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Our understanding was that she would continue to cover the costs of studies, which she verbally agreed to pay with the rest of the family.

A. which she verbally agreed to pay with the rest of the family.
B. which she agreed verbally with the rest of the family to pay.
C. of which she agreed verbally with the rest of the family to pay.
D. both of which she verbally agreed to pay with the rest of the family.
E. both of which she agreed to pay with the rest of the family verbally.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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New post 16 Sep 2014, 01:58
Official Solution:

Our understanding was that she would continue to cover the costs of studies, which she verbally agreed to pay with the rest of the family.

A. which she verbally agreed to pay with the rest of the family.
B. which she agreed verbally with the rest of the family to pay.
C. of which she agreed verbally with the rest of the family to pay.
D. both of which she verbally agreed to pay with the rest of the family.
E. both of which she agreed to pay with the rest of the family verbally.

This sentence requires the correct placement of the adverb verbally, indicating the way in which the agreement was made, and the correct use of phrases indicating with whom (the rest of the family) the agreement was made.
  1. The phrase with the rest of the family is misplaced, making it sound as if the subject of the sentence and the rest of the family were planning to pay the fees together.
  2. The adverb verbally comes immediately after the verb agreed, indicating their correlation, and the placement of the phrase with the rest of the family makes it clear that the agreement was between the two parties.
  3. The word of is unnecessary and confusing.
  4. The phrase with the rest of the family is misplaced, making it sound as if the subject of the sentence and the family were planning to pay the fees together; also the word both is unnecessary and confusing.
  5. Verbally is misplaced, making it sound as if the promised payments will be made by speaking.

Answer: B
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Hello,

I have a general doubt with regard to the placement of "which" not just in the sentence but otherwise as well.
From what I have come to understand is that words such as "which" and "that" modify the closest noun in the sentence.
If we take this sentence as an example it would refer it "children". Which will not make any sense.

I request you to give the basic guidance as to when "which" or "that" can modify nouns placed slightly away from them as well in the sentence as is the case in this sentence here.

Thank you in advance.

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Which can modify slightly far away noun. If noun is followed by prepositional phrase and modifying the noun and cannot be placed anywhere else.

For example following GMATPrep question

Although she had been known as an effective legislator first in the Texas Senate and later in
the United States House of Representatives, Barbara Jordan did not become a nationally
recognized figure until 1974, when she participated in the hearings on the impeachment of
President Richard Nixon, which were televised nationwide.

Which is correctly modifying hearings. "Which were".

In this Question which is modifying the costs. Other prepositional phrase is modifying the costs itself.

madhavmarda wrote:
Hello,

I have a general doubt with regard to the placement of "which" not just in the sentence but otherwise as well.
From what I have come to understand is that words such as "which" and "that" modify the closest noun in the sentence.
If we take this sentence as an example it would refer it "children". Which will not make any sense.

I request you to give the basic guidance as to when "which" or "that" can modify nouns placed slightly away from them as well in the sentence as is the case in this sentence here.

Thank you in advance.

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New post 14 Jan 2016, 11:56
I think this the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate. I thought "which" will modify the preceding noun children and I thought it is wrong. Can you please help me on what I missed here.

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New post 03 Jun 2016, 08:17
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation.
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New post 21 Jul 2016, 05:40
I think this is a high quality-question and I fully agree with the explanation.

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New post 23 Jul 2016, 05:24
diegocml wrote:
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation.


bb, I've NEVER read this post and have never replied to this question. I dunno how this happened. Hope my account hasn't been hacked.
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New post 24 Jul 2016, 10:15
You clicked on the feedback button for this question in the tests and that has generated an automatic post to provide feedback to moderators and users.

PS. Your account is not hacked in other words.


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New post 20 Nov 2016, 11:51
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation.
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New post 08 Jan 2017, 04:15
Can someone point me to an official GMAT question which tests the positioning of adverbs in a sentence?

Would I be able to find this rule mentioned in the Manhattan SC book?

Thanks

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New post 08 Jan 2017, 18:55
Vaidya wrote:
Can someone point me to an official GMAT question which tests the positioning of adverbs in a sentence?

Would I be able to find this rule mentioned in the Manhattan SC book?

Thanks


The first chapter of the Manhattan SC guide covers the topic under the heading "Meaning: Place Your Words". The discussion is about placing any word in general, not specifically adverbs.

OG Verbal review 2: SC 74 is about misplaced word.

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New post 21 Feb 2017, 01:43
(A) The phrase with the rest of the family is misplaced, making it sound as if the subject of the sentence and the rest of the family were planning to pay the fees together.

My question - how do you know the intention of this sentence is NOT "she and the rest of the family were going to pay together"??

Can anyone please help answer?

Thanks.

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New post 25 Feb 2017, 04:10
Atbr1602 wrote:
(A) The phrase with the rest of the family is misplaced, making it sound as if the subject of the sentence and the rest of the family were planning to pay the fees together.

My question - how do you know the intention of this sentence is NOT "she and the rest of the family were going to pay together"??

Can anyone please help answer?

Thanks.


It would be quite awkward if all the family members opened a joint bank account to make the payment together, or they all went to the fees counter together to hand over the money.

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New post 07 Mar 2017, 22:36
please explain how do we know if "which" can modify the a noun slightly away. Here is an answer from another question

B. the passage of the Anti-Cybersquatting Consumer Protection Act in 1999, which allows companies to seek up to $100000 in damages against those who register domain names with the sole intent that they will sell
https://gmatclub.com/forum/v07-184948.html

This answer choice is considered wrong because which modifies in 1999 why cant it modify the Act (slightly far away noun)?

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Shiridip wrote:
please explain how do we know if "which" can modify the a noun slightly away. Here is an answer from another question

B. the passage of the Anti-Cybersquatting Consumer Protection Act in 1999, which allows companies to seek up to $100000 in damages against those who register domain names with the sole intent that they will sell
https://gmatclub.com/forum/v07-184948.html

This answer choice is considered wrong because which modifies in 1999 why cant it modify the Act (slightly far away noun)?


Ideally a modifier should follow the modifier touch rule, but there are some exceptions to the rule. Following is an excerpt from Manhattan SC guide that describes one such exception:

In general, noun modifiers must touch their nouns. However, there are a few exceptions to the Touch
Rule.
1. A “mission-critical” modifier falls between. This modifier is often an Of phrase that defines the noun. The less important modifier refers to the noun plus the first modifier.
Right: He had a wav OF DODGING OPPONENTS that impressed the scouts.
Here, the “mission-critical” modifier of dodging opponents defines the noun way. Without this modifier, the noun way is almost meaningless. In turn, the modifier that impressed the scouts modifies the entire noun phrase a way of dodging opponents.

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New post 16 Mar 2017, 01:37
Hi,
Could you clarify whether grammatically there is a difference between 'agreed verbally' and 'verbally agreed'?

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New post 19 Mar 2017, 19:21
sid92shetty wrote:
Hi,
Could you clarify whether grammatically there is a difference between 'agreed verbally' and 'verbally agreed'?


An adverb can be placed before or after a verb - 'agreed verbally' and 'verbally agreed' are equivalent.

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New post 03 Apr 2017, 06:51
Hi, dear expert.

I am still very confused by the explanation. So what exactly the sentence trying to imply? Does the sentence mean: She agreed with that the costs of studies would be paid by the rest of her family? However, she would still continue to pay herself?

And the other question, I do not see how it would change the meaning by moving "verbally" from front of "agreed" to behind. Please explain what is wrong with that.

Thank you very much.

Summer.

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New post 08 Apr 2017, 11:52
summer127 wrote:
Hi, dear expert.

I am still very confused by the explanation. So what exactly the sentence trying to imply? Does the sentence mean: She agreed with that the costs of studies would be paid by the rest of her family? However, she would still continue to pay herself?

And the other question, I do not see how it would change the meaning by moving "verbally" from front of "agreed" to behind. Please explain what is wrong with that.

Thank you very much.

Summer.


The sentence implies that the agreement (to pay by herself) was with the rest of the family, not that she, along with her family, would pay.

For your second query, please see my post above.

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