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The term “pit bull” does not designate a breed of dog, as do the terms

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The term “pit bull” does not designate a breed of dog, as do the terms  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2017, 08:46
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C
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73% (01:16) correct 27% (01:37) wrong based on 114 sessions

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The term “pit bull” does not designate a breed of dog, as do the terms “German shepherd” and “poodle.” It is like the terms “Seeing-Eye dog” and “police dog,” which designate dogs according to what they do. If you take two German shepherds and place them side by side, you cannot tell by appearance alone which is the police dog and which is the Seeing-Eye dog.

Which one of the following is the main point of the passage?


(A) German shepherds can be pit bulls.

(B) Pit bulls can be distinguished from other kinds of dogs by appearance alone.

(C) A dog is a pit bull because of what it does, not because of its breed.

(D) German shepherds can function both as police dogs and as Seeing-Eye dogs.

(E) Some breeds of dogs cannot be distinguished from other breeds of dogs by appearance alone.

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Re: The term “pit bull” does not designate a breed of dog, as do the terms  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2017, 09:14
Main point in passage is pitbull is not a breed but a name based on what it does.
So the answer should be C.

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Re: The term “pit bull” does not designate a breed of dog, as do the terms  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2019, 02:31
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Main Point. The correct answer choice is (C)

The term “pit bull” does not designate a breed, unlike the terms “German shepherd” and “poodle.” The term “pit bull” is more analogous to “Seeing-eye dog” and “police dog,” describing what the dogs do (rather than their breed). For example, given two German shepherds, you can't tell from appearance alone which one is the police dog and which is the seeing-eye dog.

This is a main point question. The stimulus seems geared toward convincing us that the term “pit bull” does not denote a breed of dog, but describes what the dog does. It even gives an example through analogy of two other terms that denote not the breed of dog, but the dog's job (police dog and seeing-eye dog). As such, we are looking for an answer that somehow encapsulates what the stimulus seems geared to convincing us of, described above.

Answer choice (A): This answer choice is incorrect because it does not do a good job of encapsulating the stimulus. Yes, German shepherds can be pit bulls, but the stimulus does not seem to be trying to convince us of that.

Answer choice (B): This answer choice is incorrect because, again, this is not what the stimulus is trying to convince us of.

Answer choice (C): This is the correct answer choice. It is very similar to what we pre-phrased earlier regarding what the stimulus is trying to convince us of.

Answer choice (D): This answer choice is incorrect because the bit about German shepherds, police dogs, and seeing-eye dogs was an example illustrating the distinction between the breed of dog, and the dog's job, which in turn, supports the conclusion that pit bulls denote the latter and not the former.

Answer choice (E): This answer choice is incorrect because it is broader than the stimulus' conclusion, which was focused on trying to prove a point about the term “pit bull.” One might argue that the stimulus broadened its focus beyond pit bulls by bringing into the discussion German shepherds, police dogs, and seeing-eye dogs. But remember that these terms were used to prove a point about pit bulls, not make a generalization about German shepherds, police dogs, and seeing-eye dogs. The focus of this stimulus has always been trying to make an assertion regarding pit bulls, nothing more.
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Re: The term “pit bull” does not designate a breed of dog, as do the terms   [#permalink] 06 Aug 2019, 02:31
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The term “pit bull” does not designate a breed of dog, as do the terms

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