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GMAT Tip of the Week: What Simone Biles and the Final Five Can Teach Y [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2016, 17:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: GMAT Tip of the Week: What Simone Biles and the Final Five Can Teach You About GMAT Math
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On this Friday, ending the first week of the Rio Olympics, your office has undoubtedly said the name “Simone” exponentially more than ever before. Michael Phelps’ blowout win – his 4th straight – in the 200 IM was incredible, but last night belonged to two Texans named Simone.

Swimmer Simone Manuel and gymnast Simone Biles each won historic gold medals, and if you’re at all inspired to pursue your own “go for the gold” success in business school (maybe Stanford like Manuel, or UCLA like Biles), you can learn a lot from the Olympic experience. Two lessons, in particular, stand out from the performance of Biles and her “Final Five” teammates:

Connect Your Skills

There’s no way to watch Olympic gymnastics and not be overwhelmingly impressed by the skills that each gymnast brings to competition. So at times it’s frustrating and saddening to hear the TV announcers discuss deduction after deduction; shouldn’t everyone at all times just be yelling, “Wow!!!!” at the otherworldly talents of each athlete?

Much like the GMAT, though, Olympic gymnastics is not about the sheer possession of these skills – at that level, everyone has them. It’s more about the ability to execute them and, as becomes evident from the expert commentary of Tim Dagget and Nastia Liukin, to connect them. It’s not the uneven bars handstand or release itself that wins the gold, it’s the ability to connect skill after skill as part of a routine. The line, “She was supposed to connect that skill to another…” is always followed by, “That will be a deduction” – both in Olympic gymnastics and on the GMAT.

How does that affect you?

By test day, you had better have all of the necessary skills to compete on the GMAT Quant Section. Area of a triangle, Pythagorean Theorem, Difference of Squares…if you don’t know these rules, you’re absolutely sunk. But to do really well, you need to quickly connect skill to skill, and connect items in the problems to the skills necessary to work with them. For example:

If a problem includes a term x^4 – 1, you should immediately be thinking, “That connects really well to the Difference of Squares rule: a^2 – b^2 = (a + b)(a – b), and since x^4 is a square [it’s (x^2)^2] and 1 is a square (it’s 1^2), I can write that as (x^2 + 1)(x^2 – 1), and for good measure I could apply Difference of Squares to the (x^2 – 1) term too.” The GMAT won’t ever specifically tell you, “Use the Difference of Squares,” so it’s your job to immediately connect the symptoms of Difference of Squares (an even exponent, a subtraction sign, a square of some kind, even if it’s 1) to the opportunity to use it.

If you see a right triangle, you should recognize that Area and Pythagorean Theorem easily connect. In a^2 + b^2 = c^2, sides a and b are perpendicular and allow you to use them as the base and height in the area formula. And the Pythagorean Theorem includes three squares with the opportunity to create subtraction [you could write it as a^2 = c^2 – b^2, allowing you to say that a^2 = (c + b)(c – b)…], so you could connect yet another skill to it to help solve for variables.

Similarly, if you see a square or rectangle, its diagonal is the hypotenuse of a right triangle, allowing you to use the sides as a and b in the Pythagorean setup, which could also connect to Difference of Squares…etc.

When you initially learned most of these skills in high school (much like when Biles, Aly Raisman, Gabby Douglas, etc. learned handstands and cartwheels in Gymboree), you learned them as individual, isolated skills. “Here’s the formula, and here are 10 questions that test it.” On the GMAT – as in the Olympics – you’re being tested more on your ability to connect them, to see opportunities to use a skill that’s not obvious at first (“Well, I’m not sure what to do but I do have multiple squared terms so let me try to apply Difference of Squares…or maybe I can use a and b in the Area calculation.”), but that helps you build more knowledge of the problem.

So as you study, don’t just learn individual skills. Look for opportunities to connect them, and look for signals that will tell you that a connection is possible. A rectangle problem with a square root of 3 in the answer choices should tell you “the diagonal of this rectangle may very well be connected to a 30-60-90 triangle, since those have the 1, √3, 2 side ratio…” The GMAT is about connections more so than just skills, so study accordingly.

Stick the Landing

If you’re like most in the “every four years I love gymnastics for exactly one week” camp, the single most important thing you look for on any apparatus is, “Did he/she stick the landing?” A hop or a step on the landing is the most noticeable deduction on a gymnastics routine…and the same holds true for the GMAT.

Again, the GMAT is testing you on how well you connect a variety of skills, so naturally there are places for you to finish the problem a step short. A problem that requires you to leverage the Pythagorean Theorem and the Area of a Triangle may ask for the sum of sides A and B, for example, but if you’ve solved for the sides individually first, you might see a particular value (A = 6) on your noteboard and in the answer choices and choose it without double checking that you answered the proper question.

That is a horrible and unnecessary “deduction” on your GMAT score: you did all the work right, all the hard part right (akin to the flip-and-two-twists in the air on your vault or the dazzling array of jumps and handstands on the tiny beam) and then botched the landing.

On problems that include more than one variable, circle the variable that the test is looking for and then make sure that you submit the proper answer for that variable. If a problem asks for a combination of variables (a + b, for example), write that down at the top of your scratchwork and go back to it after you’ve calculated. Take active steps to ensure that you stick the landing, because nothing is worse than doing all the work right and then still getting the problem wrong.

In summary, recognize that there are plenty of similarities between the GMAT and GyMnAsTics [the scoring system is too complex for the layman to worry about, the “Final Five” are more important than you think (hint: the test can’t really use the last five questions of a section for research purposes since so many people are rushing and guessing), etc.]. So take a lesson from Simone Biles and her gold-medal-winning teammates: connect your skills, stick the landing, and you’ll see your score vault to Olympian heights.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter!

By Brian Galvin.

The post GMAT Tip of the Week: What Simone Biles and the Final Five Can Teach You About GMAT Math appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: Know Your Subtraction for the GMAT! [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2016, 16:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: Know Your Subtraction for the GMAT!
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Your first reaction to the title of this post is probably, “I already know my subtraction!” No surprise there. But what is surprising is that our statistics tell us that the following GMAT question – which is nothing extraordinary, but does involve some tricky subtraction – is a 700-level question. That made us decide to write this post. We will discuss this concept along with the question:

The last digit of 12^12 + 13^13 – 14^14 × 15^15 =

(A) 0

(B) 1

(C) 5

(D) 8

(E) 9

This is a simple question based on the cyclicity of units digits. There are 3 terms here: 12^12, 13^13 and (14^14)*(15^15). Let’s find the last digit of each of these terms:

12^12

The units digit of 12 is 2.

2 has a cyclicity of 2 – 4 – 8 – 6.

The cycles end at the powers 4, 8, 12 … etc. So, twelve 2’s will end in a units digit of 6.

13^13

The units digit of 13 is 3.

3 has a cyclicity of 3 – 9 – 7 – 1.

A new cycle starts at the powers 1, 5, 9, 13 … etc. So, thirteen 3’s will end in a units digit of 3.

(14^14)*(15^15)

This term is actually the most simple to manage in the case of its units digit – an even number multiplied by a multiple of 5 will end in 0. Also, note that this will be a huge term compared to the other two terms.

This is what our expression looks like when we consider just the units digits of these terms:

(A number ending in 6) + (A number ending in 3) – (A much greater number ending in 0)

Looking at our most basic options, a number ending in 6 added to a number ending in 3 will give us a number ending in 9 (as 3 + 6 = 9). So, the expression now looks like this:

(A number ending in 9) – (A much greater number ending in 0)

It is at this point that many people mess up. They deduce that 9-0 will end in a 9, and hence, the answer will be E. All their effort goes to waste when they do this. Let’s see why:

How do you subtract one number out of another? Take, for example, 10-7 = 3

This can also be written as 7-10 = -3. (Here, you are still subtracting the number with a lower absolute value from the number with a greater absolute value, but giving it a negative sign.)

Let’s try to look at this in tabular form. The number with the greater absolute value goes on the top and the number with the smaller absolute value goes under it. You then subtract and the result gets the sign of the number with the greater absolute value.

(i) 100-29

100

-29

071

(ii) 29-100

100

-29

071

(But since the sign of 100 is negative, your answer is actually -71.)

So, the number with greater absolute value is always on top. Going back to our original question now, (A number ending in 9) – (A much greater number ending in 0) will look like:

abcd0

–  pq9

ghjk1

Ignoring the letter variables (these are simply placeholders), note that the greater number ending in 0 will be on the top and the smaller one ending in 9 will be below it. This means the answer will be a negative number ending in a units digit of 1. Therefore, our answer is B.

As we learn more advanced concepts, make sure you are not taking your basic principles for granted!

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: Know Your Subtraction for the GMAT! appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Invest in Your Success: Preparing for the GMAT in 3, 2, 1 Months [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2016, 17:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Invest in Your Success: Preparing for the GMAT in 3, 2, 1 Months
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Are you planning to pursue your MBA? If so, you probably know that most business schools take special notice of applicants who have high scores on the GMAT. In order to perform well on the GMAT, you have to dedicate a reasonable amount of time to study. This brings up the question, “How long does it take to prepare for the GMAT?” Check out some tips to consider when creating your study plan for the GMAT:

Things to Consider Before Starting the Study Process

Before estimating your GMAT preparation time, it’s a good idea to look at the application deadlines for the business schools you’re interested in. Ideally, you want to submit your GMAT scores by a school’s application deadline. For example, a business school might have an application deadline of Oct. 5. Taking the GMAT in August would allow you enough time to retake the test if you’re not satisfied with your score. And if you’re taking the GMAT in August, you could also start studying in May to allow yourself three months of GMAT preparation time.

When you study with our instructors at Veritas Prep, you’ll learn how to approach the questions on the GMAT. Our GMAT curriculum zeros in on each subject within the four sections. We reveal subtleties of the test that can help you avoid common mistakes and achieve a high score.

How to Prepare for the GMAT in 3 Months

Three months is an optimal amount of time to prepare for the GMAT. Naturally, many prospective MBA students want to know the specifics of how to prepare for the GMAT in 3 months. Of course, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer when it comes to a study schedule. Some people study for three hours per day, five days a week, while others study for two hours a day, seven days a week.

After looking at your practice test results, you may see that you did well on algebra and basic arithmetic questions but need to work on geometry and Data Sufficiency problems, so a two-hour study period on one day may begin with 30 minutes of quizzing yourself with geometry flashcards and 30 minutes of practice problems. The second hour could be dedicated to Data Sufficiency study – this involves evaluating Data Sufficiency questions to practice weeding out unessential information.

During each week of the three-month period, you could work on Quantitative skills for two days, Verbal skills for two days, Integrated Reasoning skills for two days, and Analytical Writing for one. Varying a study schedule helps you cover all of the skills you need to practice and keeps you from growing tired of the routine.

Two Months to Prepare for the Test

Perhaps you’re wondering how to prepare for the GMAT in 2 months. Two months is a relatively short time to study for the GMAT, but it can work, especially if you get impressive results on your practice tests.

One tip is to study for two or three hours several days a week. If your test results reveal that you need to strengthen your Reading Comprehension skills, try increasing the amount of reading you do. Reading financial magazines and newspapers can give you practice with evaluating an author’s intentions and finding the main ideas. Alternatively, if your practice test reveals the need to work on basic arithmetic, you can spend 30 minutes each study period with flashcards containing fractions, percentages and probability problems. Let your practice test results guide your study to make it efficient.

One Month to Prepare for the Test

But what if you’re short on time and need to know how to prepare for the GMAT in 1 month? Once again, your practice test results should guide you in your studies. If you have just one month to prepare, it’s best to study for two or three hours each day of the week.

If you need to strengthen your Analytical Writing skills, find some high-scoring GMAT essays to study. These will help you to see what elements you need to include in your own practice essays. If you find that you run out of time on a practice test in the Quantitative section, work on establishing a pace that allows you to finish in time. Most importantly, create a study schedule ahead of time and follow it closely throughout the month so you give each subject enough attention.

Veritas Prep’s instructors stand ready to help, no matter how many months you have to prepare for the GMAT. Our prep courses are available both online and in person. Contact our offices today to start studying for the GMAT!

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter!

The post Invest in Your Success: Preparing for the GMAT in 3, 2, 1 Months appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Early Thoughts on Dartmouth Tuck’s 2016-2017 Application Essay Questio [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2016, 11:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Early Thoughts on Dartmouth Tuck’s 2016-2017 Application Essay Questions
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Application season at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth is officially underway with the release of the school’s 2016-2017 essay questions. Let’s discuss from a high level some early thoughts on how best to approach theseupdatedessay prompts. With all of your essays for Tuck, treat your responses holistically and try to paint a complete picture of your candidacy within the school-specific suite of essay questions.

Essay 1:

Tuck educates wise leaders who better the world of business. What are your short- and long-term goals? How will a Tuck MBA enable you to become a wise leader with global impact? (500 to 700 words)

This essay is Tuck’s take on the common “Career Goals” essay. Tuck returns this year with an updated approach to this essay that asks applicants to hone in on the leadership and impact aspects of their career goals. This is a great opportunity to really show the school how you plan to become a global change agent, and how Tuck is the ideal place to help you manifest this goal. School research is key here, so make sure your school interest aligns with Tuck’s strong value system.

Leadership is not typically an item that is directly called upon in a career essay prompt, so this should be a clear focus in your response. Tuck is looking for candidates who are aspirational and who truly see themselves making an impact on the world around them through a leadership role, so think through how your career goals will do that and make sure to frame your future plans in the context of leadership.

Essay 2:

As a diverse and global community, our students arrive at the same place from many different paths. Tell us about an experience in which you have had to live, learn and/or work with other people very different from yourself. What challenges and/or opportunities did you experience, how did you respond, and what did you learn about yourself as a result? (500 words)

Attending Tuck is a very different MBA experience than one might have at other programs – from the remote location, to the small class size, to the close community, it is your job to convince the Admissions Committee that you are a strong fit for this unique student experience.

In your response, it is important to directly address each point of the prompt while highlighting your strong fit with the Tuck MBA. Tuck is known for their unique culture and strong alumni network, so your evaluation by the Admissions Committee will be based on how well you will fit into their student community.

Don’t limit yourself to just professional examples here; this prompt is purposefully open-ended, so whichever direction you choose to go should showcase a cross-section of both your interpersonal skills and comfort in interacting with people from various walks of life. The experience you select should have a good deal of depth so you are able to address each aspect of the prompt in great detail. Make sure you also connect the dots for the Admissions Committee by detailing the impact this experience had on you, the lessons you learned from it, and how it will factor into your contributions as a Tuck MBA.

Just a few thoughts on the new batch of essays from Tuck – hopefully this will help you get started. For more thoughts on Tuck and its application essays, check out our free Essential Guide to Top Business Schools.

Applying to Dartmouth Tuck or other business schools? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can read more articles by him here.

The post Early Thoughts on Dartmouth Tuck’s 2016-2017 Application Essay Questions appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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When to Pick Your Own Numbers on GMAT Quant Questions [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2016, 11:01
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: When to Pick Your Own Numbers on GMAT Quant Questions
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The other day, while working with a tutoring student, I was enumerating the virtues of various test-taking strategies when the student sheepishly interrupted my eloquent paean to picking numbers. She’d read somewhere that these strategies were fine for easy to moderate questions, but that for the toughest questions, you just had to bear down and solve the problem formally. Clearly, she is not a regular reader of our fine blog.

As luck would have it, on her previous practice exam she’d received the following problem, which both illustrates the value of picking numbers and demonstrates why this approach works so well.

A total of 30 percent of the geese included in a certain migration study were male. If some of the geese migrated during the study and 20 percent of the migrating geese were male, what was the ratio of the migration rate for the male geese to the migration rate for the female geese?

[Migration rate for geese of a certain sex = (number of geese of that sex migrating) / (total number of geese of that sex)]

A) 1/4

B) 7/12

C) 2/3

D) 7/8

E) 8/7

This is a perfect opportunity to break out two of my favorite GMAT tools: picking numbers and making charts. So, let’s say there are 100 geese in our population. That means that if 30% are male, we’ll have 30 male geese and 70 females geese, giving us the following chart:

Male
Female
Total

Migrating

Not-Migrating

Total
30
70
100

Now, let’s say 10 geese were migrating. That means that 90 were not migrating. Moreover, if 20 percent of the migrating geese were male, we know that we’ll have 2 migrating males and 8 migrating females, giving us the following:

Male
Female
Total

Migrating
2
8
10

Not-Migrating

Total
30
70
100

(Note that if we wanted to, we could fill out the rest of the chart, but there’s no reason to, especially when we’re trying to save as much time as possible.)

Our migration rate for the male geese is 2/30 or 1/15. Our migration rate for the female geese is 8/70 or 4/35. Ultimately, we want the ratio of the male migration rate (1/15) to the female migration rate (4/35), so we need to simplify (1/15)/(4/35), or (1*35)/(15*4) = 35/60 = 7/12. And we’re done – B is our answer.

My student was skeptical. How did we know that 10 geese were migrating? What if 20 geese were migrating? Or 50? Shouldn’t that change the result? This is the beauty of picking numbers – it doesn’t matter what number we pick (so long as we don’t end up with an illogical scenario in which, say, the number of migrating male geese is greater than the number of total male geese). To see why, watch what happens when we do this algebraically:

Say that we have a total of “t” geese. If 30% are male, we’ll have 0.30t male geese and 0.70t females geese.  Now, let’s call the migrating geese “m.” If 20% are male, we’ll have 0.20m migrating males and 0.80m migrating females. Now our chart will look like this:

Male
Female
Total

Migrating
0.20m
0.80m
m

Not-Migrating

Total
0.30t
0.70t
t

The migration rate for the male geese is 0.20m/0.30t or 2m/3t. The migration rate for the female geese is 0.80m/0.70t or 8m/7t. We want the ratio of the male migration rate (2m/3t) to the female migration rate (8m/7t), so we need to simplify (2m/3t)/(8m/7t) = (2m*7t)/(3t * 8m) = 14mt/24mt = 7mt/12mt = 7/12. It’s clear now why the numbers we picked for m and t don’t matter – they cancel out in the end.

Takeaway: We cannot say this enough: the GMAT is not testing your ability to do formal algebra. It’s testing your ability to make good decisions in a stressful environment. So your goal, when preparing for this test, isn’t to become a virtuoso mathematician, even for the toughest questions. It’s to practice the kind of simple creative thinking that will get you to your answer with the smallest investment of your time.

Plan on taking the GMAT soon? We have GMAT prep courses starting all the time. And be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter!

By David Goldstein, a Veritas Prep GMAT instructor based in Boston. You can find more articles written by him here.

The post When to Pick Your Own Numbers on GMAT Quant Questions appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Important GRE Math Formulas to Know Going Into the Exam [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2016, 12:01
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Important GRE Math Formulas to Know Going Into the Exam
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The Quantitative Reasoning section is just one of three parts of the GRE. In this section, students must answer algebra, arithmetic, geometry, and data analysis questions. In order to prep for this section of the test, students must take time to learn some GRE math formulas, as these formulas aren’t provided on the test. Check out some examples of math formulas for GRE questions and get some tips on how to master this section of the exam.

Examples of GRE Math Formulas

  • Slope-intercept: y = mx + b
  • Distance = Rate * Time or D = RT
  • Average Speed = Total Distance/Total Time
  • For squares: Perimeter = 4s (side); Area = s2
  • For rectangles: Area = Length * Width or A= lw; Perimeter= 2l + 2w
  • For polygons: Total degrees = 180(n-2), where n = the number of sides
  • For circles: Area = πr2 , Circumference = 2πr
Tips for the Quantitative Section

As a student works through this portion of the test, it’s helpful to scan through the answer options and eliminate those that are clearly incorrect. Crossing out these options helps to make a math problem more manageable for a student. Plus, the student doesn’t have to waste time considering answer options that are definitely not going to work.

A second tip is to work problems out on scrap paper. This is especially beneficial when working on word problems – a student is able to see all of the parts of a problem without having to mentally juggle a lot of figures. Furthermore, if a student arrives at an answer that doesn’t match up with any of the options, they can go back to the work on the scrap paper to find the mistake.

Students may want to get into the habit of estimating the answer before considering any of the answer options. This gives the student a rough idea of what the answer looks like before choosing the official solution from the multiple options.

In order to save test time, it’s also a good idea for students to skip extremely puzzling questions and return to them later on in the test period. A student who spends too much time on one problem in the quantitative reasoning section is likely to run out of time before finishing the rest of the section. Students who take the computer-delivered version of the GRE are able to use a convenient “mark and review” tool that helps them to remember the questions that were skipped and go back to them.

Studying for the Quantitative Section

Memorizing math formulas for GRE questions is just one of the effective ways to study for the GRE. Working on practice math problems is another way to prep for the test. This gives a student the opportunity to practice using those math formulas. As they work through a variety of problems, students can become familiar with when to use a particular GRE math formula.

Some students find it helpful to make flash cards with math formulas on them. They can quiz themselves by holding up a flash card with a GRE math formula on it. Next, the student should successfully complete a problem using that formula.

Online math games are another study tool used by many students. Games can be a fun way for students to refresh their algebra skills or get reacquainted with the rules of geometry. Some students like to pair with another person to play these types of math games. Competing with a friend to see who can score more points and end up with more correct answers can be motivating to many students who plan to take the GRE. Plus, it’s always helpful to hear encouraging words from a friend.

All of our GRE instructors at Veritas Prep have taken the exam and achieved impressive scores. They are familiar with the subtleties of this challenging test. In short, our students learn from instructors who know what it takes to master the Quantitative Reasoning section as well as the other sections on the GRE. Our instructors help students to learn the math formulas they need to know to take on the test with confidence. We offer in-person and online courses in which students can get test-taking strategies from the experts. Contact Veritas Prep today!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

The post Important GRE Math Formulas to Know Going Into the Exam appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Live Chat Event Helps You Find the Right College Match [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2016, 14:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Live Chat Event Helps You Find the Right College Match
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Deciding which college to attend can seem like an overwhelming decision. How do you know what type of school is best for you? Which are the best degree programs? And once you decide on a school, what will it take to get in?

There’s now a website – CollegeWeekLive.com – where these questions can be answered in live chats with colleges and education experts. Nearly one million high school students a year visit CollegeWeekLive.com to text and video chat with admissions counselors at colleges and universities around the country.

Throughout the year, you can watch live presentations or join a one-on-one or group chat to ask anything you’d like about topics like classes, professors, degree programs, campus life, dorm rooms, and more. Many of the participating colleges also have live chats hosted by some of their current students who can give you plenty of insider advice about what it’s really like to live on campus.

Get Free Advice at Back to School Day

The next big event is their Back to School Day on Thursday, August 25, 2016. You and your parents can sign-up for free and login between 2:00-10:00PM EDT to:

  • Chat with representatives from 100+ colleges and universities around the country
  • Attend live presentations and Q&As with education experts
  • Enter to win a $1,000 scholarship when you research colleges during the event
Top Questions to Help You Find the Right College

Don’t be shy about asking questions during a virtual college fair. This is your chance to really get to know each school! Here are some great questions to get you started:

  • What do students seem to like best about your school?
  • What do you feel makes your school stand out?
  • What’s your favorite part of campus?
  • What fun things are there to do off campus?
  • What types of students tend to do best at your school?
  • What percentage of students get a job in their field right after graduation?
  • What test scores do I need to get admitted?
  • What advice do you have for making my application stand out?
  • What are some of your most popular degree programs?
  • Which are some of your strongest programs and why?
  • How accessible are your professors?
  • What types of scholarships are available?
  • What kind of work/study opportunities do you offer?
  • What is student housing like?
Get Advice from Admissions Experts

Education experts such as Ted Fiske of The Fiske Guide to Colleges participate in many of CollegeWeekLive’s online presentations. You can watch live presentations and ask questions during the live events, or even view the presentations on-demand.

Common presentation topics include:

  • How to write a great college essay
  • Tips on researching colleges
  • The ins and outs of college admissions
  • Finding the best scholarships
  • Preparing for the ACTs and SATs
Check out the schedule of virtual college fairs and live chats and signup for CollegeWeekLive for free.

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Playing Up Athletic Accomplishments in Your Business School Applicatio [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2016, 15:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Playing Up Athletic Accomplishments in Your Business School Applications
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For the MBA admissions game, applicants often feel that the content they should be including in their business school applications is limited to their professional and academic highlights. However, impressive personal details – such as athletic achievements and experiences – can also come in handy when building up one’s profile.

Just as a beauty pageant contestant would want to impress the competition judges with both intelligence and physical beauty, an MBA applicant will do well to win admiration from the Admissions Committee with different aspects of his or her personality, as well.

I know you are applying for a top MBA program (and not an NBA team!), but sharing that you are part of a national team or that you hold (or held) regional, age-level records in your chosen sport will still help your application. Apart from differentiating you from other candidates within your same industry, your accomplishments can also be used to show consistent character traits that have been common in your successes, which you can bring with you as you make the move to business school.

For example, you may highlight the leadership skills and drive that have allowed you to excel as captain of your soccer team as the same strengths that have been key to your success as a project manager. This will help you be more convincing when you say that these skills will enable you to be successful at the prestigious MBA program you are targeting. Likewise, accomplishments in competitive sports can also be effective in strengthening your personal brand – they could be additional illustrations of your reputation as an achiever or as a team player.

Sharing interesting personal anecdotes of how a particular athletic event changed your mindset or helped you grow as a person is another way to leverage your athletic background. Rich materials abound in this field – you can demonstrate your ability to collaborate with teammates, your resilience in overcoming personal setbacks (such as injuries or failures), and other positive traits.

One inherent advantage to showcasing your athletic background is that your stories will be easy to visualize (like an ESPN highlight reel), and the Admissions Committee will be able to better relate to the highs and lows that you share. Thus, your stories become effective set-ups for presenting lessons you have learned and how you have become the person you are today. Aside from strengthening your message by demonstrating it across various contexts, this also presents you as a multi-faceted individual.

Lastly, when presented properly, your passion for sports can be an effective “ice breaker” for your interviews or to help you build relationships with your future business school peers. Sharing a keen interest in a particular sport can develop rapport. Being associated with positive qualities such as strength, agility or gracefulness can only help you as you reach for that coveted spot at a top MBA program.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! And as always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Written by Edison Cu, a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for INSEAD.

The post Playing Up Athletic Accomplishments in Your Business School Applications appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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GMAT Math Cheat Sheet: Formulas and Tips for Success [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2016, 17:01
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: GMAT Math Cheat Sheet: Formulas and Tips for Success
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An individual who is creating a study plan for the GMAT knows that math must be a part of the equation. Though many people love all sorts of math, there are some who become worried about the Quantitative portion of the exam.

If you’re concerned about the math questions on the GMAT, it can be useful to become more familiar with the specific content in this section. Find out about the types of problems in the Quantitative section and consider some GMAT geometry formulas. Also, check out a gathering of tips on how to prep in an effective way:

What is in the Quantitative Section?

Data Sufficiency and Problem-Solving are the two types of questions in the Quantitative section. The Problem-Solving questions are multiple-choice and test your skills in algebra, basic arithmetic, and geometry. The basic arithmetic questions involve decimals, positive and negative integers, fractions, percentages, and averages. The problems you find in this section are on par with the level of material taught in high school math classes. Though many of the questions on the exam involve basic arithmetic, it’s helpful to have a GMAT formula sheet to refer to when preparing for algebra and geometry problems.

GMAT Formulas for the Math Section

Your GMAT math formulas cheat sheet should include the Pythagorean Theorem. This formula helps you to find the measurement of the third side of a right triangle when given the measurements of the other two sides. Another item on your GMAT math cheat sheet should be A = 1/2 bh, which is the formula for finding the area of a triangle. Distance = rate*time is a very helpful formula to know, too. Find the area of a rectangle in fast fashion by using the formula A = lw. The formula A = s2 will help you discover the area of a square.

Moving Beyond Memorization

A GMAT math formulas cheat sheet is an effective study tool, but it’s equally important to know which formula to apply to a problem, so you should spend time practicing problems that employ each of those formulas. This way, on test day, you’ll be familiar with the formulas and feel comfortable using them. The easiest way to do this, of course, is to let us help you.

The expert instructors at Veritas Prep partner with students to help them learn and to practice these formulas for the Quantitative section. We hire tutors who have excellent teaching skills as well as GMAT scores in the 99th percentile. When you study with us, you know you’re learning from the best! Our instructors work through practice math problems with you to ensure that you understand how to solve them in the most efficient way.

Get the Timing Right

Test-takers are given 75 minutes to tackle the 37 questions in the Quantitative section. This sounds like a long time, but if you get hung up on one question for several minutes, you could end up running out of time for this section. In order to avoid this, you should take timed practice tests. Taking timed tests allows you to establish a rhythm for solving problems and answering questions. Once you establish a rhythm, you don’t have to be so concerned about running out of time before you finish all of the problems.

More Tips for Mastering the Quantitative Section

Studying with a GMAT math cheat sheet is one way to prepare for the test. Another way to save test time and make questions more manageable is to eliminate answer options that are clearly wrong – this allows your mind to focus only on the legitimate choices. Estimating the answer to a problem as you read through it is another way to save test time and arrive at answers more quickly.

Our GMAT curriculum teaches you how to approach questions on the separate math topics within the Quantitative section. Our strategies give you the tools you need to problem-solve like a business professional! We are proud to provide both online and in-person courses that prepare you for the GMAT. Veritas Prep instructors offer solid instruction as well as encouragement to individuals with the goal of acing the GMAT and getting into a preferred business school. Let us partner with you on the road to GMAT success! Contact us to talk with one of our course advisers today.

Plan on taking the GMAT soon? We have GMAT prep courses starting all the time. And be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter!

The post GMAT Math Cheat Sheet: Formulas and Tips for Success appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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How a Mock MBA Interview Can Help You Get Into Your Dream School [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2016, 12:01
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: How a Mock MBA Interview Can Help You Get Into Your Dream School
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Congratulations, you made it to the interview stage! Now what should you do? Knowing the answers to the commonly asked MBA questions a) “Why an MBA?” b) “Why this school?” and c) “Why now?” isn’t enough. Even if you know all of the potential questions that you will need to address, a mock interview with someone who can give you honest and objective feedback will still be very helpful.

Your practice interview can offer you critical insights that may prove to be the difference between admission to your dream school and denial. Here are two reasons why you should have a mock MBA interview before the real thing:

Flow

Being well-prepared with your materials and being intelligent is not enough for a business school interview – you also need to know how to deliver your message in a natural and flowing manner.

Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore lost the one of the most narrow and controversial presidential elections in 2000. Well-known for his intelligence, Gore couldn’t connect effectively with his audience, often sounding like he was dictating a letter instead of having a conversation. In contrast, his rival, George W. Bush, came off as “somebody you would want to have beer with,” and could seemingly get away with missteps through his humor and charm.

Thus, don’t just count on your innate intelligence and knowledge in your interviews – practice your delivery, be aware of your mannerisms, and connect with your interviewer. Having a practice interview partner who can identify the bumps in your delivery can help you smooth these out through awareness and repetitions. This will help you feel more relaxed and confident, instead of having to organize your thoughts and search for precise words during the interview itself.

Facilitating mock interviews over the years, I have seen marked improvement for candidates who have gone through  these simulations before their real interviews. The difference between an interviewee who practiced and one who didn’t is night and day in terms of the flow and manner by which they get their messages across.

“Inside Words”

I remember watching an episode of The Simpsons in which the main character, Homer, blurted out loud words he thought he was only saying in his head. Thus, Homer had to remind himself of “inside words/outside words” to guide him on what he could and could not say in public.

Similarly, applicants get used to saying things that may be acceptable within their company or with their families, but may not be politically correct or appropriate for a business school interview. For example, within your team at work, you may know the “(insert nationality here) account” as the most difficult one, however, in citing this as an example during your interview, be very careful that you do not come off as associating negative traits in a generalized manner with a particular race, nationality, or other group.

Your practice interview partner can help you identify such pitfalls, not only in your words, but also through your body language, such as eye-rolls and shrugs, or even subtle changes in tone that may be sending an unintended message.

Polishing these rough edges in your delivery will allow you to shine during your MBA interview and convince the Admissions Committee that you are a gem of a find!

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! And as always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Written by Edison Cu, a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for INSEAD.

The post How a Mock MBA Interview Can Help You Get Into Your Dream School appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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How Do Language Studies Affect Your College Acceptance? [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2016, 14:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: How Do Language Studies Affect Your College Acceptance?
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Why study a foreign language? This is a question high school students often have about the courses they need to take to get into college. Other students wonder about the number of years they should dedicate to studying a foreign language. The fact is that many college admissions officials give special attention to students who participate in second-language studies. Discover a few specific reasons why college officials like to see foreign-language studies included on a student’s application:

Dedication to Learning

Why study a foreign language? It takes a dedicated student to become fluent in a second language. College admissions officials are looking for students who are constantly challenging and strengthening their skills. They are especially impressed when a student takes four years of a foreign language in high school. Students who take just two years of second-language studies have achieved the minimum requirement for most colleges. But a high school student who studies a foreign language for four years has shown dedication to getting a more thorough understanding of the language.

At Veritas Prep, we offer a free profile evaluation to students, and we look at their foreign language courses, extracurricular activities, and other qualifications to help them craft standout applications. We know how to highlight a student’s best assets, including their persistence in learning a new language.

Interest in Other Cultures

Colleges like high school students who are studying a foreign language because it shows an interest in other cultures. Part of studying the language of a foreign country involves learning about the customs and traditions of the people who live there. Interest in other cultures can help a student decide what to study in college or even what type of career to pursue. A class of college freshmen is all the more diverse if it’s filled with students who have knowledge of different people and places throughout the world.

Persistence in Mastering a Difficult Skill

College admissions officials know that it takes persistence to learn a foreign language. A student has to add to their vocabulary while working on pronunciation and constructing meaningful sentences. Also, the student must learn about the history of a country and its people. The persistence a student uses in learning a foreign language is likely to carry over into other classes. Colleges are looking for hard-working students who are eager to excel in all of their subjects. Several years of foreign-language study is an indication of a diligent student.

Earning High Scores on Standardized Tests

One of the other benefits of studying a foreign language is that this type of coursework can help students perform well on standardized tests. The logical thinking and memorization skills used to learn a foreign language in high school can assist students as they tackle questions on the SAT or the ACT. So why study foreign language? Because it can help students boost their standardized test scores and bring them a step closer to an acceptance letter from a preferred college.

Incorporating a Foreign Language in a Future Career

There are some high school students with plans to pursue careers that require knowledge of a foreign language. For instance, one high school student may dream of becoming an executive for a corporation that has offices in Japan, so the student would begin serious study of the Japanese language as a freshman in high school. After four years of Japanese study, the student would want to continue to perfect their skills in college. College admissions officials would certainly take note of a high school student with long-term goals to make use of a second language.

Our professional consultants at Veritas Prep can give students the tips and guidance they need to put together an impressive college application. Our consultants have worked in the admissions offices of the country’s most notable colleges. Consequently, students benefit from the inside experience of our staff.

For students who are wondering what their chances are of getting into a particular college, we have the College Chanculator. After typing in a few items of information, students can see how they compare to others who have already been accepted into a particular school. From online test prep to college application advice, we help high school students toward the school of their dreams!

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GMAT Tip of the Week: Making Your GMAT Score SupeRIOr to Ryan Lochte’s [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2016, 15:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: GMAT Tip of the Week: Making Your GMAT Score SupeRIOr to Ryan Lochte’s
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What’s the worst thing that can happen on your GMAT exam? Is it running out of time well before you’re done? Or blanking on nearly every math formula you’ve studied?

Whatever it is, it can’t be nearly as bad as being pulled over by fake cops – no lights or nothing, just a badge – then being told to get on the ground and having a gun placed on your forehead and being like, “whatever.” So your big event of 2016 will already go a lot better than Ryan Lochte’s did; you have that going for you.

What else do you have going for you on the GMAT? The ability to learn from the most recent few days of Lochte’s life. Lochte’s biggest mistake wasn’t vandalizing a gas station bathroom at 4am, but rather making up his own story and creating an even larger mess. And that’s a huge lesson that you need to keep in mind for the GMAT:

Don’t make up your own story.

Here’s what that means, on three major question types:

DATA SUFFICIENCY

People make up their own story on Data Sufficiency all the time. And like a prevailing theory about Lochte (he didn’t connect the vandalism of the bathroom to the men coming after him for restitution; he really did think that he had been robbed for no reason), it’s not that they’re intentionally lying. They’re just “conveniently” misremembering what they’ve read or connecting dots that weren’t actually connected in real life. Consider the question:

The product of consecutive integers a, b, c, and d is 5040. What is the value of integer d?

(1) d is prime

(2) d < c < b < a

Once people have factored 5040 into 7*8*9*10, they can then quickly recognize that Statement 1 is sufficient: the only prime number in that bunch is 7, so d must be 7. But then when it comes to Statement 2, they’ve often made up their own story. By saying “d is the smallest, and, yep, that’s 7!” they’re making up the fact that these consecutive integers are positive. That was not specifically stated! So it could be 7, 8, 9, and 10 or it could be -7, -8, -9, and -10, making d either -10 or 7. And the GMAT (maybe like an NBC interviewer?) makes it easy for you to make up your own story.

With Statement 1, prime numbers must be positive, so if you weren’t already thinking only about positives, the question format nudges you further in that direction. The answer is A when people often mistakenly choose D, and the reason is that the question makes it easy for you to make up your own story when looking at Statement 2. So before you submit an answer, always ask yourself, “Am I only using the facts explicitly provided to me, or am I somehow making up my own story?”

CRITICAL REASONING

Think of your friends who are good storytellers. We hate to break it to you, but they’re probably making at least 10-20% of those stories up. Which makes sense. “It was a pretty big fish,” is a lot less compelling than, “It was the biggest fish any of us had ever seen!” Case in point, the Olympics themselves.

No commentator this week has said that Michael Phelps, Lochte’s teammate, is “a really good swimmer.” They’re posing, “Is he the greatest athlete of all time?” because words that end in -st capture attention (and pageviews). Even Lochte was guilty of going overly-specific for dramatic effect: there was, indeed, a gun pointed at his taxi, but not resting on his forehead. His version just makes the story more exciting and dramatic…and you may very well be guilty of such a mistake on the GMAT. Consider:

About two million years ago, lava dammed up a river in western Asia and caused a small lake to form. The lake existed for about half a million years. Bones of an early human ancestor were recently found in the ancient lake bottom sediments on top of the layer of lava. Therefore, ancestors of modern humans lived in Western Asia between 2 million and 1.5 million years ago.

Which one of the following is an assumption required by the argument?

(A) There were not other lakes in the immediate area before the lava dammed up the river.

(B) The lake contained fish that the human ancestors could have used for food.

(C) The lava under the lake-bottom sediments did not contain any human fossil remains.

(D) The lake was deep enough that a person could drown in it.

(E) The bones were already in the sediments by the time the lake disappeared.

The correct answer here is E (if the bones were not already there, then they’re not good evidence that people were there during that time), but the popular trap answer is C. Consider what would happen if C were untrue: that means that there were human fossil remains that pre-date the time period in question.

But here’s where Lochte Logic is dangerous: you’re not trying to prove that the FIRST humans lived in this period at this time; you’re just trying to prove that humans lived here during that time. And whether or not there were fossils from 2.5 million or 4 million years ago doesn’t change that you still have this evidence of people in that 2 million-1.5 million years ago timeframe.

When people choose C, it’s almost always because they made up their own story about the argument – they read it as, “The earliest human ancestors lived in this place and time,” and that’s just not what’s given. Why do they do that? For Lochte’s very own reasons: it makes the story a little more interesting and a little more favorable.

After all, the average pre-MBA doesn’t spend much time reading about archaeology, but if some discovery is that level of exciting (We’ve discovered the first human! We’ve discovered evidence of aliens!) then it crosses your Facebook/Twitter feeds. You’re used to reading stories about the first/fastest/greatest/last, and so when you get dry subject matter your mind has a tendency to put those words in there subconsciously. Be careful – do not make up your own story about the conclusion!

READING COMPREHENSION

A similar phenomenon occurs with Reading Comprehension. When you read a long passage, your mind tends to connect dots that aren’t there as it fills in the rest of the story for you. Just like Lochte, who had to fill in the gap of, “Hey what would I have said if someone pointed a gun at me and told me to get on the ground? Oh right…’whatever’ is my default answer for most things,” your mind will start to fill in details that make logical sense.

The problem then comes when you’re asked an Inference question, for which the correct answer must be true based on the passage. For example, if two details in a passage are:

  • Michael swam the fastest race of his life.
  • Ryan’s race was one of the slowest he’s ever swam.
You might answer the question, “Which of the following is a conclusion that can be drawn from the passage?” with:

(A) Michael swam faster than Ryan.

Your mind – particularly amidst a lot of other text between those two facts – wants to logically arrange those two swims together, and with “fastest” for Michael and “slowest” for Ryan, it kind of seems logical that Michael was faster. But those two races are never compared directly to each other. Consider that if Michael and Ryan aren’t Phelps and Lochte, but rather filmmaker Michael Moore and Olympic champion Ryan Lochte, then of course Lochte’s slowest swim would still be way, way faster than Moore’s fastest.

Importantly, Reading Comprehension questions love to bait unwitting test-takers with comparisons as answer choices, knowing that your mind is primed to create your own story and draw comparisons that are probably true, but just not proven. So again, any time you’re faced with an answer that seems obvious, go back and ask yourself if the details you’re using were provided to you, or if instead, you’re making up your own story.

So learn a valuable lesson from Ryan Lochte and avoid making up your own story, sticking only to the clean facts of the matter. Stay true to the truth, and you’ll walk out of the test center saying “Jeah!”

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter!

By Brian Galvin.

The post GMAT Tip of the Week: Making Your GMAT Score SupeRIOr to Ryan Lochte’s appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: The Power of Deduction on GMAT Data Suffi [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2016, 11:01
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: The Power of Deduction on GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions
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In a previous post, we have discussed how to find the total number of factors of a number. What does the total number of factors a number has tell us about that number? One might guess, “Not a lot,” but it actually does tell us quite a bit! If the total number of factors is odd, you know the number must be a perfect square. If the total number of factors is even, you know the number is not a perfect square.

We know that the total number of factors of a number A (prime factorised as X^p * Y^q *…) is given by (p+1)*(q+1)… etc.

So, if we know that a number has, say, 6 total factors, what can we say about the number?

6 = (p+1)*(q+1) = 2*3, so p = 1 and q = 2 or vice versa.

A = X^1 * Y^2 where X and Y are distinct prime numbers.

Today, we will look at a data sufficiency question in which we can use factors to deduce much more information than what we might first guess:

When the digits of a two-digit, positive integer M are reversed, the result is the two-digit, positive integer N. If M > N, what is the value of M?

Statement 1: The integer (M – N) has 12 unique factors.

Statement 2: The integer (M – N) is a multiple of 9.

With this question, we are told that M is a two-digit integer and N is obtained by reversing it. So if M = 21, then N = 12; if M = 83, then N = 38 (keeping in mind that M must be greater than N). In the generic form:

M = 10a + b and N =10b + a (where a and b are single-digit numbers from 1 to 9. Neither can be 0 or greater than 9 since both M and N are two-digit numbers.)

We also know that no matter what M and N are, M > N. Therefore:

10a + b > 10b + a

9a > 9b

a > b

Let’s examine both of our given statements:

Statement 1: The integer (M – N) has 12 unique factors.

First, let’s figure out what M – N is:

M – N = (10a + b) – (10b + a) = 9a – 9b

Say M – N = A. This would mean A = 9(a-b) = 3^2 * (a-b)

The total number of factors of A where A = X^p * Y^q *… can be calculated using the formula (p+1)*(q+1)* …

We know that A has 3^2 as a factor, so X = 3 and p = 2. Therefore, the total number of factors would be (2+1)*(q+1)*… = 3*(q+1)*… = 12, so (q+1)*… must be 4.

Case 1:

This means q may be 3 so that (q+1) is 4. Since a-b must be less than or equal to 9 and must also be the cube of a number, (a-b) must be 8. (Note that a-b cannot be 1 because then the total number of factors of A would only be 3.)

So, a must be 9 and b must be 1 in this case (since a > b). The integers will be 91 and 19, and since M > N, M = 91.

Case 2:

Another possibility is that (a-b) is a product of two prime factors (other than 3), both with the power of 1. In that case, the total number of factors = (2+1)*(1+1)*(1+1) = 12

Note, however, that the two prime factors (other than 3) with the smallest product is 2*5 = 10, but the difference of two single-digit positive integers cannot be 10. This means that only Case 1 can be true, therefore, Statement 1 alone is sufficient. This is certainly not what we expected to find from just the total number of factors!

Statement 2: The integer (M – N) is a multiple of 9.

M – N = (10a + b) – (10b + a) = 9a – 9b, so M – N = 9 (a-b) . This is already a multiple of 9.

We get no new information with this statement; (a-b) can be any integer, such as 2 (a = 5, b = 3 or a = 7, b = 5), etc. This statement alone is insufficient, therefore our answer is A.

Don’t take the given data of a GMAT question at face value, especially if you are expecting questions from the 700+ range. Ensure that you have deduced everything that you can from it before coming to a conclusion.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: The Power of Deduction on GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Tips to Improve Your Class Ranking [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2016, 12:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Tips to Improve Your Class Ranking
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Most high-schoolers understand that a student’s GPA and class rank go hand in hand. A student’s class rank reveals how they are performing compared to other classmates. In addition, a high school student’s class ranking is one of the elements taken into account by preferred colleges. Take a look at a few tips that can help high school students who’d like to achieve a higher class rank:

Evaluate Study Habits

One thing students can do to raise their GPA is to evaluate their study habits. Some students create a study routine in middle school and practice that same routine throughout their high school years. Unfortunately, this can prevent a student from focusing more attention on subjects that need improvement.

A student should start by looking at the grades they are getting on assignments in each subject. For example, if a student is faring well in English but earned B’s on their last two algebra quizzes, then they should devote more study time to algebra. The most effective study sessions are the ones that are tailored to address a student’s current academic needs.

Take Summer Courses

Most high school students take both required and elective courses. Physical education and health are examples of required courses in many high schools. Students who want to improve their GPA may explore the possibility of taking these required courses during the summer. One of the benefits of this is it allows students the opportunity to take more challenging courses during the school year. Secondly, summer classes are usually abbreviated, which means a student could finish a required class in a few weeks as opposed to dedicating an entire semester to it. Getting a quick A in physical education or health over the summer would be a positive way for a student to begin the next school year.

Get the Assistance of a Tutor

Some students can boost their class ranking by getting just a little bit of help from a tutor. For instance, a student who is having trouble in Geometry might find that they understand various theorems better when they are explained by a tutor. Another student might be able to write more convincing compositions for English class after a tutor shows them a few simple ways to organize their ideas. Sometimes a tutor can provide students with different ways of looking at various concepts and topics. A fresh perspective can be the key to a student’s success in a particular subject.

Take Advantage of Opportunities for Extra Credit

For students in high school, class rank can be affected by their performance in just one difficult course. For example, a student taking a challenging science class may earn a C on an important exam. In an effort to raise that grade, the student can ask the instructor if they can complete an extra credit assignment to make up for the loss of points.

It’s a good idea for a student to have some suggestions for extra credit, such as reading a biography of a famous scientist and writing a paper about the individual. Chances are that the instructor will admire the student’s initiative and provide an extra credit assignment. In short, students have some options when they want to raise a grade in order to improve their high school class rank.

A Note About High School Class Rankings

Though GPA is always a factor in determining class rank, high school students must find out whether their ranking is weighted or unweighted. A weighted class rank means that the difficulty of a course factors into a student’s GPA. Alternatively, an unweighted class rank doesn’t factor in the difficulty of a student’s courses. Students can ask a guidance counselor for clarification on how class rank is determined at their school.

Some high school students who take AP courses might have a harder time keeping a high class rank due to the more challenging material they’re studying, but they have the benefit of being able to go on to take AP subject tests in preparation for college. At Veritas Prep, we provide AP test tutoring services. Our students learn from professional instructors who are experts in the subjects they teach. We offer students solid instruction along with the encouragement they need to master the test.

Our staff at Veritas Prep assists students with studying for both the SAT and ACT, building impressive college applications, crafting standout admissions essays, and more! Contact our offices today and let us know how we can help.

Are you preparing to apply to college? We can help! Visit our College Admissions website and fill out our FREE Profile Evaluation for personalized feedback on your unique background! And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+, and Twitter!

The post Tips to Improve Your Class Ranking appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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How to Break Into Consulting from a Non-Feeder MBA Program [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2016, 18:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: How to Break Into Consulting from a Non-Feeder MBA Program
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Is your post-MBA goal to enter the competitive field of consulting? If your future business school isn’t a consulting feeder school, don’t despair! Just because your MBA program is not a major feeder into the consulting company of your dreams does not mean that all hope is lost – this just means that you will have to be a bit more strategic and make the most of the more limited opportunities you have to network and interview.

Before we dive into our tips on how to break into consulting from non-feeder MBA programs, it is important to understand what constitutes a non-feeder program. The quick answer: a non-feeder program is a business school at which a specific consulting firm or many consulting firms do not utilize heavy recruiting resources to secure new talent. This can be by not participating in on-campus recruiting, not hiring in major numbers, only hiring locally, or not hiring at all. The employment report of your school should help you deduce the majority of this information.

Now, if you are in this situation, there are still a few ways you can approach the consulting recruiting process to maximize your chances at success:

Create a Plan

Being strategic is one of the most important factors that will help you be successfully hired by a consulting firm, especially if you’re coming from a non-feeder school. Your school’s employment report is your best friend here. Look first at the firms that are “low hanging fruit” – as in ones that already have somewhat of a presence at your school or in the nearby community – then research the other companies that will require much more leg work, and move accordingly.

Start Early

Given that your school is not a key source of talent for some of your target firms, you will need to work a little harder to get on their radar. Whether it is connecting with alumni or utilizing networks, such as a diversity network or your undergraduate network, start this process early because proper networking takes time. At feeder programs, these relationships often occur organically; at non-feeder programs, you will need to leverage your personal network and school resources to tap into these potential decision-makers.

Make the Most of Your Chances

You most likely will not have as many chances as a student from a feeder school to impress upon the firm-specific recruiting team of your qualifications, so it is critical you make the most of your opportunities to snag an offer. If you are fortunate enough to get an interview, it is up to you to perform well in the interview process (if you are unable to secure an offer at that point, then it does not matter as much what program you come from). The case interview in consulting tends to be the great equalizer among applicants, so make the most of your chance, here.

Be Realistic

Finally, it is important to be realistic. Some firms simply will not recruit from a specific program for reasons out of your control, no matter how qualified you feel you are or how well you network. Part of going through the business school selection process is identifying (and hopefully gaining admission) to the schools that will allow you to reach your specific post-MBA career goals, especially if you have certain consulting firms in mind.

Consulting remains one of the most competitive industries to break into, regardless of which MBA program you attend. Utilize the tips above to maximize your chances of securing an offer from the consulting firm of your dreams.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can read more articles by him here.

The post How to Break Into Consulting from a Non-Feeder MBA Program appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Scheduling Your GMAT Test: Dates, Where & When to Take the GMAT Exam [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2016, 11:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Scheduling Your GMAT Test: Dates, Where & When to Take the GMAT Exam
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Most business professionals and others who want to earn their MBA know that taking the GMAT is one step along the path to business school. In addition, you probably know that the GMAT gauges your skills in several different subject areas, from Reading Comprehension to Geometry to essay-writing. But while you might have a plan of study ready to go, you may still have some practical questions about registering for the test.

Get the lowdown on the GMAT, test dates and locations, as well as how long a person should take to prep for this difficult exam before signing up:

When Can I Take the GMAT?

If you are planning to take the GMAT, you’ll be glad to know that it is given many times throughout the year. The process begins by visiting the official website for the GMAT. Fortunately, it is fairly easy to sign up to take the GMAT. Exam dates are shown for testing centers that are convenient to you – once you choose the most convenient place to take the GMAT, testing dates and times are made available for your consideration. Keep in mind that there is a fee of $250 to take the test.

Where Do I Take the Test?

To find a testing location, type your complete address into the search engine on the GMAT website. You may also enter in your city and state or simply your ZIP code to get results. This data brings up options for testing locations in your area. You can choose up to three options to compare times for the GMAT, exam dates, and convenient locations. This search allows you to settle on a testing situation that suits your schedule. GMAT exam-takers should then sign up for the dates and times they like best.

How Do I Sign Up for the GMAT?

After looking at GMAT test dates and locations, you can create an account on the testing website. This allows you to register for the exam and gives you access to other important test information. Not only can someone taking the GMAT schedule test appointments with this account, but you can also reschedule a test or cancel your testing appointment if necessary.

How Long Do I Need to Prepare for the GMAT?

It’s a good idea to study for the GMAT in a gradual way. Trying to cram for this challenging test can be stressful and result in a waste of your time and money. Three months is a reasonable amount of time to spend preparing for this exam.

The GMAT has four sections: Analytical Writing, Integrated Reasoning, Quantitative, and Verbal. Taking a practice test should be your first order of business when preparing for the exam. The results can help you determine where to begin your studies. In order to achieve a high score on the GMAT, you must learn how to approach the questions on the test as opposed to memorizing facts. Our thorough GMAT curriculum at Veritas Prep teaches you how to evaluate and interpret the questions on this exam to filter out unessential information. We teach you how to think like a professional in the business world so you can showcase your higher-level thinking skills on test day.

Helpful Tips for Test Day

It’s normal to be at least a little bit nervous on test day, but you can reduce that anxiety by making sure that you take everything you need to the testing location. For example, you need to have government-issued identification that includes your name, date of birth, photo, and signature in order to take the test. Keep in mind that the name on your ID must be the same as the one on your registration form.

Prepare to spend about four hours at the testing location. Testers may take advantage of the optional two breaks to refresh themselves. Remember that phones, tablets, and other technological devices are not allowed in the testing room.

At Veritas Prep, our professional instructors have the experience and the knowledge to prepare you for the GMAT. Our students learn strategies that give them an advantage over their fellow test-takers. We offer a variety of study options that help you to garner the skills and knowledge you need to walk into the testing center with confidence. Call or email our offices today to get started on the path toward admission into a preferred business school.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And as always, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter!

The post Scheduling Your GMAT Test: Dates, Where & When to Take the GMAT Exam appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Tips for Applying to Business School as a Couple [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2016, 19:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Tips for Applying to Business School as a Couple
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If you think applying to business school is a stressful ordeal, then magnify that two-fold and you have the situation that is faced each year by many couples who choose to apply to business school together. Now, this experience represents just a small percentage of total applications, but for those in the midst of applying as a couple, the impact can be life changing.  Let’s explore some tips for applying to business school as a couple:

Understand the Process:

The application process for couples can vary from school to school. At some programs you can identify yourself as a couple in your application, but at others your status will be a bit fuzzier, so make sure you are clear on your target school’s unique process to best position your joint applications for success.

Communicate Your Situation:

It is difficult for the Admissions Committee to take your situation into consideration if they are unaware a situation even exists. As such, make sure you and your significant other communicate your joint status early and often. As a couple, it is even more important to attend admissions road shows, information sessions, and of course, campus visits. These present great opportunities to connect with admissions and show them directly why you and your partner would be a great fit for the school.

Be prepared to state your value overtly, as this could aid your candidacy come decision day. Don’t forget the Admissions Committees at each school are just human beings, so they will employ compassion in their consideration and not aim not to break up families/married couples if both applicants represent a fit with the program.

Select Schools Strategically:

One of the hardest parts of applying jointly to business school is identifying programs that make sense for BOTH applicants. Outside of applying to the same schools, there are a few ways to expand your options as a couple.

Thinking about potential schools in terms of cities can be helpful – Chicago (Kellogg/Booth), Boston (Harvard/MIT), New York (Columbia/Stern/Wharton), the Bay Area (Stanford/Berkeley), etc. – so figure out what makes the most sense for both you and your significant other and consider an application strategy the provides maximum flexibility. Thinking in terms of cities will help you develop the backup plan of applying in Round 2 to a school that will at least allow you to still be in the same city as your partner if only one of you is accepted to a certain program.

Be Realistic:

Applying as an individual takes a lot of self-awareness, but when applying as a couple, this needs to be even more heightened. Few couples are complete equals when it comes to the admissions process, which can bring about some uncomfortable conversations and difficult decisions. So, think long and hard about the permutations and combinations of your applicant strategy if one or both of you gets accepted to each school you are applying to. Remember, admissions decisions are individual – you will each stand on your own merits, so the strength of one candidate will not override an unqualified partner.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can read more articles by him here.

The post Tips for Applying to Business School as a Couple appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Why Go to Business School: The Benefits of an MBA [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2016, 15:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Why Go to Business School: The Benefits of an MBA
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Why business school? This is a question encountered by many ambitious people who decide to pursue a master’s degree. Individuals in an MBA program take courses that deepen their knowledge of accounting, marketing, management, and finance. They also take classes that improve their leadership, communication, and problem-solving skills.

Acquiring this advanced level of knowledge and earning an MBA benefits a professional in the business world in a variety of ways. Check out some of the specific benefits of an MBA degree:

Gain More In-Depth Knowledge of Business

Why go to business school? In addition to expanding their knowledge of accounting, management, and other basic business practices, students who earn an MBA can specialize their degree. For instance, a professional who wants to achieve greater success in a public relations career can earn an MBA with a focus on that particular discipline. Other examples of MBA specialties include Internet marketing, hospitality management, and sports management. A student who earns an MBA walks away with a deeper understanding of their particular field of work.

Earn a Higher Salary

One of the most appealing benefits of an MBA is that it can lead to a higher salary. Someone with this advanced degree has a greater understanding of business practices than someone who possesses only an undergraduate degree. A person with an MBA has specialized skills and knowledge that can benefit a company’s bottom line.

Business schools have a number of requirements that applicants must fulfill. For one, they need to see a student’s scores on the GRE, the GMAT, or both. At Veritas Prep, we provide in-person and online instruction to prepare students for the GRE. We also help students study for the GMAT. Students learn tips and strategies from experienced instructors who have taken these tests with great success! Our tutors use excellent study resources and materials to provide students with first-rate instruction.

Establish Relationships and Garner Contacts

One of the most notable benefits of business school is the opportunity to establish relationships with other business professionals. While earning this advanced degree, students work with individuals like themselves who are likely to achieve tremendous success in their field. These relationships can continue to grow after graduation, proving helpful to an individual as they pursue success in business. Plus, students learn from professors who have relationships with executives in the business world. After graduation, a student may be able to get a recommendation from a professor or get a valuable lead on an open position with a growing company.

Often, well-known executives speak to classes of MBA students. They share their experiences and advice on how to accomplish career goals. Talking with a visiting executive gives a student another opportunity to establish a connection with a business professional that could prove useful later on.

Rise Higher in a Particular Field

Why go to business school? This is a question heard by many business professionals who decide to go back to school after working in their field for several years. One of the benefits of business school is that it gives graduates the knowledge and training they need to rise higher in their profession. They may feel that they have gone as far as they can with just an undergraduate degree in business and they need more skills to make further progress toward their career goals. For instance, a professional who has worked in the marketing department of a company for ten years might decide to earn an MBA with a specialty in Internet marketing. This could prepare them for a promotion to a higher position within the department.

Start a Business

Why business school for an entrepreneur? An entrepreneur who earns an MBA is more prepared for the challenges of starting a business. In fact, a student going through an MBA program can specialize the degree to focus on entrepreneurship. An MBA student specializing in entrepreneurship studies topics such as entrepreneurial finance, technology, and recognizing opportunities that will help a new business to grow. An entrepreneur armed with this knowledge is increasing their chances of success as a business owner.

At Veritas Prep, we assist individuals as they progress on the path toward gaining admission into a preferred business school. Contact our offices today to learn more about our test prep options.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter.

The post Why Go to Business School: The Benefits of an MBA appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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The Best Undergraduate Business Schools [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2016, 18:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: The Best Undergraduate Business Schools
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Naturally, ambitious high school students who plan to pursue a career in business want to take a close look at the undergraduate business school rankings published every year. They understand that graduating from one of the top undergraduate business schools can increase their chances of landing a job at a growing company. But what qualities differentiate these undergraduate business schools from all of the others?

Discover some of the most desirable features that the best undergrad business schools have to offer their students:

Qualified Faculty Members

Highly ranked undergraduate business schools have a faculty made up of knowledgeable professors. Often, these schools hire professors who have several years of experience working for a company or corporation. Consequently, students are learning from individuals who have practical knowledge of the business world. Plus, many of the best business schools limit the number of students in each class. As a result, each student is able to receive individual attention from their professor. This allows students to get the most value out of each of their courses.

Students who are curious about their chances of getting into a particular undergraduate school can use Veritas Prep’s free admissions calculator. Our calculator compares a person’s GPA, test scores, and other information with the data of students admitted into a particular college. Students can use the results provided by our admissions calculator to help them decide which undergraduate business schools to apply to.

A Thorough Program of Study

The top business schools provide undergraduate students with a thorough program of study. This type of program includes courses in Economics, Management, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Accountancy, Marketing, Analytics, and Data Science. When a student graduates from a high-ranking school, they will have knowledge of many different areas of business.

Internship Opportunities

Many of the top undergrad business schools have solid relationships with well-known companies and corporations. This opens the door to a variety of internship opportunities for students at the school. Getting an internship at a profitable company can help a student to gain the experience they need to get a great job after graduation. Furthermore, a student who works as an intern can establish contacts with professionals who work at the company. These contacts can be helpful resources as an individual begins to search for a job after graduation.

Executive Speakers

Many of the top undergraduate business schools invite executives to speak to classes of students. These executives share insights and experiences that give students a clear picture of what it’s like to work in the business world. One student may decide to pursue work in a particular area of business after listening to an executive speaker. Another student may plan to apply for work at a specific company after hearing about the company’s goals from a visiting professional. The best undergraduate business schools recognize the value that guest speakers bring to the student body.

A Variety of Financial Aid Options

Undergraduate business schools that are highly ranked provide students with a selection of financial aid options. These schools are looking for well-qualified, determined students who are dedicated to getting the most out of their education. They offer several financial aid options so students from all backgrounds have the opportunity to earn a business degree, as most schools want a campus full of students with different beliefs and interests.

Recruitment Opportunities

The top business schools for undergraduate students attract recruiters from profitable companies and corporations. Seniors have the opportunity to talk with many representatives of these companies to find out about employment opportunities after they graduate. Many of the best business schools can claim that a large percentage of their graduates are hired by these companies every year. The opportunity to work for a well-known company is an enticing factor for many high school students in search of an undergraduate business school.

Our team at Veritas Prep helps high school students prepare for the SAT and ACT by giving them the strategies they need to master each part of these exams. Our prep courses are available both online and in-person. We also have a staff of experienced admissions consultants who can help students with their college applications. We understand the importance of submitting an impressive application to the best undergraduate business schools throughout the country – contact Veritas Prep today and let us assist you on the path toward business school!

Do you still need to help with your college applications? We can help! Visit our College Admissions website and fill out our FREE Profile Evaluation for personalized feedback on your unique background! And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+, and Twitter!

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What You Can Learn from Zootopia About Setting Realistic MBA Goals [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2016, 14:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: What You Can Learn from Zootopia About Setting Realistic MBA Goals
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Zootopia, one of 2016’s top box office hits (grossing over $1 billion dollars), is an animated Disney movie showcasing impressive visuals, funny moments and a powerful theme of acceptance and inclusion. Seemingly a children’s movie, nods to iconic films and television shows such as The Godfather, Breaking Bad, and older Disney works prove to entertain the whole family.

In this entry, we will use this popular movie to illustrate how to strengthen one of the most important aspects of your MBA application: identifying your ambitious, but achievable, post-MBA goals.

Showcasing Your Achievements

Like many MBA applicants, Zootopia‘s main character, Judy Hopps, has excellent academic credentials (valedictorian of her class) and big goals. Judy also has an idealistic view of Zootopia (the city in which she lives), believing that anybody can be anything. Although she has initial success in becoming the first rabbit cop amongst heavyweight mammals (such as buffalo, rhinos, and elephants), she still faces many struggles in her career.

Lessons Learned:

As you write your MBA application essays, highlighting your various distinctions and achievements – including any barriers you have broken or obstacles you have encountered and surpassed (or hopped over) – will help showcase that you possess the ability, drive and perseverance necessary to achieve your future goals.

Ability to Overcome Challenges

The movie also deftly shows how Judy had to grow through prejudices and biases, both of others and of herself, while still keeping her idealism and her belief that she can make an impact on her anthropomorphic world. Seeing Judy win over the trust of her boss, who doubted her abilities to get the job done, makes us believe even more that she can achieve great things in the future.

Lessons Learned:

Sharing personal, vivid anecdotes of the struggles you have faced and how these challenges have helped you evolve and mature will make your business school application more compelling. Sharing your failures, weaknesses, and realizations will allow the Admissions Committee to understand and relate to you better. Remember, you don’t have to be perfect – nobody is!

Using your essays to showcase your self-awareness, how you have handled adversity, and how you have grown will make it more convincing that your post-MBA goals are not driven by blind idealism, but are grounded in reality and are actually achievable. For example, if your future goal requires working with regulators and big businesses across various industries to create social impact, it would be a good idea to share experiences of the similar challenges you have faced in the past, and how you have effectively collaborated with counterparts representing different agendas.

As you identify your bold post-MBA goals, show that you have the experiences, skills and expertise that are necessary to accomplish these goals.  Be sure to refer to specific episodes in your past that display your awareness of what happens on the ground, and that your path to your goal is based on a well-thought-out plan, with the next step being an MBA at your target program. You could also identify the unique benefits you would gain from an MBA at this particular program, enumerating the necessary steps to achieving your objectives.

Outlining these various details will help convince the Admissions Committee that you know what you are getting into, why you need an MBA, and how you will succeed after graduation.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! And as always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Written by Edison Cu, a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for INSEAD.

The post What You Can Learn from Zootopia About Setting Realistic MBA Goals appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Marisa

Veritas Prep | Veritas Prep Representative

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Kudos [?]: 156 [0], given: 2

What You Can Learn from Zootopia About Setting Realistic MBA Goals   [#permalink] 26 Aug 2016, 14:00

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