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Verbal Focus: How to Master Every Critical Reasoning Question Type

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Joined: 19 Mar 2012
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GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
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Verbal Focus: How to Master Every Critical Reasoning Question Type [#permalink]

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New post 30 Nov 2016, 11:09
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How to Master Every Critical Reasoning Question Type



Has Critical Reasoning been driving you crazy? Do you keep getting tangled up in arguments, agonizing back and forth between answers, or picking an answer confidently only to find that you fell straight into a trap? This article is here to save you.
It’s going to take some work, but if you follow these steps, you’ll see your CR performance improve significantly. Ready? Let’s do this!

Open up an Excel spreadsheet…


Now, set up this template on the first worksheet:

Attachment:
Picture1.png
Picture1.png [ 269.42 KiB | Viewed 4898 times ]


Label this first worksheet your Key.
Are you wondering why I didn’t just give you an Excel file with this template? I specifically want you to type out each step and think about what it means. You’re about to apply this analysis to the different question types; you’ll do so more effectively if you have a solid understanding of what you’re trying to accomplish.
If you aren’t using Manhattan Prep’s CR book, then read my blog post on our CR process. It explains the four steps listed above.

…now create new worksheets in the spreadsheet…



You’re going to need a total of 10 worksheets, including the first worksheet that you already created above. Copy that worksheet 9 times.
Now label those other 9 questions in this way (and in this order!):
Assump (for Find the Assumption)
Str (for Strengthen the Argument)
Weak (for Weaken the Argument)
Infer (for Inference)
Discrep (for Find the Discrepancy)
Role (for Describe the Role) (could also call this BF for Boldface)
Eval (for Evaluate the Argument)
Flaw (for Find the Flaw)
DA (for Describe the Argument)
I put these in this order because this is the rough order of importance based on the frequency with which these are tested. The three most common types are Assumption, Strengthen, and Weaken; you will most likely see more than one of each of these. After that, the next four (Infer, Discrepancy, Role, and Evaluate) are about equally common; you will most likely see just one of each. The Flaw and Describe the Argument questions are the least frequently seen; you may or may not see one of these.

…and start filling out your templates!



Each question type now has its own worksheet with the template. Your task is to start replacing the template with your answers to those questions for each question type. Get going!

… (is that all?)



Okay. I’ll give you a little more.
Here’s what I have in my template for the Describe the Role question type. (I chose a medium-frequency one because I really want you to put the three most common ones in your own words. You’re going to use those the most.)

Attachment:
Picture2.png
Picture2.png [ 245.58 KiB | Viewed 4842 times ]


Ready? Set? Go!



Okay, you’ve got your instructions—now go make it happen! This template will help you to know exactly what to ask yourself and what to examine while you’re working through any CR problem.
Want to test out your templates? Take a look at this Master Resource CR article. It contains links to articles on every type of CR problem with the exception of Describe the Argument (these are really pretty rare). Each article gives you a problem to try (from the free resources in GMAT Prep) and then analyzes it thoroughly using this same 4-step process.
Happy Studying!
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Joined: 16 Jan 2018
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GMAT 1: 600 Q40 V33
Verbal Focus: How to Master Every Critical Reasoning Question Type [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2018, 18:26
souvik101990 wrote:

How to Master Every Critical Reasoning Question Type



Has Critical Reasoning been driving you crazy? Do you keep getting tangled up in arguments, agonizing back and forth between answers, or picking an answer confidently only to find that you fell straight into a trap? This article is here to save you.
It’s going to take some work, but if you follow these steps, you’ll see your CR performance improve significantly. Ready? Let’s do this!

Open up an Excel spreadsheet…


Now, set up this template on the first worksheet:

Attachment:
The attachment Picture1.png is no longer available


Label this first worksheet your Key.
Are you wondering why I didn’t just give you an Excel file with this template? I specifically want you to type out each step and think about what it means. You’re about to apply this analysis to the different question types; you’ll do so more effectively if you have a solid understanding of what you’re trying to accomplish.
If you aren’t using Manhattan Prep’s CR book, then read my blog post on our CR process. It explains the four steps listed above.

…now create new worksheets in the spreadsheet…



You’re going to need a total of 10 worksheets, including the first worksheet that you already created above. Copy that worksheet 9 times.
Now label those other 9 questions in this way (and in this order!):
Assump (for Find the Assumption)
Str (for Strengthen the Argument)
Weak (for Weaken the Argument)
Infer (for Inference)
Discrep (for Find the Discrepancy)
Role (for Describe the Role) (could also call this BF for Boldface)
Eval (for Evaluate the Argument)
Flaw (for Find the Flaw)
DA (for Describe the Argument)
I put these in this order because this is the rough order of importance based on the frequency with which these are tested. The three most common types are Assumption, Strengthen, and Weaken; you will most likely see more than one of each of these. After that, the next four (Infer, Discrepancy, Role, and Evaluate) are about equally common; you will most likely see just one of each. The Flaw and Describe the Argument questions are the least frequently seen; you may or may not see one of these.

…and start filling out your templates!



Each question type now has its own worksheet with the template. Your task is to start replacing the template with your answers to those questions for each question type. Get going!

… (is that all?)



Okay. I’ll give you a little more.
Here’s what I have in my template for the Describe the Role question type. (I chose a medium-frequency one because I really want you to put the three most common ones in your own words. You’re going to use those the most.)

Attachment:
The attachment Picture2.png is no longer available


Ready? Set? Go!



Okay, you’ve got your instructions—now go make it happen! This template will help you to know exactly what to ask yourself and what to examine while you’re working through any CR problem.
Want to test out your templates? Take a look at this Master Resource CR article. It contains links to articles on every type of CR problem with the exception of Describe the Argument (these are really pretty rare). Each article gives you a problem to try (from the free resources in GMAT Prep) and then analyzes it thoroughly using this same 4-step process.
Happy Studying!


I came up with this of my own for assumption questions. i hope it looks ok. I will edit as and when i solve more questions.
Attachments

Critical reasoning assumtion type.PNG
Critical reasoning assumtion type.PNG [ 30.99 KiB | Viewed 464 times ]

Verbal Focus: How to Master Every Critical Reasoning Question Type   [#permalink] 25 Jan 2018, 18:26
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Verbal Focus: How to Master Every Critical Reasoning Question Type

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