT 1: 740 Q50 V40
GMAT 2: 770 Q51 V42
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement tha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Jul 2019, 01:30
ssaamm, there are already quite a few explanations on this passage. Kindly go through them once and feel free to tag any of the experts if you have any specific questions. You can also find a good discussion on this passage here.

Meanwhile, I will try to get my hands on the OE and share if I find it.
_________________
Regards,
Gladi



“Do. Or do not. There is no try.” - Yoda (The Empire Strikes Back)
GMAT Club Bot
Re: The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement tha   [#permalink] 07 Jul 2019, 01:30
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The painter Roy Lichtenstein helped to define pop art—the movement tha

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne