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Re: ­The Slavery Abolition Act of 1833 in Britain provides a case in point [#permalink]
IMO option B is the right answer

Because Public gatherings and pamphlets played a role, in creating awareness but were not the factors in making an impact. ⁤⁤The passage mentions that despite using strategies like meetings and pamphlets antislavery activists still faced challenges from the slavery lobby. ⁤⁤This indicates that while these methods had some influence they were not entirely effective on their own. ⁤
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Re: ­The Slavery Abolition Act of 1833 in Britain provides a case in point [#permalink]
 
Godhimself wrote:
­The Slavery Abolition Act of 1833 in Britain provides a case in point. There was certainly a generalised sense of political crisis in the country in the early 1830s. Urban radicals were pressuring the government to widen the electoral franchise, and impoverished agricultural workers had risen up in the Captain Swing Riots. On top of this, antislavery activists were continuing their decades-long struggle: more than 700,000 people remained enslaved on British-owned sugar plantations in the Caribbean. Yet their largely reformist strategy – such as holding public meetings and distributing pamphlets – was still not enough to tip the balance against the powerful slave-owning lobby.

The effectiveness of antislavery activists' strategies in the early 1830s relies on which of the following assumptions

(­A) Antislavery activists had significant influence over urban radicals.

(B) Public meetings and pamphlets were insufficient alone but important in building awareness.

(C) The British government was indifferent to public opinion.

(D) The electoral franchise could not be widened without addressing slavery.

(E) Agricultural workers were supportive of the antislavery movement.­

 

­

Godhimself, Some constructive feedback -

-> Option B seems to make sense, but "is it an assumption", is the question?
-> Also, the information or the premise setup is complicated and it is not providing concrete relation to the question and it's options. Too many open endings for an unclear question.

Thanks for sharing the question here on this forum!
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Re: ­The Slavery Abolition Act of 1833 in Britain provides a case in point [#permalink]
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