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Traditional "talk" therapy, in which a patient with a psychological

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Traditional "talk" therapy, in which a patient with a psychological  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2017, 10:24
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Traditional "talk" therapy, in which a patient with a psychological disorder discusses it with a trained therapist, produces chemical changes in the brain. These changes seem to correspond to improvements in certain aspects of the patient's behavior. Thus, physicians will eventually be able to treat such patients as effectively through pharmacological intervention in the brain's neurochemistry as through the lengthy intermediary of traditional "talk" methods.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

(A) All neurochemical changes produce corresponding psychological changes.

(B) Improvements in a patient's behavior produced by "talk" therapy occur only through chemical changes in the brain's neurochemistry.

(C) "Talk" therapy has not been effective at bringing about psychological change.

(D) If chemical changes in the brain's neurochemistry correspond to improvements in patient behavior, then psychology and neuroscience will eventually be indistinguishable.

(E) Direct intervention in the brain's neurochemistry is likely to become a less expensive way of treating psychological disorders than is "talk" therapy.

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Re: Traditional "talk" therapy, in which a patient with a psychological  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2017, 10:33
Traditional "talk" therapy, in which a patient with a psychological disorder discusses it with a trained therapist, produces chemical changes in the brain. These changes seem to correspond to improvements in certain aspects of the patient's behavior. Thus, physicians will eventually be able to treat such patients as effectively through pharmacological intervention in the brain's neurochemistry as through the lengthy intermediary of traditional "talk" methods.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

(A) All neurochemical changes produce corresponding psychological changes. -We can't say about "all" changes from the above passage. Incorrect.

(B) Improvements in a patient's behavior produced by "talk" therapy occur only through chemical changes in the brain's neurochemistry. -CORRECT. It refutes the possibility that any changes in brain other than the chemical changes help in the betterment of the psycho.

(C) "Talk" therapy has not been effective at bringing about psychological change. -The is a weakner. Incorrect.

(D) If chemical changes in the brain's neurochemistry correspond to improvements in patient behavior, then psychology and neuroscience will eventually be indistinguishable. -Alright let them be one. This is just a stated fact and out of scope of the argument at hand. Incorrect.

(E) Direct intervention in the brain's neurochemistry is likely to become a less expensive way of treating psychological disorders than is "talk" therapy -Ok let the direct intervention be cheaper. It is out of scope. Incorrect.
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Re: Traditional "talk" therapy, in which a patient with a psychological  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2017, 10:56
Assumption questions becomes much easier to attack when one understands the underlying idea of drawing conclusion. When author draws conclusion based on certain observation, he/she is 100% sure conclusion is correct and only observed behavior is responsible.

Observation - talk therapy releases certain chemicals in brain and patient's behavior improves.
Conclusion - use medicine to produce same chemicals and cut short recovery period

(A) All neurochemical changes produce corresponding psychological changes.Not all. OOS

(B) Improvements in a patient's behavior produced by "talk" therapy occur only through chemical changes in the brain's neurochemistry.
Negating this choice weakens author's conclusion. Thus, is correct choice.

(C) "Talk" therapy has not been effective at bringing about psychological change.
OOS

(D) If chemical changes in the brain's neurochemistry correspond to improvements in patient behavior, then psychology and neuroscience will eventually be indistinguishable.
Author is not comparing psychology and neuroscience.

(E) Direct intervention in the brain's neurochemistry is likely to become a less expensive way of treating psychological disorders than is "talk" therapy.
Never compared cost of treatment.
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Re: Traditional "talk" therapy, in which a patient with a psychological   [#permalink] 27 Jul 2017, 10:56
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