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Violin strings often go “dead”—become less responsive and dull in tone

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Violin strings often go “dead”—become less responsive and dull in tone  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jan 2019, 21:44
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

72% (01:32) correct 28% (01:53) wrong based on 103 sessions

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Violin strings often go “dead”—become less responsive and dull in tone—after a few weeks of intense use. A professor whose niece is a classical violinist hypothesized that dirt and oil, rather than changes in the material properties of the string, were responsible.

Which of the following investigations is most likely to yield significant information that would help to evaluate the professor’s hypothesis?


A. Determining if a metal alloy is used to make the strings used by classical violinists

B. Determining whether classical violinists make their strings go dead faster than do folk violinists

C. Determining whether identical lengths of string, of the same gauge, go dead at different rates when strung on various brands of violins.

D. Determining whether a dead string and a new string produce different qualities of sound

E. Determining whether smearing various substances on new violin strings causes them to go dead

[b]KUDOS FOR EVERY EXPLANATION[\b]
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Re: Violin strings often go “dead”—become less responsive and dull in tone  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2019, 07:38
1
I think is D because , smearing substances on new strings would help explain its performance as compare to new strings w/o substances.
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Re: Violin strings often go “dead”—become less responsive and dull in tone  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2019, 09:33
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karthikkaushik91 wrote:
I guess E. wts the OA?


Sent from my iPhone using GMAT Club Forum mobile app



OA is E but i dont have explanation
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Re: Violin strings often go “dead”—become less responsive and dull in tone  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2019, 09:44
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mangamma wrote:
Violin strings often go “dead”—become less responsive and dull in tone—after a few weeks of intense use. A professor whose niece is a classical violinist hypothesized that dirt and oil, rather than changes in the material properties of the string, were responsible.

Which of the following investigations is most likely to yield significant information that would help to evaluate the professor’s hypothesis?


A. Determining if a metal alloy is used to make the strings used by classical violinists

B. Determining whether classical violinists make their strings go dead faster than do folk violinists

C. Determining whether identical lengths of string, of the same gauge, go dead at different rates when strung on various brands of violins.

D. Determining whether a dead string and a new string produce different qualities of sound

E. Determining whether smearing various substances on new violin strings causes them to go dead

KUDOS FOR EVERY EXPLANATION[\b]


Hi [b]karthikkaushik91 , mangamma

Its been a long time since this question was posted.

Actually this is an OG CR question, just the words(violinists have been replaced with Guitarists) have been changed, You can find it here.

https://gmatclub.com/forum/guitar-strin ... 24175.html

Let me know if further any clarification is required.
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Re: Violin strings often go “dead”—become less responsive and dull in tone   [#permalink] 02 Feb 2019, 09:44
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