GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 27 Jun 2019, 01:45

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

The publisher of a best-selling self-help book

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
Senior PS Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: It always seems impossible until it's done.
Joined: 16 Sep 2016
Posts: 749
GMAT 1: 740 Q50 V40
GMAT 2: 770 Q51 V42
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
The publisher of a best-selling self-help book  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Dec 2018, 12:55
7
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

36% (02:25) correct 64% (02:32) wrong based on 233 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics


The publisher of a best-selling self-help book had, in some promotional material, claimed that it showed readers how to become exceptionally successful. Of course, everyone knows that no book can deliver to the many what, by definition, must remain limited to the few exceptional successes. Thus, although it is clear that the publisher knowingly made a false claim, doing so should not be considered unethical in this case.

Which one of the following principles, if valid, most strongly supports the reasoning above?

(A) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if it is reasonable for people to accept the claim as true.
(B) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical if those making it derive a gain at the expense of those acting as if the claim were true.
(C) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical in only those cases in which those who accept the claim as true suffer a hardship greater than the gain they were anticipating.
(D) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if there is a possibility that someone will act as if the claim might be true.
(E) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical in at least those cases in which for someone else to discover that the claim is false, that person must have acted as if the claim were true.

_________________
Regards,
Gladi



“Do. Or do not. There is no try.” - Yoda (The Empire Strikes Back)
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 7765
Re: The publisher of a best-selling self-help book  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Dec 2018, 19:40
Gladiator59 wrote:
The publisher of a best-selling self-help book had, in some promotional material, claimed that it showed readers how to become exceptionally successful. Of course, everyone knows that no book can deliver to the many what, by definition, must remain limited to the few exceptional successes. Thus, although it is clear that the publisher knowingly made a false claim, doing so should not be considered unethical in this case.

Which one of the following principles, if valid, most strongly supports the reasoning above?

(A) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if it is reasonable for people to accept the claim as true.
(B) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical if those making it derive a gain at the expense of those acting as if the claim were true.
(C) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical in only those cases in which those who accept the claim as true suffer a hardship greater than the gain they were anticipating.
(D) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if there is a possibility that someone will act as if the claim might be true.
(E) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical in at least those cases in which for someone else to discover that the claim is false, that person must have acted as if the claim were true.



Our answer is dependent on the reasoning of the para. So, it is important to understand what the para tells us.
The para states that an author claims that his book can teach people to be exceptionally successful. But exceptionally successful by default means only few above others. So, if more people start coming to that level, then it is no more exceptionally successful but the benchmark would be raised further.
So it may not be correct for people to believe that every one can be exceptionally successful.
The reasoning is reworded in choice A
_________________
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 78
Location: India
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: The publisher of a best-selling self-help book  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Dec 2018, 01:28
Hi GMATNinja , experts

I didn't understand why B is not correct here . Can you please explain. Also I am not able to do this level of questions yet and I have my exam scheduled on10th Jan. What should I do.:(
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 11 Apr 2016
Posts: 19
GMAT 1: 680 Q49 V34
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V36
Re: The publisher of a best-selling self-help book  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Dec 2018, 01:00
1
Tough One. Here are my 2 cents

Lets state the premises
a) Author knowingly made a false claim because the definition of exceptional prohibits "success" to be a widespread phenomenon.
b) Of course, everyone knows that no book can deliver to the many what..blah blah: key point to note here is that everyone knows that it is a false claim

so the author knows it is a false claim, everyone else knows it is a false claim and the conclusion is author didn't do anything unethical hmm..

Lets review the options:


(A) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if it is reasonable for people to accept the claim as true.
Since people know the claim to be false, this option strengthens

(B) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical if those making it derive a gain at the expense of those acting as if the claim were true.
nowhere in the stimulus it has been mentioned that the author is deriving any benefits. Sure it is best selling, but the author could be donating the money in charity. Also, we don't if readers will act on it, we are not sure that our case is the one described by this option.

(C) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical in only those cases in which those who accept the claim as true suffer a hardship greater than the gain they were anticipating.
again we don't know whether this is describing the case in question.

(D) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if there is a possibility that someone will act as if the claim might be true.
"Act" is the key word here. we know that people know the claim made by the publisher to be false but whether any of them will act as if were true.

(E) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical in at least those cases in which for someone else to discover that the claim is false, that person must have acted as if the claim were true.
again we don't know the case in question resembles the one described here.

A) is direct and hence the answer.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2583
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: The publisher of a best-selling self-help book  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Apr 2019, 06:52
zac123 wrote:
Hi GMATNinja , experts

I didn't understand why B is not correct here . Can you please explain. Also I am not able to do this level of questions yet and I have my exam scheduled on10th Jan. What should I do.:(

zac123, sorry that we couldn't get you some more timely advice :(

For anyone looking for general verbal help, I can recommend the following threads as a starting point:


Quote:
(B) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical if those making it derive a gain at the expense of those acting as if the claim were true.

As for this specific question, the conclusion is, "although it is clear that the publisher knowingly made a false claim, doing so should not be considered unethical in this case." We are looking for something that MOST STRONGLY SUPPORTS the reasoning of the argument. Choice (B) suggests that the publisher's actions SHOULD be considered unethical. We want something that suggests that the publisher's actions should NOT be considered unethical.

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
D
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 9369
Location: Pune, India
Re: The publisher of a best-selling self-help book  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 May 2019, 00:11
Gladiator59 wrote:
The publisher of a best-selling self-help book had, in some promotional material, claimed that it showed readers how to become exceptionally successful. Of course, everyone knows that no book can deliver to the many what, by definition, must remain limited to the few exceptional successes. Thus, although it is clear that the publisher knowingly made a false claim, doing so should not be considered unethical in this case.

Which one of the following principles, if valid, most strongly supports the reasoning above?

(A) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if it is reasonable for people to accept the claim as true.
(B) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical if those making it derive a gain at the expense of those acting as if the claim were true.
(C) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical in only those cases in which those who accept the claim as true suffer a hardship greater than the gain they were anticipating.
(D) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if there is a possibility that someone will act as if the claim might be true.
(E) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical in at least those cases in which for someone else to discover that the claim is false, that person must have acted as if the claim were true.



Argument:
Publisher claims that the book shows how to be exceptionally successful.
Everyone knows a book can't show everyone how to be "exceptional" since if everyone is exceptional, no one will be.
It is clear that publisher knowingly made a false claim.

But it should not be considered unethical in this case.

Why? The point is why it should not be considered unethical in "this" case? What supports this?

The argument clearly states that a claim is made but everyone knows it cannot be true. So if we can say that "when everyone knows it is a false claim then it should not be considered unethical," it helps our conclusion.


(A) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if it is reasonable for people to accept the claim as true.

This helps. So it is unethical only if people will accept it to be true. But since everyone knows it is a false claim, it should not be considered unethical. This is correct.

(B) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical if those making it derive a gain at the expense of those acting as if the claim were true.

We don't know whether the publisher derives any gain.

(C) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical in only those cases in which those who accept the claim as true suffer a hardship greater than the gain they were anticipating.

We don't know if anyone accepted the claim as true and then suffered a hardship.

(D) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if there is a possibility that someone will act as if the claim might be true.

We don't know whether there is a possibility that someone will ACT as if the claim might be true.

(E) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical in at least those cases in which for someone else to discover that the claim is false, that person must have acted as if the claim were true.

The moment you read "at least those cases" you know this is not the answer. It talks about some cases in which it is unethical. What happens in rest of the cases, we don't know. We need to know about those cases in which it is NOT unethical.

Answer (A)
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Oct 2015
Posts: 163
Re: The publisher of a best-selling self-help book  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 May 2019, 00:42
Gladiator59 wrote:
The publisher of a best-selling self-help book had, in some promotional material, claimed that it showed readers how to become exceptionally successful. Of course, everyone knows that no book can deliver to the many what, by definition, must remain limited to the few exceptional successes. Thus, although it is clear that the publisher knowingly made a false claim, doing so should not be considered unethical in this case.

Which one of the following principles, if valid, most strongly supports the reasoning above?

(A) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if it is reasonable for people to accept the claim as true.
(B) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical if those making it derive a gain at the expense of those acting as if the claim were true.
(C) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical in only those cases in which those who accept the claim as true suffer a hardship greater than the gain they were anticipating.
(D) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if there is a possibility that someone will act as if the claim might be true.
(E) Knowingly making a false claim is unethical in at least those cases in which for someone else to discover that the claim is false, that person must have acted as if the claim were true.


Option A states that " Knowingly making a false claim is unethical only if it is reasonable for people to accept the claim as true. "
That means " Knowingly making a false claim is not unethical if it is NOT reasonable for people to accept the claim as true."
The passage says that publisher's claim is not unethical as everyone finds the claim NOT reasonable to accept.
So option A supports the reasoning mentioned in the passage.
Option A is the answer.
Please give me kudo s if you liked my explanation.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: The publisher of a best-selling self-help book   [#permalink] 08 May 2019, 00:42
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The publisher of a best-selling self-help book

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne