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Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances

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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2018, 01:54
daagh wrote:
Isn’t this also essentially a test of tense. The phrase ‘in his time’ marks a timeline that has come to close long ago. How can we drag an event of those bygone days to the current days with a present perfect? You do require a plural past tense, i,e., ‘were’. That is why E is out.



present perfect can be used to show a past action which no longer exists but there must be no point of time in this case.
because we have "to his time", an indication of past point of time, we have to use past simple

simple past and present perfect can be used interchangebly when there is no specific time point in the past
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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2018, 01:58
nother error in choice e is that

for our own must parallel with to his time
for our own can not be parallel with in his time.

so , choice E contain two erros.
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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2018, 19:46
In the context of this question, are the use of both 'in his time' and 'to his time' correct?

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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2018, 20:09
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Usage of idioms is always subject to custom rather than to reason. If GMAC thinks that so and so idiom is good enough, then it is better to abide by it rather than doubt it.
In the given context, assuming that ' his times' is more reasonable than 'to his times', is there a correct choice without any other errors?
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Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 07 Nov 2018, 07:31
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Dear Thangvietnam,

Your observation that past tense and present perfect are interchangeable when there is no time reference is interesting. Could you kindly help with some examples, especially if there is one in the official questions?
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Originally posted by daagh on 02 Aug 2018, 20:16.
Last edited by daagh on 07 Nov 2018, 07:31, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2018, 12:12
Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances in modern surgery, the discipline of sport, the strains of individuals in tension with society or even with themselves—was as disturbing to his own time as it is compelling for ours.

(A) was as disturbing to his own time as it is
(B) were as disturbing to his own time as they are

(C) has been as disturbing in his own time as they are
(D) had been as disturbing in his own time as it was
(E) have been as disturbing in his own time as

usage of and makes the subject plural,
the disturbing was done in the past and finished but the disturbing of past is not still going on. so have been is wrong,
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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2018, 07:05
(A) was as disturbing to his own time as it is
(B) were as disturbing to his own time as they are
(C) has been as disturbing in his own time as they are
(D) had been as disturbing in his own time as it was
(E) have been as disturbing in his own time as
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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Nov 2018, 08:05
Can anyone tell me what is the antecedent of "his"?

Thanks
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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Nov 2018, 08:18
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Risho
'His' is a possessive pronoun for Thomas Eatkins'. Please note that Eatkins is the full name that ends in 's'. We simply put an apostrophe over the 's'. Some more examples are Economics', labors'(plural, includes several kinds of labors). The ending in 's' is the criterion.
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Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2019, 23:07
@GMATNinja@abhimahna@e-GMAT:
I have question regarding the use of as ... as comparison.
In general while approaching a comparison question ( I do not know if I have used the correct term - I mean the questions comparing ideas using not only .. but also, either .. or , nor etc.), my general approach is to check the meaning of ideas being compared and then check the sentence structure.

For instance, in this example, I checked "disturbing to his own time" & "it is compelling for ours". I observed that first phrase is an adjectival phrase and second is a clause with a subject (it --> to be corrected to they =style and choice) + verb (is). So there is a parallelism error.

Now in the OA, if I apply the same logic, it seems to suggest that there is something wrong with parallelism.
So can I rectify the above logic as: If there is a tense ambiguity then the parallelism must denote proper timeline, hence the structure must be:
1. X + "tense indicator" + as/not only/etc. + "comparing phrase" + as/not only/etc. + Y + "tense indicator" + "comparing phrase".
2. X + "tense indicator"+ as fast/likely/equal etc as+ Y + "tense indicator" + "comparing phrase"
And extending the previous logic, I need to ensure parallelism between the two "comparing phrases".

I would like to know if there is anything wrong in my basic understanding of parallelism and if I my logic is correct?
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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2019, 10:20
Why not option A. When we speak about the same subject connected by AND, verb always takes singular form
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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Apr 2019, 10:04
aniket16c wrote:
@GMATNinja@abhimahna@e-GMAT:
I have question regarding the use of as ... as comparison.
In general while approaching a comparison question ( I do not know if I have used the correct term - I mean the questions comparing ideas using not only .. but also, either .. or , nor etc.), my general approach is to check the meaning of ideas being compared and then check the sentence structure.

For instance, in this example, I checked "disturbing to his own time" & "it is compelling for ours". I observed that first phrase is an adjectival phrase and second is a clause with a subject (it --> to be corrected to they =style and choice) + verb (is). So there is a parallelism error.

Now in the OA, if I apply the same logic, it seems to suggest that there is something wrong with parallelism.
So can I rectify the above logic as: If there is a tense ambiguity then the parallelism must denote proper timeline, hence the structure must be:
1. X + "tense indicator" + as/not only/etc. + "comparing phrase" + as/not only/etc. + Y + "tense indicator" + "comparing phrase".
2. X + "tense indicator"+ as fast/likely/equal etc as+ Y + "tense indicator" + "comparing phrase"
And extending the previous logic, I need to ensure parallelism between the two "comparing phrases".

I would like to know if there is anything wrong in my basic understanding of parallelism and if I my logic is correct?

First, it's important to differentiate between parallel markers such as "both/and," or "either/or," and comparison markers, such as "as" or "like." When you see "both," for instance, the structure of the parallel components will usually be close to identical: "Lebron James, for all of his many impressive accomplishments, has disappointed fans both in Cleveland and in Los Angeles. In each case, we have "preposition + noun," so grammatically speaking, they're the same.

But when we use "as," which is a comparison marker, we have a little more flexibility, in terms of the placement of the items we're comparing. For example:

    "Tim ate as many hot dogs yesterday as Dave will tomorrow."

This sentence is perfectly fine - we're comparing how many hot dogs Tim ate yesterday and how many hot dogs Dave will eat tomorrow. We wouldn't read it and worry about the fact that the noun phrase "many hot dogs" follows the first "as" and the full clause "Dave did" follows the second. Moreover, there are structural clues indicating that the actions take place at different times, so it's appropriate that the verb tenses vary.

Put another way, rather than breaking the items into parts of speech and rigidly applying rules, we want to think about the logic of the construction.

In the OA, we're comparing two elements: 1) how compelling Eakins' style and choices were in his time to 2) how compelling they are in ours. The meaning makes sense, and there are no grammatical mistakes. That's what we care about most.

I hope that helps!
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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Apr 2019, 00:27
daagh wrote:
Isn’t this also essentially a test of tense. The phrase ‘in his time’ marks a timeline that has come to close long ago. How can we drag an event of those bygone days to the current days with a present perfect? You do require a plural past tense, i,e., ‘were’. That is why E is out.


I see that the explanation given to not use Present perfect tense is that since the TE guy died so it's in the past and we can't use Option E. But we're not talking about him. We're talking about his work. Which he created in the past and is still exists and compels us. So shouldn't Present perfect tense be preferred?
Please could you explain a little.
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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Apr 2019, 01:19
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Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances in modern surgery, the discipline of sport, the strains of individuals in tension with society or even with themselves—was as disturbing to his own time as it is compelling for ours.

(A) was as disturbing to his own time as it is
(B) were as disturbing to his own time as they are

(C) has been as disturbing in his own time as they are
(D) had been as disturbing in his own time as it was
(E) have been as disturbing in his own time as

'Have been' marks the start of something in the past and its continuation until now or with its impact for a little more time. But a present perfect does not imply a current existence or a future continuation. If something is so eternal, the usual custom is to put them in a simple present. In addition, when we use a present perfect, there will be always a perfect tense marker in such expressions such since his time to now or over the past so many years, etc, etc. In a similar vein, because the truth exists even today, we cannot say '" are disturbing in his own time as"
Logical predication is a great requirement of GMAT.
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Re: Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances   [#permalink] 21 Apr 2019, 01:19

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