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The Spotted Mole is a rodent that burrows underground and

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Re: The Spotted Mole is a rodent that burrows underground and  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2016, 20:03
mikemcgarry wrote:
tryambaks wrote:
Hi Mike,

I have a question here.
Even though I marked the corrected answer and while answering used negation to eliminate option A , it took more than 2 minutes to answer the question :(
Applying the negation in the end between two close answer choices always eats up my time.
Mostly I am suffering from this problem, in which I get confused between two answers at the end and it takes some additional time there.

Could you please tell me how to improve such this problem ? :(

Dear tryambaks,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, you may notice in option (A) the extreme language, "every single Spotted Mole." This is a BIG tip-off. As a general rule, a statement that contains extreme language is exceedingly unlikely to be correct on the GMAT GC. The extreme words (all, none, never, always, every, etc.) should be a quick clue that something is amiss with that answer choice. That's at least one clue that will be helpful in a few CR arguments.

I think the larger issue, though, is getting used to critical thinking. Here's what I will say. Over and above any GMAT prep you are doing, I will recommend that you read high quality newspapers and high quality news magazines. In particular, read business news and political news. Look for arguments that people are making: most articles will contain an argument by one or more of the characters quoted in the article, and the writer may also be presenting a more subtle argument as well. Spend time thinking about these real world arguments, about what motivates all kinds of people in all kinds of positions. Ultimately, every advertisement is an argument: apply all the GMAT CR logic to every ad you see --- what are the assumptions? what would strengthen or weaken their argument? what additional information would you need to evaluate their claims? Even when a friend makes an argument to you, bring this level of analysis to it.

Make it your default habit to approach every argument you see in life this way. First of all, this will help you be more efficient on the GMAT CR. More importantly, this is precisely the mindset you need to have, once you have your MBA and are at work in the modern business world.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)



Hi Mike,

Thank you for helping me out here and thanks for the suggestions.

I think I am in serious problem here.I am a native English speaker with terrible Comprehension skills. :|

I was studying the CR and RC and their rules and applying them in the questions. But, the real problem with me that you correctly analyzed is my inability to comprehend English text in a speedy manner.

Could you please suggest me what are the English journals or newspapers that I should start studying ?
I appeared for GMAT earlier this week and got only 590 with Q47 and disastrous V25.I literally lost the capability to comprehend the passages half past the exam.When I started a sentence I even forgot the first part when I reached the end :( :( .

Please help

Thanks
Tryambak
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The Spotted Mole is a rodent that burrows underground and  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2016, 06:38
tryambaks wrote:
mikemcgarry wrote:
tryambaks wrote:
Hi Mike,

I have a question here.
Even though I marked the corrected answer and while answering used negation to eliminate option A , it took more than 2 minutes to answer the question :(
Applying the negation in the end between two close answer choices always eats up my time.
Mostly I am suffering from this problem, in which I get confused between two answers at the end and it takes some additional time there.

Could you please tell me how to improve such this problem ? :(

Dear tryambaks,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, you may notice in option (A) the extreme language, "every single Spotted Mole." This is a BIG tip-off. As a general rule, a statement that contains extreme language is exceedingly unlikely to be correct on the GMAT GC. The extreme words (all, none, never, always, every, etc.) should be a quick clue that something is amiss with that answer choice. That's at least one clue that will be helpful in a few CR arguments.

I think the larger issue, though, is getting used to critical thinking. Here's what I will say. Over and above any GMAT prep you are doing, I will recommend that you read high quality newspapers and high quality news magazines. In particular, read business news and political news. Look for arguments that people are making: most articles will contain an argument by one or more of the characters quoted in the article, and the writer may also be presenting a more subtle argument as well. Spend time thinking about these real world arguments, about what motivates all kinds of people in all kinds of positions. Ultimately, every advertisement is an argument: apply all the GMAT CR logic to every ad you see --- what are the assumptions? what would strengthen or weaken their argument? what additional information would you need to evaluate their claims? Even when a friend makes an argument to you, bring this level of analysis to it.

Make it your default habit to approach every argument you see in life this way. First of all, this will help you be more efficient on the GMAT CR. More importantly, this is precisely the mindset you need to have, once you have your MBA and are at work in the modern business world.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)



Hi Mike,

Thank you for helping me out here and thanks for the suggestions.

I think I am in serious problem here.I am a native English speaker with terrible Comprehension skills. :|

I was studying the CR and RC and their rules and applying them in the questions. But, the real problem with me that you correctly analyzed is my inability to comprehend English text in a speedy manner.

Could you please suggest me what are the English journals or newspapers that I should start studying ?
I appeared for GMAT earlier this week and got only 590 with Q47 and disastrous V25.I literally lost the capability to comprehend the passages half past the exam.When I started a sentence I even forgot the first part when I reached the end :( :( .

Please help

Thanks
Tryambak


For RC I recommend you start reading The Economist, the WSJ, and Scientific American. Obviously you can't quiz yourself but it could help just improve your reading skills.

For CR I recommend you keep studying the questions. The most important thing to most CR questions is finding the conclusion. Can you find the conclusion in most of these questions?
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Re: The Spotted Mole is a rodent that burrows underground and  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2016, 16:31
tryambaks wrote:
Hi Mike,

Thank you for helping me out here and thanks for the suggestions.

I think I am in serious problem here.I am a native English speaker with terrible Comprehension skills. :|

I was studying the CR and RC and their rules and applying them in the questions. But, the real problem with me that you correctly analyzed is my inability to comprehend English text in a speedy manner.

Could you please suggest me what are the English journals or newspapers that I should start studying ?
I appeared for GMAT earlier this week and got only 590 with Q47 and disastrous V25.I literally lost the capability to comprehend the passages half past the exam.When I started a sentence I even forgot the first part when I reached the end :( :( .

Please help

Thanks
Tryambak

Dear Tryambak,
My friend, I am happy to respond. :-)

I don't know whether you have to take the TOEFL or have already taken it, but Magoosh has a TOEFL course that could help you with many of the basics of English. Even if you don't have to take the test, you may still find some articles on the free TOEFL blog helpful:
http://magoosh.com/toefl/

I like what gmatser1 recommended. The very best thing you could do to build your Verbal comprehension is to cultivate the habit of reading. This means you should read for at least an hour a day every single day without fail. That's an hour over and above any GMAT-specific practice you do. I will say that gmatser1 already recommended some very good sources. You will find more here:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/how-to-imp ... bal-score/
https://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-reading-list/

Finally, I will say that the Magoosh GMAT product has an extensive Verbal section with a number of lessons, including a long series on grammar. Here's a sample:
https://gmat.magoosh.com/lessons/914-th ... rb-mistake
Furthermore, every single Magoosh practice question has its own video explanation. This sort of immediate feedback, after each and every question, is exactly what you need to accelerate your understanding of English. Here's a sample SC question:
https://gmat.magoosh.com/questions/3563
Here's a sample CR question:
https://gmat.magoosh.com/questions/5405
When you submit your answer to each question, the following page will have the VE. Finally, notice that you are eligible for Magoosh's score guarantee. You already have an official GMAT, so if you follow all the requirements, we guarantee at least a 50 point increase. Of course, many of our students see much bigger increases than that.

Please let me know if you have any further questions.

Mike :-)
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The Spotted Mole is a rodent that burrows underground and  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2017, 11:54
mikemcgarry wrote:
jlgdr wrote:
A sounded too extreme, but still wouldn't it have to be true? Could someone clarify this please?

Disclosure: I picked

Cheers!
J :)

Dear jlgdr,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, remember, the opposite of "all" is not "none." The opposite of "all" is simply "not all" --- of course, "all" means 100%, but "not all" could be 1%, 10%, 50%, 80% or 99.9%.

So, suppose (A) is false. Suppose it's not true that the "birds of prey capture and kill every single Spotted Mole that comes above ground." Suppose of an original population of 1000 Spotted Moles on a particular, the birds of prey kill all but 7, and some 7 particularly lucky or particularly fast or crafty Spotted Moles survive. Well, in that case, the birds of prey did not kill "every single" one, but if there are only 7 left, they are not going to pose much of a threat to the farm. The spotted hawks could kill over 99%, the vast majority of the moles, and even though they didn't kill every last one, it's enough to protect the farms.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi mikemcgarry
I think this question needs to be reworded as the conclusion which is derived from the facts is that the Spotted mole poses no threat.
No is too extreme here and according to choice A) even if a small fraction of moles survive (e: 7/1000) we cannot conclude that these moles pose no threat.If it was negligible threat,A) could be eliminated but no threat is too extreme and thus A cannot be eliminated.
Is there any mistake in my reasoning here ?

Thanks,
Saksham.
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Re: The Spotted Mole is a rodent that burrows underground and  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2017, 12:34
I think option A is taken from the premise itself.. where in premise it says 'it it comes above at all birls WILL kill them, same is paraphrased in option A.. since assumption cant be taken from premise... option A is wrong
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New post 05 Dec 2017, 17:38
Sakshamachiever wrote:
Hi mikemcgarry
I think this question needs to be reworded as the conclusion which is derived from the facts is that the Spotted mole poses no threat.
No is too extreme here and according to choice A) even if a small fraction of moles survive (e: 7/1000) we cannot conclude that these moles pose no threat.If it was negligible threat,A) could be eliminated but no threat is too extreme and thus A cannot be eliminated.
Is there any mistake in my reasoning here ?

Thanks,
Saksham.

Dear Sakshamachiever,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, my friend, you are asking a question, a perfectly legitimate question, but notice how you started: "I think this question needs to be reworded." Think about this. One of the things I do as a professional is to write practice GMAT questions. By saying that my question needs to be rewritten, essentially you are saying that I don't know my job. In a way, this is a kind of insult. You say that, and then ask for my help--a bit of a mismatch, if you see what I mean.

Here's what I will say about this question. In GMAT CR, you can't think with absolute mathematical logic--you have to think about real world logic.

Imagine a pretend-world in which I mounted a major lawsuit against, say, McDonald's. Suppose I presented tons of scientific data and shocked the entire world with how bad McDonald's food was--that potentially could be a major threat to McDonald's business: in the most extreme scenario, it might cost the company hundreds of millions of dollars. That would be a real threat, and I am sure the company would recognize it as such.

Now, instead of all that, suppose I just go around a tell a few a my friends my poor opinion of McDonald's, and few who were using McDonald's then stop using it. Is that really a threat to McDonald's? Given the ordinary daily fluctuation of customers that such a restaurant experiences on the global scale, chances are very good that no one at any level of the company would be able to use any data to recognize that these few people stopped going to McDonald's. Yes, theoretically, in some mathematical sense, McDonald's is making slightly less money than it would have made if these few people continued to go there, but if the loss is so small that the company is absolutely unable to detect it, it's hard to call that a threat in any meaningful way.

Much in the same way, these commercial fruit plants do not exist hermetically sealed from reality---they are real plants in the real world. Some plants get diseases. Some get infested by insects. Some get too much sun or too much shade, too much or too little water. There's going to be natural variation in any real group of plants, a certain variation in the yield from year to year.

In that context, if say, seven moles do their worst, that damage may not be enough to be detectable above other variations.

You see, for the mathematician, there's an infinite difference between few and none: for example, there's a whole infinity of real numbers between x = 7/1000 and x = 0. For the business person, something that is negligible is functionally equivalent to something that is technically zero--when the business person says "X is negligible," essentially he is saying is that he treat X as if X = 0.

To understand GMAT CR properly, you have to think the way business people think. The whole point of the CR questions is to test your readiness for thinking in the rough & tumble of the business world. See:
GMAT Critical Reasoning and Outside Knowledge

Does all this make sense, my friend?
Mike :-)
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Re: The Spotted Mole is a rodent that burrows underground and  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2018, 10:37
Great Question mikemcgarry !!!

Conclusion : Therefore, the Spotted Mole poses no threat to these totally above-ground fruits.

Prethink :- Author assumes that Moles do not have any option to escape the surveillance of prey Birds.

Negating D will shatter the conclusion.
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The Spotted Mole is a rodent that burrows underground and  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2018, 07:21
The answer D, makes too many assumptions, clearly a poor question.

(D) The times of day the Spotted Mole feeds are the same as the times of day that the birds of prey are in the air.

1) What about the times of night when it feeds? Does the answer imply that the Spotted Mole only feeds during the day? It might come out to feed at nighttime when the birds of prey are not in air.

2) Does the fact that birds of prey are in the air necessarily imply that they will spot and kill the spotted mole before it can feed. Not at all. What if the birds operate at say 60% efficiency?

This means that even if the author assumes D, it just not justify the conclusion drawn. Assumption has to be something else, unless the author is prone to bad assumptions.

Also, if we negate the argument to say that mole doesnt feed when bird of prey is in air, there still exists the possibility that the a bird of prey perched on a tree might spot it and prey on it. so even negating it doesnt necessarily invalidate the argument.

I think Magoosh should take this question down rather than unnecessarily defending it.
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The Spotted Mole is a rodent that burrows underground and  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2018, 16:51
I was between A and D, but I've choosen A because for me was a stronger argument. My toughts were:

D is ok, but is kinda open, the birds of prey that are up in the same time that the moles can eat 1 out of every 100 spotted moles or 99 out of every 100. So the moles can still be a threat. And in this case I would be creating an information that is not given by the text. So, does not seems conclusive to me.

A would be more conclusive as you know, for sure, that no mole can eat the crops. If you negate this I think you fall in the same reasoning of the D, you don't kill them all. So it's possible that they kill 1 out of 100 or 99 out of 100, still open. They can kill just 1 out of 100, so 99% of mole population still there and the amount that they kill is irrelevant.

I still can't see clearly why D is a better option, I'm not saying that there is something wrong with the question. I honestly just want to know if there's something wrong with the way that I'm approaching the question.
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Re: The Spotted Mole is a rodent that burrows underground and  [#permalink]

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New post 09 May 2018, 02:40
mikemcgarry wrote:
The Spotted Mole is a rodent that burrows underground and eats all forms of vegetable matter. Farmers are concerned that this mole could eat some of their commercial fruits, planted in above-ground planters and bins. The farmers need not worry about the Mole, though, because throughout the region in which the Spotted Mole is found, birds of prey such as hawks and falcons are active, and these birds would prey upon the Spotted Mole if the mole came above ground at all. Therefore, the Spotted Mole poses no threat to these totally above-ground fruits.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

(A) The birds of prey capture and kill every single Spotted Mole that comes above ground.
(B) Some land-based mammals active in this region, such as fox, will also hunt and eat the Spotted Mole on a regular basis.
(C) No other animal could pose as significant a threat to the above-ground fruits as could the Spotted Mole.
(D) The times of day the Spotted Mole feeds are the same as the times of day that the birds of prey are in the air.
(E) Larger burrowing mammals, such as badgers or weasels, can dig up the burrows of the Spotted Mole, endangering those that remain underground.


For a discussion of Assumptions and the Negation Test, and the explanation for this question, see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/assumption ... -the-gmat/

Mike :-)


Hi Sir,
How can I eliminate option a? it was very tough to choose b/w A and D, though D looked bit more convincing, but I was not able to find reason to eliminate A.
Re: The Spotted Mole is a rodent that burrows underground and &nbs [#permalink] 09 May 2018, 02:40

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