GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 17 Oct 2019, 23:40

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

V61-03

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Founder
Founder
User avatar
V
Joined: 04 Dec 2002
Posts: 18213
Location: United States (WA)
GMAT 1: 750 Q49 V42
GPA: 3.5
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
V61-03  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Sep 2018, 00:00
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

50% (01:39) correct 50% (02:37) wrong based on 4 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

A discovery made by two Australian researchers, Barry Marshall and John Warren, revolutionized the scientific community's understanding of peptic ulcer disease and transformed the illness from a chronic, frequently disabling condition to one that can be cured by a short regimen of antibiotics.
In 1981, the two researchers first began to work together. Their discovery came about after Warren had observed bacteria in the lower part of the stomach of patients, which contradicted the long-held belief that bacteria could not survive in the acidic stomach environment. Warren also noticed that signs of inflammation were always present close to the bacteria. While conducting further studies on more patients, Warren and Marshall found H. pylori bacteria present in almost all patients with stomach inflammation or ulcers in the stomach. The two hypothesized that there was a causal link between H. pylori and ulcers, and that ulcers were not caused by stress, as previously thought. In order to support their controversial claims, they experimented on animals, and when this turned out to be unsuccessful, Marshall took it upon himself to be his own guinea pig. After verifying that he did not already have H. pylori in his stomach, Marshall drank a concoction made from cultured bacteria. Within a few days, he came down with gastritis, and H. pylori were found in his inflamed stomach; he was then cured with the help of antibiotics.
The researchers' findings were so contentious that it took ten years for their work to be accepted. Many researchers tried to disprove their findings, but failed to do so. Despite this, numerous scientists and doctors remained doubtful and refused to believe that any bacteria could live in the acidic environment of the stomach. According to Marshall, the pharmaceutical industry also had a role in preventing their bacteria theory from gaining traction. At the time, the most common treatment for ulcers was antacids, which required constant use, since the symptoms would return immediately after patients stopped taking them. Hence, the notion that ulcers could be permanently cured by taking antibiotics was highly unappealing to the pharmaceutical companies. By 1994, however, the evidence was overwhelming, prompting a change in the treatment of ulcers and establishing antibiotics as the standard approach. Finally, in 2005 Warren and Marshall received the praise they so clearly deserved, winning the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their innovative work.

It can be inferred from the passage that Warren and Marshall’s conclusion is based on which of the following claims?

A. Animals cannot be infected with H. pylori bacteria.
B. H. pylori bacterial infection is not caused by stress.
C. Bacterial infection can be cured with antibiotics.
D. Experiments that had been conducted thus far on the cause of ulcers were not accurate enough.
E. Pharmaceutical companies wanted to hide the real cause of ulcers.

_________________
Founder of GMAT Club

Just starting out with GMAT? Start here...

Discover Your Admit Options with Decision Tracker Filters!
Founder
Founder
User avatar
V
Joined: 04 Dec 2002
Posts: 18213
Location: United States (WA)
GMAT 1: 750 Q49 V42
GPA: 3.5
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Re V61-03  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Sep 2018, 00:00
Official Solution:

A discovery made by two Australian researchers, Barry Marshall and John Warren, revolutionized the scientific community's understanding of peptic ulcer disease and transformed the illness from a chronic, frequently disabling condition to one that can be cured by a short regimen of antibiotics.
In 1981, the two researchers first began to work together. Their discovery came about after Warren had observed bacteria in the lower part of the stomach of patients, which contradicted the long-held belief that bacteria could not survive in the acidic stomach environment. Warren also noticed that signs of inflammation were always present close to the bacteria. While conducting further studies on more patients, Warren and Marshall found H. pylori bacteria present in almost all patients with stomach inflammation or ulcers in the stomach. The two hypothesized that there was a causal link between H. pylori and ulcers, and that ulcers were not caused by stress, as previously thought. In order to support their controversial claims, they experimented on animals, and when this turned out to be unsuccessful, Marshall took it upon himself to be his own guinea pig. After verifying that he did not already have H. pylori in his stomach, Marshall drank a concoction made from cultured bacteria. Within a few days, he came down with gastritis, and H. pylori were found in his inflamed stomach; he was then cured with the help of antibiotics.
The researchers' findings were so contentious that it took ten years for their work to be accepted. Many researchers tried to disprove their findings, but failed to do so. Despite this, numerous scientists and doctors remained doubtful and refused to believe that any bacteria could live in the acidic environment of the stomach. According to Marshall, the pharmaceutical industry also had a role in preventing their bacteria theory from gaining traction. At the time, the most common treatment for ulcers was antacids, which required constant use, since the symptoms would return immediately after patients stopped taking them. Hence, the notion that ulcers could be permanently cured by taking antibiotics was highly unappealing to the pharmaceutical companies. By 1994, however, the evidence was overwhelming, prompting a change in the treatment of ulcers and establishing antibiotics as the standard approach. Finally, in 2005 Warren and Marshall received the praise they so clearly deserved, winning the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their innovative work.


It can be inferred from the passage that Warren and Marshall’s conclusion is based on which of the following claims?

A. Animals cannot be infected with H. pylori bacteria.
B. H. pylori bacterial infection is not caused by stress.
C. Bacterial infection can be cured with antibiotics.
D. Experiments that had been conducted thus far on the cause of ulcers were not accurate enough.
E. Pharmaceutical companies wanted to hide the real cause of ulcers.

We’ll go for ExamPal Strategy called PRECISE because the answer appears in the text explicitly.

It is stated that the researchers “hypothesized… that ulcers were not caused by stress as previously thought”, and that the testing of this hypothesis led to their discovery.


This question was provided by ExamPal

Answer: B
_________________
Founder of GMAT Club

Just starting out with GMAT? Start here...

Discover Your Admit Options with Decision Tracker Filters!
Intern
Intern
avatar
S
Joined: 30 Apr 2018
Posts: 34
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, General Management
GMAT 1: 760 Q51 V42
GPA: 4
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Re: V61-03  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Sep 2018, 14:18
can someone please explain how is C incorrect?
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 18 May 2017
Posts: 1
Re: V61-03  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Dec 2018, 06:39
Bacterial infection can be cured with antibiotics is just an additional info, nothing contributing towards the conclusion
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 12 Nov 2018
Posts: 1
Re: V61-03  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Dec 2018, 11:11
1
"The two hypothesized that there was a causal link between H. pylori and ulcers, and that ulcers were not caused by stress".

Are pylori and ulcers the same thing? It assumes that ulcers are not caused by stress, not pylori
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 20 Nov 2018
Posts: 19
Re V61-03  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Jun 2019, 05:35
1
I think this is a high-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. Option C should be the answer to this question.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 16 Apr 2019
Posts: 12
Re: V61-03  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jul 2019, 08:47
1
bb wrote:
Official Solution:

A discovery made by two Australian researchers, Barry Marshall and John Warren, revolutionized the scientific community's understanding of peptic ulcer disease and transformed the illness from a chronic, frequently disabling condition to one that can be cured by a short regimen of antibiotics.
In 1981, the two researchers first began to work together. Their discovery came about after Warren had observed bacteria in the lower part of the stomach of patients, which contradicted the long-held belief that bacteria could not survive in the acidic stomach environment. Warren also noticed that signs of inflammation were always present close to the bacteria. While conducting further studies on more patients, Warren and Marshall found H. pylori bacteria present in almost all patients with stomach inflammation or ulcers in the stomach. The two hypothesized that there was a causal link between H. pylori and ulcers, and that ulcers were not caused by stress, as previously thought. In order to support their controversial claims, they experimented on animals, and when this turned out to be unsuccessful, Marshall took it upon himself to be his own guinea pig. After verifying that he did not already have H. pylori in his stomach, Marshall drank a concoction made from cultured bacteria. Within a few days, he came down with gastritis, and H. pylori were found in his inflamed stomach; he was then cured with the help of antibiotics.
The researchers' findings were so contentious that it took ten years for their work to be accepted. Many researchers tried to disprove their findings, but failed to do so. Despite this, numerous scientists and doctors remained doubtful and refused to believe that any bacteria could live in the acidic environment of the stomach. According to Marshall, the pharmaceutical industry also had a role in preventing their bacteria theory from gaining traction. At the time, the most common treatment for ulcers was antacids, which required constant use, since the symptoms would return immediately after patients stopped taking them. Hence, the notion that ulcers could be permanently cured by taking antibiotics was highly unappealing to the pharmaceutical companies. By 1994, however, the evidence was overwhelming, prompting a change in the treatment of ulcers and establishing antibiotics as the standard approach. Finally, in 2005 Warren and Marshall received the praise they so clearly deserved, winning the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their innovative work.


It can be inferred from the passage that Warren and Marshall’s conclusion is based on which of the following claims?

A. Animals cannot be infected with H. pylori bacteria.
B. H. pylori bacterial infection is not caused by stress.
C. Bacterial infection can be cured with antibiotics.
D. Experiments that had been conducted thus far on the cause of ulcers were not accurate enough.
E. Pharmaceutical companies wanted to hide the real cause of ulcers.

We’ll go for ExamPal Strategy called PRECISE because the answer appears in the text explicitly.

It is stated that the researchers “hypothesized… that ulcers were not caused by stress as previously thought”, and that the testing of this hypothesis led to their discovery.


This question was provided by ExamPal

Answer: B



It is mentioned in the passage that, "ulcers were not caused by stress" not that "H. pylori bacterial infection is not caused by stress" and as per the passage, earlier researchers denied bacterial existence in the stomach. Hence, this answer choice does not clearly express the point.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: V61-03   [#permalink] 19 Jul 2019, 08:47
Display posts from previous: Sort by

V61-03

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderators: chetan2u, Bunuel






Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne